Category: Hopewell

TWW Launches Two-Year Project to Paint Fire Hydrants, Color Coding Them to Indicate Flow Rate for Fire Suppression

September 22, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Water Works will be painting 3,501 fire hydrants in its five-municipality service area over the next 24 months, weather permitting.

“We are improving the quality of TWW’s fire hydrants for effective fire suppression,” said Michael Walker, Chief of Communications and Community Relations. “We’ve been inspecting fire hydrants for operability and flow rate over the last few months, and we now plan to vary their color to indicate how quickly water flows from them to fire personnel and emergency responders.”

TWW personnel will strip hydrants of old layers of paint, and then apply primer and two fresh coats. Color codes to indicate flow volume in gallons per minute are as follows: Light Blue: 1,500 gallons per minute; Green: 1,000-1,499 gallons per minute; Orange: 500-999 gallons per minute; Red: less than 500 gallons per minute. 

TWW personnel must have direct access to the hydrants. We are therefore asking residents to please remove any plantings or decorations that might be obscuring local hydrants. Hydrants should never be blocked, hidden, or decorated, as this interferes with emergency access.

“We ask that residents not paint or decorate fire hydrants, which prevents fire personnel from knowing a hydrant’s flow rate during an emergency,” added Walker.

If you have questions about TWW’s hydrant paint project, including reporting hydrants that have been knocked over or are not functioning properly, please call TWW’s Construction and Maintenance at (609) 989-3222.

Hopewell Valley Central High School Switches To Remote Learning Due to COVID-19

September 16, 2020

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Hopewell Valley Regional School District switches Central High School to remote learning for Thursday and Friday due to COVID-19 protocols. See official notice below:

HVRSD COVID NOTIFICATION 9/16/ 2020
HVRSD WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2020

Earlier today we notified Central High School families and staff of a confirmed COVID case.  Based on our initial discussions with the Department of Health, we believe this case is limited to Central High School. Following our District protocols, Central High School will transition to Full Remote Learning for all students on Thursday and Friday, September 17 and 18.  All after-school activities are cancelled during this time. No students or staff will be allowed in the building until Monday morning, September 21, 2020.  This will provide ample time for our staff to deep clean the building and the Department of Health to conduct contact tracing. ALL OTHER HVRSD SCHOOLS WILL REMAIN OPEN.

We need your assistance during this public health emergency to keep us all safe. Please adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Parents of all in-person students MUST complete the daily symptom form in OnCourse or on the HVRSD app.  We will continue to temperature screen students each morning. 
    • Failure to complete the daily screening will result in exclusion from school.
    • If your child has any COVID symptoms, do not send him/her to school.
    • If your child exhibits COVID symptoms while at school, he/she will be excluded for 10 days, unless cleared by a physician.
    • If your child has COVID symptoms, please contact your doctor and school nurse*.
    • If your family is quarantining due to possible exposure, please inform your school nurse*. *All information is confidential.

HVRSD Notification Protocols

Notification of a confirmed or suspected case in your child’s school:

  1. Email sent immediately from the building principal to all families in that school notifying them of a confirmed or suspected case. Personal information of the suspected or confirmed case is private and will not be shared.
  2. Email sent from the District with school closure information based on the Department of Health’s initial investigation.

Possible exposure notification:

  1. If your child has been identified as having been in contact with a confirmed or suspected case, you will be contacted by the Department of Health. Contact is defined as: within 6 feet for more than 10 minutes.
  2. If you are identified as a contact through the Department of Health tracing process, you will be contacted directly by the Department of Health with further details. 

We appreciate your assistance to keep our schools safe. 

NJ Task Force 1 Returns Home From Hurricane Laura

See Previous MidJersey.News story here: New Jersey Task Force 1 Deploys to Louisiana in Response to Hurricane Laura

August 29, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–Just after 3 pm NJ Office Of Emergency Management, Urban Search and Rescue, New Jersey Task Force 1 returned to the area as the passed through the NJ Turnpike toll booths on their way back to their headquarters.

The team was activated for response to Hurricane Laura in the early morning hours of August 27, 2020. The team traveled south to stage near Atlanta, Georgia until needed. Early this morning the Federal Emergency Management Agency – FEMA adjusted the Federal response to local needs and NJ-TF1 received demobilization orders and begun the process of heading home.

NJ-TF1 deployed as a Type 1 Team consisting of 80 team members, three tractor-trailers, two box trucks, five F-450 utility vehicles, two crew carriers, an F-250 towing vehicle, two passenger vans, two utility terrain vehicles, and a fleet service truck. A water rescue component of six boats with trailers and a water support trailer were also deployed.

Local members known to MidJersey.News are:

Hamilton Township Fire Department:

Jarred Pierson, Jason Ryan, Kinte Holt, Brad Ladislaw, Jeff Barlow and Joe Flynn.

West Windsor Emergency Service, and West Windsor Police Department:

Joe Gribbins, Scott Cook, Michael McMahon

Ewing Township Fire Department:

Eric Rowlands

Bristol Myers Squibb:

John Welling

Civilian: (K-9, NJ Rescue & Recovery K-9)

Jennifer Michelson

58 Arrested and Charged in Mercer County in Multi-Jurisdictional ATM Theft Scam


During the investigation, bank cards, debit cards, credit cards, cash, marijuana, and a handgun were recovered.  Additionally, more than a dozen vehicles were seized throughout the county.  Robbinsville K-9 Quori sniffed out cocaine totaling 150 grams in the trunk of one of the suspect vehicles in Robbinsville.


See previous MidJersey.News stories here:

UPDATE: 20 Arrested And Charged In Hamilton In Multi-Jurisdiction ATM Scam

UPDATE: Additional Santander Bank ATMs Hit In Mercer County

BREAKING: Police and FBI Investigating Multi-State ATM Robberies, Many Subjects Are In Custody More Actively Being Arrested


August 19, 2020

MERCER COUNTY, NJ—Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo J. Onofri announced today that 58 individuals were arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit theft by deception in an organized scheme that used prepaid debit cards to steal from ATMs across the county.

On August 18, 2020, at approximately 8 a.m., Robbinsville Township police officers responded to the Santander Bank on Route 33 after receiving information that multiple individuals were gathering around the ATM using stacks of cards to withdraw money and attempting to avoid the camera on the ATM.   As officers approached, the group took notice and began to hurriedly move away from the ATM.  Ultimately, 20 individuals were taken into custody by police, each with multiple debit/credit cards and money in their possession.

Robbinsville police reached out to the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office for assistance and investigators from both agencies quickly began collaborating with authorities in nearby towns like Hamilton, Hopewell, Lawrence, Princeton and West Windsor, as well as Santander Bank.

During the course of the investigation, officers learned that Camden County Prosecutor’s Office reported that multiple thefts occurred at Santander ATMs in its jurisdiction by individuals to fraudulently obtained money.  Camden County Prosecutor’s Office advised that the suspects in those thefts came from New York to commit the fraud in New Jersey.  Officers also received information from multiple law enforcement sources that instructions were being shared on social media on how to defraud Santander ATM machines.

Prosecutor Onofri praised the teamwork of local law enforcement and said the open lines of communication and sharing of resources allowed law enforcement to get ahead of these scammers in some instances. 

At about 9:40 a.m., West Windsor dispatch relayed the information that Robbinsville had a number of individuals in custody.  Dispatch also advised that Princeton reported a large sum of money fraudulently obtained from a Santander ATM in its jurisdiction.  Information also came in relating that the FBI and the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office were actively investigating these cases.

“As a result, heightened awareness was given to the activity at Santander locations in West Windsor,” Prosecutor Onofri said.  “West Windsor officers and detectives from my office were able to detain and investigate five separate crews of suspects at different times throughout the day at the Santander Bank on Princeton-Hightstown Road, resulting in many arrests.”

In Lawrence Township, police were also alerted to the ATM scam perpetrated against the Princeton Santander, and a description was provided of the suspects and the vehicles used in commission of that crime.  Lawrence was further made aware of the countywide scam that was occurring and heightened attention was given to the Santander banks in their town.  Shortly thereafter, at about 9:45 a.m., a vehicle matching the description of the vehicle used in the Princeton scam was spotted in the area of the Santander bank at on Franklin Corner Road.  The occupants from the suspect vehicle were stopped and investigated, and ultimately charged with the conspiracy.  The bank reported abnormally high ATM usage and a shortage of approximately $40,000.

In Hamilton Township, at approximately 10 a.m., Hamilton police were detailed to the Santander Bank located on South Broad Street on the report of two suspicious vehicles in the parking lot of the bank.  It was reported that other Santander Banks in neighboring jurisdictions were reporting suspicious activities at the ATMs so units were detailed to Santander Bank ATM locations throughout Hamilton.  Additional vehicles and suspects were located throughout the day at the ATMs found at 1700 Nottingham Way, 1700 Kuser Road and 2730 Nottingham Way.  During the investigations bank cards, cash, marijuana, and a handgun were recovered.

Hopewell Township had three separate incidents involving separate crews that started around 11:30 a.m. at the Santander Bank on Pennington Road.  Several foot chases ensued and all subjects were apprehended.  In addition to the conspiracy charge, Sekou Touray, of East Orange, NJ, was charged with resisting arrest and aggravated assault of a prosecutor’s detective.

Similar incidents were reported in multiple other jurisdictions throughout the state.  The investigation is ongoing and additional charges may be pending.  Authorities are still executing search warrants and working with Santander Bank to determine exactly how much money was stolen.  At this time, the total across municipalities in Mercer County is more than $250,000.

During the investigation, bank cards, debit cards, credit cards, cash, marijuana, and a handgun were recovered.  Additionally, more than a dozen vehicles were seized throughout the county.  Robbinsville K-9 Quori sniffed out cocaine totaling 150 grams in the trunk of one of the suspect vehicles in Robbinsville.

The following individuals were arrested and charged in Mercer County on Tuesday, August 18, 2020:

Hamilton Township

  1. Tyler Holness, 21, of Yonkers, NY
  2. Rasheem Lee Jr., 18, of Bronx, NY
  3. Kymani Hinds, 18, of Bronx, NY
  4. Michael Santiago, 26, of Bronx, NY
  5. Saquan Vaines, 21, of Arverne, NY
  6. Kareema Hall, 20, of Bronx, NY
  7. Justin Brown, 22, of Arverne, NY
  8. Michael Manroop, 24, of Cambridge Heights, NY
  9. Nayvon Patten, 18, of Linderhurst, NY
  10. Jerry Trujillo, 24, of Maplewood, NJ
  11. Zaire Lewis, 18, of Maplewood, NJ
  12. Frankie Jerome, 21, of Maplewood, NJ
  13. Ahmad Muhammad, 18, of Maplewood, NJ
  14. Jordan Saquan, 24, of Brooklyn, NY
  15. Arian Rasul, 22, of Brooklyn, NY
  16. Starsheen Jones, 24, of Brooklyn, NY
  17. Jordan Amador, 27, of Brooklyn, NY
  18. Steven Wilson, 23, of New York, NY
  19. Nikye Bee, 25, of New York, NY
  20. Kevin Jones, 23, of New York, NY

Hopewell Township

  1. Ebrama Touray, 23, of East Orange, NJ
  2. Mbemba Kaba, 23, of East Orange, NJ
  3. Yacouba Sanogo, 24, of Newark, NJ
  4. Sekou Touray, 22, of East Orange, NJ
  5. Kingsley Nicolas, 22, of East Orange, NJ
  6. Orlando C. Chambers Jr., 21, of Lindenhurst, NY
  7. Emmanuel Edoise Oyakhilome, 22, of Lindenhurst, NY

Lawrence Township

  1. Elijah N. Oliver, 22, of Brooklyn, NY
  2. Dandrea Taylor Dey, 22, of Brooklyn, NY
  3. Quentin A. Hosten, 22, of Brooklyn, NY
  4. Zachary B. Johnson, 21, of Brooklyn, NY

Robbinsville Township

  1. Amoire Dupree, 26, of Brooklyn, NY
  2. Brittany Gittens, 20, of Brooklyn, NY
  3. Hurshum Gittens, 26, of Brooklyn, NY
  4. Charles Gordon, 30, of Brooklyn, NY
  5. Veronica Gregory, 22, of Brooklyn, NY
  6. Oswin Philander, 21, of Brooklyn, NY
  7. Jeffrey Debrosse, 31, of Brooklyn, NY
  8. Bolade Akingboy, 29, of West Hempstead, NY
  9. Jeffrey Desir, 34, of Brooklyn, NY
  10. Julio Ramos, 33, of Jamaica, NY
  11. Kevin Philander, 26, of Newark, DE
  12. Jishawn Lee, 19, of Brooklyn, NY
  13. Marlon Owens, 28, of Bronx, NY
  14. Alex Burnett, 30, of Jersey City, NJ
  15. D.T., 16, of Brooklyn, NY
  16. J.F., 16, of Brooklyn, NY
  17. Ackeem Samuel, 25, of Brooklyn, NY
  18. Brandon Esperance, 20, of Brooklyn, NY
  19. Kevin Owusu, 19, of Brooklyn, NY
  20. Kareem Courtney, 23, of Brooklyn, NY

West Windsor

  1. Philek Barington, 25, of Queens, NY
  2. LaTonya S. Stevens, 26, of Bronx, NY
  3. Qwashan D. Mack, 19, of North Brunswick, NJ
  4. Hymeen S. Reynolds, 19, of East Orange, NJ
  5. Brajae U. Jones, 23, of Englewood, NJ
  6. Bryon K Jones Jr., 28, of Garfield, NJ
  7. Carla E. Donayre-Solano, 28, of Garfield, NJ

Despite having been charged, every defendant is presumed innocent until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.





UPDATE: Additional Santander Bank ATMs Hit In Mercer County

This investigation remains fluid, numerous local and state police, multiple prosecutor’s offices officers, FBI and others are actively working on this case. There are many subjects arrested in multiple jurisdictions, in multiple states in relation to these crimes. MidJersey.News has reached out to the FBI and other agencies for comment but public press information is not available yet. This is a major developing story.


See Updated MidJersey.News story here: 58 Arrested and Charged in Mercer County in Multi-Jurisdictional ATM Theft Scam

UPDATE: 20 Arrested And Charged In Hamilton In Multi-Jurisdiction ATM Scam

See this morning’s MidJersey.News breaking news story here: BREAKING: Police and FBI Investigating Multi-State ATM Robberies, Many Subjects Are In Custody More Actively Being Arrested


August 18, 2020

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP-ROBBINSVILLE TOWNSHIP-HAMILTON TOWNSHIP-LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–This afternoon several police vehicles descended on Independence Plaza Shopping Mall on Broad Street in the area of the Santander Bank. It is believed to be related to the ATM robberies that span from NY to PA and were on going until at least late this afternoon.

Another Hamilton Township Santander location on Nottingham Way was hit around 5 pm where police have at least five in custody. The suspects were apprehended on Nottingham Way near Clifford Avenue the vehicle was impounded.

This afternoon Robbinsville Police remained busy at the Robbinsville Santander location. Around 1:30 pm another attempt with the ATM machine at that location the suspect fled in a white vehicle.

Sources say that up to nine people were arrested at the Hopewell Township location today after at least three different attempts to gain money from the Santander on Route 31.

The Santander in Lawrence police activity at that location also.

MidJersey.News is providing these reports from on scene reporting, radio reports and other sources. No public information has been made available yet, once available the story will be updated.


BREAKING: Police and FBI Investigating Multi-State ATM Robberies, Many Subjects Are In Custody More Actively Being Arrested

August 18, 2020


See Updated MidJersey.News story here: 58 Arrested and Charged in Mercer County in Multi-Jurisdictional ATM Theft Scam

UPDATE: 20 Arrested And Charged In Hamilton In Multi-Jurisdiction ATM Scam

UPDATE: Additional Santander Bank ATMs Hit In Mercer County


BREAKING NEWS REPORT: This if from unofficial radio reports, on scene reporting, witnesses and other sourced information, once official information is released story will be updated and any corrections made.

ROBBINSVILLE-HAMILTON TOWNSHIP-PRINCETON-HOPEWELL, NJ (MERCER)–From New York though New Jersey and even into Pennsylvania numerous suspects are under arrest for robbing ATM machines.

This morning in Robbinsville several were arrested at the Santander Bank ATM and taken into custody.

In Hamilton Township this afternoon a vehicle with NY plates was stopped and several were under arrest on Yardville-Hamilton Square Road by the 195 overpass. Sources tell MidJersey.News that this is related but MidJersey.News has not been able to confirm the arrests and if it is related.

Hopewell Township on Route 31 there is police activity at a Santander Bank and a foot chase, with reported four in custody. One of the suspects has reportedly assaulted a Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office Detective.

On Princeton Pike a black sedan bearing a NY registration was being sought after.

Unofficial radio reports that so far $76,000. have been stolen from ATM machines, from Princeton, Hopewell, Hamilton and Robbinsville.

In Woodbridge Township, Middlesex County at least one Santander Bank ATM was hit in that township and one vehicle was stopped in Randolph, NJ and a firearm was recovered.

This is still a very fluid situation, the investigation is very active and arrests are continuing to be made at the time of this report. Further details to follow.

MidJersey.News has reached out to several police departments and county prosecutor’s offices and has been told to reach out to the FBI for comment. MidJersey.news has reached out to contacts at the Newark FBI office and waiting for a reply with official information. Once updated MidJersey.News will update the story.


Police activity sources say that is related to the multi-state ATM robberies, several are under arrest at Yardville-Hamilton Square Road and the I-195 overpass. Faces are blacked out since we can not confirm with any official sources that these are suspects in the ATM robberies.

Governor Phil Murphy: “The November 3rd Election will be primarily vote-by-mail”

August 14, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Governor Phil Murphy reports November 3rd election will be primarily “Vote By Mail” See statement below:


The November 3rd Election will be primarily vote-by-mail.

All active registered New Jersey voters will automatically receive a prepaid return-postage vote-by-mail ballot.

No one should have to choose between their right to vote and their health.


TRENTON – Per Gov. Phil Murphy’s announcement, the Nov. 3 General Election will be conducted primarily by mail-in ballots. This is similar to the way the July 7 Primary Election was held, and is to help reduce the spread of the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). The Mercer County Clerk’s Office is preparing to send mail-in ballots to all registered voters in the County.

Before the election, all voters, regardless of party affiliation, will receive a mail-in ballot, where they will be able to fill in their choices. Only blue or black ink will be allowed; red ink or pencil cannot be accepted. Postage on all ballots is paid. In addition to mailing in their ballots, voters will have the option of placing their ballots in one of the secure drop boxes throughout the County. There will be more drop boxes available than during the Primary Election. There will also be at least one polling place per municipality that will be open on Election Day, for voters who prefer to vote at the polls. Further details, including polling place and drop box locations, will be determined by the Mercer County Board of Elections.

Also, for those unregistered to vote, an online system will be launched on Sept. 4 to assist those people who need to be registered. More details about this system will be available as the weeks progress.

“The July 7 Election provided us a template on how to perform our Election duties in the midst of a crisis,” said Mercer County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello. “The fact is, we all must continue to do our part to reduce the risk that COVID-19 poses to the public. For those who want to vote at the polls, they can still do so by provisional ballot.”

The earliest ballots will be mailed out in late September and early October. The deadline to register to vote in time for the Primary Election remains unchanged; that date is October 13. All ballots sent in must be postmarked no later than November 3 and received by the Board of Elections no later than November 10, one week after the Election. Alternatively, voters may return their ballots personally to poll workers. These do not need to be postmarked, but received within 48 hours of polls closing.

For more information on the Nov. 3 General Election, please visit the website for the Mercer County Clerk at http://www.mercercounty.org/government/county-clerk/elections. You may also call the Elections department at 609-989-6494.

Delaware River Search After Empty Kayak Found South Of Wing Dam–Updated Person Found

August 10, 2020

August 11, 2020 update: According to the Hopewell Township Police the person from yesterday’s water search was found and is ok.


BREAKING NEWS REPORT: From on scene reports, radio reports and witnesses, if and when official information is made available story will be updated.

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP (MERCER)-LAMBERTVILLE-WEST AMWELL, NJ (HUNTERDON)–A kayak was found unoccupied in the Delaware River just south of the “wing dam” in the rapids located in West Amwell just south of Lambertville around 2:30 pm. Fire and rescue units from both New Jersey and Pennsylvania responded to the scene those included Hopewell Township, Lambertville, West Amwell, in NJ, New Hope, PA and others from the area. Rescue boats searching south of the wing dam launched at Fireman’s Eddy Boat Ramp just off of Route 29 in the D&R Canal State Park.

Units searching by boat reported over the radio finding a “debris field” of items from the kayak but after searching for hours no person was found. Areas north and south of the wing dam were searched.

No other information is available at this time about the search.


BREAKING: Massive Water Search For Reported Man Lost Tubing On Delaware River

Firefighters from two states participated in a search of at least 11 miles of the Delaware River for a missing man. After searching it was unclear the whereabouts of the lost man.

August 2, 2020 (updated 8:30 am to take Burlington off list, assignment was recalled prior to them being dispatched)

Breaking News Report: From on scene reports, witnesses and radio reports. If official information is released the story will be updated and corrected.

EWING TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Late yesterday evening (August 1, 2020) the Ewing Township Fire Department was dispatched to the Interstate 295 bridge over the Delaware River for a missing person in the river. The man was reported missing by his girlfriend around 10:15 pm. he is a white male, with red swim trunks with no shirt in a tube used to float on the water. There was also a delay of 9-1-1 calling for help so the man was lost at least a half hour before at approximately 9:45 pm.

Ewing Township Fire Department was dispatched and requested assistance from Trenton, Hamilton, Hopwell, Bucks County PA including departments from Yardley and Tullytown.

Trenton Fire Department searched in the area of the Route 1, Trenton Makes and Calhoun Street Bridges. The Hamilton Township Fire Department deployed at the Trenton Boat Ramp and searched that area to the Crosswicks Creek. A New Jersey State Police helicopter was requested for the search but was unknown if it was used.

Approximately 11 miles of river was searched from North of the 295 bridge to south of the Crosswicks Creek.

Around midnight the search was called off and all units returned to their stations. It was unclear if the man was found or there may have been further information that the man was seen walking back on one of the roadways next to the river. At the time of this report there were no official reports of the whereabouts of the missing man.

Updates On Unsolicited Seeds From China = DO NOT PLANT Contact NJ Department Of Agriculture or USDA

July 27, 2020

SEE YESTERDAY’S MIDJERSEY.NEWS STORY HERE: If You Receive Unsolicited Seeds From China DO NOT PLANT Possibly Invasive Species

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Early yesterday (Sunday) morning the Internet started to light up with mystery seeds being delivered all over the USA including New Jersey. Do not plant these seeds since they could be contaminated or be an “invasive species” that could create havoc in the ecosystem.

For New Jersey residence that have recieved the suspicious seeds contact the NJ Department of Agriculture at 609-292-3976 or contactAg@ag.nj.gov


Information on unsolicited seeds from China

https://www.nj.gov/agriculture/news/hottopics/topics200727.html

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is aware that people across the country have received unsolicited packages of seed from China in recent days. APHIS is working closely with the Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection and State departments of agriculture to prevent the unlawful entry of prohibited seeds and protect U.S. agriculture from invasive pests and noxious weeds.

Anyone in New Jersey who receives an unsolicited package of seeds from China should immediately contact the New Jersey Department of Agriculture at 609-292-3976 or contactAg@ag.nj.gov. Also, you can contact the APHIS State plant health director. Please hold onto the seeds and packaging, including the mailing label, until someone from your State department of agriculture or APHIS contacts you with further instructions. Do not plant seeds from unknown origins.


You can also report to USDA here: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/import-information/sa_sitc/ct_antismuggling

If individuals are aware of the potential smuggling of prohibited exotic fruits, vegetables, or meat products into or through the USA, they can help APHIS by contacting the confidential Antismuggling Hotline number at 800-877-3835 or by sending an Email to SITC.Mail@aphis.usda.gov. USDA will make every attempt to protect the confidentiality of any information sources during an investigation within the extent of the law.


If You Receive Unsolicited Seeds From China DO NOT PLANT Possibly Invasive Species

July 26, 2020 — Update 3:30 pm and 4:30 pm


July 27, 2020 Update 9:55 pm to include additional information for reporting to NJ Department of Agriculture:

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is aware that people across the country have received unsolicited packages of seed from China in recent days. APHIS is working closely with the Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection and State departments of agriculture to prevent the unlawful entry of prohibited seeds and protect U.S. agriculture from invasive pests and noxious weeds.

Anyone in New Jersey who receives an unsolicited package of seeds from China should immediately contact the New Jersey Department of Agriculture at 609-292-3976 or contactAg@ag.nj.gov. Also, you can contact the APHIS State plant health director. Please hold onto the seeds and packaging, including the mailing label, until someone from your State department of agriculture or APHIS contacts you with further instructions. Do not plant seeds from unknown origins.


Reports from several state’s department of agriculture reporting unsolicited seeds being mailed to random residence around the country. Moments after posting the story today, MidJersey.News received a post via Facebook of a pack of seeds sent to Hopewell Township-Washington Crossing, NJ area. Be on the lookout, Do Not Plant and report to USDA APHIS link posted below.

So far reports of seeds being sent to NJ, NY, Virginia, Utah, Louisiana, Washington State and the United Kingdom.

MidJersey.News did communicate with the NJ Department of Agriculture on Sunday about the seed issue and see links below on how to report to the USDA:

Report here: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/import-information/sa_sitc/ct_antismuggling


If individuals are aware of the potential smuggling of prohibited exotic fruits, vegetables, or meat products into or through the USA, they can help APHIS by contacting the confidential Antismuggling Hotline number at 800-877-3835 or by sending an Email to SITC.Mail@aphis.usda.gov. USDA will make every attempt to protect the confidentiality of any information sources during an investigation within the extent of the law.


A package sent to Hopewell Township-Washington Crossing, NJ, provided by post on MidJersey.News Facebook:



Press release from Virginia:

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) has been notified that several Virginia residents have received unsolicited packages containing seeds that appear to have originated from China. The types of seeds in the packages are unknown at this time and may be invasive plant species. The packages were sent by mail and may have Chinese writing on them.

Please do not plant these seeds. VDACS encourages anyone who has received unsolicited seeds in the mail that appears to have Chinese origin to contact the Office of Plant Industry Services (OPIS) at 804.786.3515 or through the ReportAPest@vdacs.virginia.gov email.

Invasive species wreak havoc on the environment, displace or destroy native plants and insects and severely damage crops. Taking steps to prevent their introduction is the most effective method of reducing both the risk of invasive species infestations and the cost to control and mitigate those infestations.


Trenton Water Works Issues 2020 Water Quality Report

Trenton Water serves Trenton, Ewing, Hamilton, Hopewell, Lawrence

June 29, 2020


SEE OTHER MIDJERSEY.NEWS Stories on Trenton Water Here:

Attorney General, DEP File Lawsuit Asking Court to Address Violations at Trenton Water Works that Pose Risks to Public Health

NJDEP Requests NJ Attorney General To File Legal Action Against Trenton For Failure To Comply With Safe Drinking Water Act


TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Water Works, the public water system that serves approximately 250,000 consumers in a five-municipality service area in Mercer County, today issued its 2020 Water Quality Report.

“The report provides an informative summary of our drinking water quality,” said Michael Walker, TWW’s Chief of Communications and Community Relations. “Consumers can also read about TWW’s work to reduce exposure to lead, our success in eliminating disinfection byproducts, active capital projects, and how our public water system operates.”

The 2020 Water Quality Report was mailed to TWW’s 63,000 customers, published online, and distributed to other parts of the water utility’s service area, as is required by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations. 

The report can be downloaded from TWW’s website at www.trentonwaterworks.org/ccr. Service-area residents can request a mailed report by phoning the Office of Communications and Community Relations at (609) 989-3033.

Attorney General, DEP File Lawsuit Asking Court to Address Violations at Trenton Water Works that Pose Risks to Public Health

June 15, 2020

DOWNLOAD COMPLAINT HERE:

www.nj.gov/oag/newsreleases20/TWW-Complaint.pdf

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal and Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Catherine R. McCabe announced today that the State has filed a lawsuit against the City of Trenton and Trenton Water Works seeking to compel them to take legally required actions to protect and strengthen the City’s water system, including actions necessary to reduce the risk of lead and pathogens in drinking water.

Trenton Water Works (TWW) supplies approximately 29 million gallons of drinking water daily to more than 200,000 people, including residents of Trenton and four neighboring municipalities – Ewing, Hamilton, Hopewell, and Lawrence Townships.

DEP and the City have, over the past decade, executed multiple Administrative Consent Orders (ACOs) in which Trenton agreed to cure its many failures to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act.  Among other things, TWW agreed to replace thousands of lead service lines and cover a finished water reservoir, actions that are necessary for TWW to comply with state and federal law and effectively minimize public health risks. However, due in part to the inaction of Trenton’s City Council, TWW has missed many critical deadlines, has not met its obligations to replace a significant portion of lead service lines, has failed to protect its open, 78-million-gallon reservoir of treated water from contamination and reduce the risk of pathogens in the water supply, and has failed to satisfy a series of other operations and maintenance obligations. Underlying this lawsuit is the Trenton City Council’s May 7, 2020 rejection of TWW’s request for millions of dollars to meet these clear legal obligations.

“After years of mismanagement, and after the Trenton City Council recently failed to take necessary steps to address the serious shortcomings in the City’s water system, the State was left with no choice but to file this suit,” said Attorney General Grewal. “Our lawsuit demands that TWW meet its obligations to reduce the risk of lead exposure by replacing lead service lines, and to comply with a range of other environmental laws that go directly to the health of the public and especially of Trenton’s children. New Jersey’s public water systems must be held to the highest standards and must live up to their environmental and public health obligations.”

“DEP’s singular goal is to ensure safe and reliable drinking water for the people served by Trenton Water Works,” said Commissioner Catherine R. McCabe. “DEP recognizes that Mayor Gusciora has made progress in improving TWW and protecting public health, and recently proposed plans that would enable the system to meet its Safe Drinking Water Act obligations. Unfortunately, in light of the Trenton City Council’s recent refusal to adequately fund drinking water system improvements, it has become all the more clear that TWW will not meet its obligations under the Safe Drinking Water Act and DEP’s orders.  DEP has been left no choice but to take legal action, and we have confidence that Attorney General Grewal and his team will help us bring swift relief to the people of Trenton and the communities who rely on TWW for their drinking water.”

Lead Service Lines Issue

As the Complaint explains, lead can occur in drinking water when lead service lines within water distribution systems and household plumbing corrode.

Wherever the lead levels exceed 15 parts per billion for a sufficient number of samples from a single water system — as revealed through tap water sampling — that system has experienced an “Action Level Exceedance” and federal law requires water systems to implement techniques to minimize the risk and to replace a percentage of its lead service lines.

According to today’s lawsuit, the City experienced lead-related Action Level Exceedance events during three monitoring periods in 2017 and 2018. TWW was required to replace seven percent of its lead service lines within a year of its first Action Level Exceedance. TWW did not meet that first deadline, and subsequently entered into an ACO with the DEP in July 2018.

Under that ACO, the TWW committed to replace seven percent of its lead lines – over 2,500 lines in all – by December 31, 2019. The City missed that deadline, and will miss an upcoming deadline in July to replace an additional seven percent of its lead lines, totaling 14%. To date, it has replaced only 828 of its lines, or roughly two percent.

As a result of the City’s failure to meet its agreed-upon obligation to replace many aged and corroding lead service lines, today’s lawsuit argues, DEP has been forced to seek court intervention.

The lawsuit asserts that legal action seeking a court order is required because the defendants have not taken all necessary steps to “mitigate the risk of potential lead contamination in drinking water.” The lawsuit also seeks immediate relief from the Court.

Remaining Environmental Issues

In addition to demanding that TWW replace sufficient lead service lines, the lawsuit addresses TWW’s failures to reduce the risk of contamination in its reservoir, as well as TWW’s inability to comply with other maintenance and operational requirements.

TWW maintains a seven-acre reserve reservoir, which contains millions of gallons of usable, treated water, and provides drinking water to consumers when the system is unable to meet demands. Because that reservoir is uncovered, it is subject to contamination from the elements and from birds or other animals, which poses a continuing risk of introducing pathogens into the water supply.

According to the Complaint filed today, DEP ordered installation of a floating cover to protect the reservoir from contamination more than a decade ago, and it ordered TWW to complete the cover project by 2009. The lawsuit notes that the City did not comply with DEP’s order, and that it missed two extended deadlines in the process.

As a result, in 2018, the City and DEP agreed to an ACO extending the deadline for cover installation until 2023 – with an added requirement that Trenton fulfill a number of interim milestones in 2018 and 2019 to ensure installation of the cover by the agreed-upon deadline.

According to today’s complaint, the City has not completed those steps in a timely manner, and now indicates it wishes to abandon the cover project in lieu of an alternative approach – a series of above ground storage tanks to prevent the contamination of its reserve water supply. To date, Trenton has not formally requested DEP approval of the storage tank project, which is projected to cost tens of millions of dollars. Nor has it provided a schedule for completion, or an indication of how it intends to fund the project.

At the same time, the ACO to which the City and DEP entered also required TWW to meet a series of operations and maintenance requirements, which it has repeatedly failed to do.

Most concerning, just last month, the Trenton City Council rejected TWW’s request for more than $83 million in bonds, which included $50 million for the protection of the finished water in the system, and which was also necessary to ensure that other maintenance and operations obligations are satisfied. That decision has necessitated today’s action; it is part of a pattern of inaction and outright refusal to marshal the resources necessary to meet the City’s legal obligations to effectively run the water system and protect the public health.

NJDEP Requests NJ Attorney General To File Legal Action Against Trenton For Failure To Comply With Safe Drinking Water Act

Trenton Water supplies 217,000 people in Trenton, Ewing, Hamilton, Hopewell and Lawrence Townships.

May 22, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Hamilton Mayor Jeff Martin released a statement today about NJ Department of Environmental Protection taking legal action against the City of Trenton.

Trenton Water Works provides water for a significant portion of Hamilton Township.

“I applaud DEP for its leadership in ensuring safe and clean drinking water for all of Trenton Water Works’ customers. Legal action is a necessary but unfortunate step to take. We will join, and work with, DEP in its legal action and will not stop fighting until we are satisfied that all necessary steps are taken.” Hamilton Township Mayor Martin Said.

Full letter from NJ DEP Commissioner below.

MidJersey.News has reached out to Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora’s office for comment but has not received a reply at the time of this publishing. Once we receive a reply we will update it here.


Dear Mayor and Council President,

As you know, for over the past two years, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has been working both to press for and to support the City of Trenton’s efforts to meet its obligations under the Safe Drinking Water Act and two 2018 DEP Administrative Consent Orders (ACOs) requiring, among other things, improvements to the operations of Trenton Water Works (TWW), replacement of lead service lines, and renovating Trenton’s uncovered reservoir to prevent contamination of the drinking water supply.

At the time of my last letter to you dated February 20, 2020 (attached), DEP was encouraged by the City’s recent progress in meeting its obligations, and by the Mayor’s proposed capital improvement plan and rate ordinance changes needed to support those improvements. And, as I shared in February, DEP is pleased to offer more state water infrastructure funding to support the City’s efforts, adding to the state funds we previously provided to the City.

I was deeply disappointed to learn that, on May 7, 2020, the City Council inexplicably rejected funding for crucial measures necessary to enable TWW to come into and maintain compliance. To be clear, the Council’s inexplicable failure to adopt these measures will prevent TWW from meeting critically overdue legal requirements of the ACOs and the Safe Drinking Water Act.

These requirements are necessary to ensure a safe and reliable water supply, not only for the City of Trenton, but also for the 217,000 people served by TWW in Ewing, Hamilton, Hopewell and Lawrence Townships.

The Council’s unreasonable action has left DEP no choice but to seek judicial intervention to help ensure that the City will comply with the requirements of the ACOs and the Safe Drinking Water Act. Regrettably, DEP has requested that the Attorney General take appropriate action before the courts.

Ensuring safe and reliable drinking water is a critical public health priority, and it is imperative that the City’s recent progress toward meeting its obligations not be lost. While DEP must now take the unfortunate step of seeking judicial intervention, we also recognize that Mayor Gusciora
has proposed appropriate actions to enable TWW to make the necessary improvements to its water supply system. The City Council’s refusal to provide the necessary financial support to achieve these legally required public health obligations simply leaves us no other choice.

DEP will, of course, continue to provide TWW with technical compliance assistance, as we do for all water systems. And, I invite you to contact me directly if you would like to discuss these matters.

Catherine R. McCabe NJDEP, Commissioner



The following is a statement from Hamilton Township Mayor Jeff Martin:

“I applaud DEP for its leadership in ensuring safe and clean drinking water for all of Trenton Water Works’ customers. Legal action is a necessary but unfortunate step to take. We will join, and work with, DEP in its legal action and will not stop fighting until we are satisfied that all necessary steps are taken.”


Letter sent to Trenton Mayor and Council President from Catherine R. McCabe NJDEP, Commissioner planing legal action.


Salute To Healthcare Workers At Capital Health Hopewell Campus

May 1, 2020

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–This afternoon a 100 vehicle Salute to Healthcare Workers was held at Capital Health Hopewell Campus. Police, fire, road departments and others drove around the main entrance to the hospital at shift change to show appreciation to those who serve in the healthcare field during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Additional content provided by: Brian McCarthy OnScene News

Thunderbirds and Blue Angels Fly Over In “Operation America Strong”

April 28, 2020

TRENTON AND MERCER COUNTY, NJ–The U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, the Thunderbirds, and the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, honored frontline COVID-19 responders and essential workers with formation flights over New York City, Newark, Trenton and Philadelphia today.

Previous MidJersey.News story on the event

Photos of Operation America Strong from the Trenton Area today:

Flight Plan For Operation “America Strong” For April 28, 2020 Released

April 27, 2020

NAS PENSACOLA, Fla. – The U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, the Thunderbirds, and the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, will honor frontline COVID-19 responders and essential workers with formation flights over New York City, Newark, Trenton and Philadelphia April 28. The flight plans have been released to the public this morning and can be viewed below.

See previous Stories on the event here:

Thunderbirds, Blue Angels to Salute New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania COVID-19 Responders Tuesday April 28, 2020

President Donald J. Trump Announces “Operation America Strong” Thunderbirds and Blue Angels Fly Over Airshows Coming To A City Near You

Blue Angels and Thunderbird Combined Fly-By Event Is In “Planning Stage” – Will Not Be Today

Mosquito Spraying In Mercer County Today

April 22, 2020

See Mercer County DOT Notice Here

Aerial Mosquito Larviciding Notice 

When: (Wednesday) April 22, 2020, between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. (weather permitting)

Mercer County Mosquito Control will be treating larval mosquito habitats throughout the county by way of helicopter. Due to their large size and inaccessibility by ground vehicles, these larval habitats are routinely treated with a helicopter when mosquitoes are present in the standing water. You may see our helicopter flying near residential areas, positioning the helicopter to approach nearby areas of standing water targeted for treatment.

***PLEASE NOTE***

THIS IS NOT an area-wide Adulticiding “MOSQUITO SPRAYING” activity. 

Aerial larviciding includes the use of target-specific, biorational granules only released directly above standing water to help prevent larval mosquitoes from developing into biting adult mosquitoes.

Adulticide applications (spraying) are conducted when biting adult mosquito populations exceed public health or nuisance thresholds. These applications are conducted via truck-mounted, ultra-low-volume (ULV) cold aerosol sprayers during late evening or early morning hours. Mercer County applies products (adulticides) recommended by Rutgers University  for mosquito control in New Jersey, and a complete list with accompanying labels and MSDS sheets can be found here. Specific street addresses are not published, but adulticide applications are conducted on an area-wide basis and targets where adult mosquito populations may be concentrated during application times. For further questions or information, please browse our website or call/email directly. The office maintains no regular “spraying schedule” or “spraying list.” These applications are only conducted when deemed absolutely necessary, and under the appropriate environmental conditions, in order to bring mosquito populations to tolerable levels or to ward off potential mosquito-borne disease outbreaks.

Penn Medicine, Princeton Medical Center, Hospital Worker Appreciation

April 11, 2020

Photos, video and story by: Dennis Symons, Jr.

PLAINSBORO, NJ (MIDDLESEX)–A COVID-19 hospital worker appreciation event was held tonight at the Penn Medicine, Princeton Medical Center at Plainsboro. Firefighters, police, EMS showed appreciation to hospital workers at shift change. The event kicked off with a parade of police cars, fire trucks and ambulances that circled the medical center. Firefighters ladder trucks raised them and flew flags as workers arrived and left work.

At the employee entrance police, fire and EMS applauded hospital workers in appreciation. Superheros handed handed out many boxes of pizza.

Spider-Man, Superman, The Hulk, Captain America, Easter Bunny, Santa Claus were all on scene for this event.

Partial list of fire apparatus at the event:

Plainsboro Tower 49, Princeton Tower 60, Princeton Jct Tower 44, Monmouth Jct Tower 20, Montgomery Tower 46, Hightstown Ladder 41, Kendal Park Ladder 22, North Brunswick Tower 2, East Brunswick Tower 709, Monroe Tower 51, East Windsor TW42, East Windsor TS 46, Jamesburg TS 42-J-10, North Brunswick Engine Co 1, Griggstown Rescue-Engine 35, Little Rocky Hill (possibly Engine or Rescue), Rocky Hill Engine 53, Kingston Engine 24, West Windsor Fire Police, West Windsor Engine 43, Spotswood Engine 71, Hopewell SS52
NJSP – NORTH STAR (740-750 circle & fly-by)
Plainsboro Engine 49, Princeton Ladder 60, Monroe Tower 57, Monroe Ladder 23,  North Brunswick Ladder 3, Hopewell Ladder 52, West Windsor Ladder 43

Pizza was from Romeos Pizza (Plainsboro) and Maninos 3 (Hamilton).

All firefighters, police, EMS as well as hospital workers wore PPE such as N95 masks or other covering along with gloves depending on duties.

Mercer County COVID-19 Testing Site Opens Tuesday By Appointment Only

March 28, 2020

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)– Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes today announced that the County, in collaboration with health care partners, will open an appointment-only, drive-up testing site for COVID-19 on Tuesday, March 31, at Quaker Bridge Mall in Lawrence

The testing center is by appointment only for symptomatic Mercer County residents age 18 or older who have a prescription from their primary health care provider (PCP). If you are symptomatic for COVID-19 and want to be tested, contact your PCP.

The testing center, which initially will be open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., is a collaborative effort between the County of Mercer, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Hamilton, Capital Health System, St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton and the Trenton Health Team.

“Testing for COVID-19 is necessary to identify and isolate people with infections,” said Mr. Hughes. “When it comes to setting up a testing site, we face the same challenges as do other jurisdictions, such as securing testing kits and the personal protective equipment for staff. I thank the County’s Office of Emergency Management, our health care partners, Quaker Bridge Mall management and the leadership at Lawrence Township for clearing the hurdles necessary to get this site online.”

Mercer County has contracted with Bio-Reference Laboratories, which will provide testing for individuals who are symptomatic and have been scheduled through their PCP.

To be eligible for testing, an individual must be examined by a PCP. The PCP will determine the need for the test based on symptoms. No one should be tested without being symptomatic. If the PCP deems a test is necessary, they will fax a prescription to the Mercer County call center with the patient’s phone number. Staff will then call the patient, take registration information and schedule an appointment, providing testing site instructions.

For the health, safety and security of staff at the site, patients will not be permitted to leave their vehicles. Walk-ups are not permitted. If you believe you may have symptoms of COVID-19, the State of New Jersey’s COVID-19 Information Hub provides a self-assessment tool that will help you determine whether you should be tested. Visit self.covid19.nj.gov.

Photo of the testing center getting set up at Quakerbridge Mall as seen today March 28, 2020 Photo by MidJersey.news corespondent Greg Griffis

Governor Murphy, Governor Cuomo, and Governor Lamont Announce Regional Approach to Combatting COVID-19

March 16, 2020

The three States will limit crowd capacity for recreational and social gatherings to 50 people – effective by 8 PM tonight 

Restaurants and bars will close for on premise service and move to take-out and delivery only effective 8 PM tonight

Movie theaters, gyms and casinos will temporarily close effective 8 PM tonight

Uniform approach to social distancing will slow spread of COVID-19 throughout the tri-state area

PRESS RELEASE FROM GOV. MURPHY’S OFFICE: TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)—Amid a lack of federal direction and nationwide standards, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, and Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont today announced a regional approach to combatting the novel coronavirus – or COVID-19 – throughout the tri-state area.

These uniform standards will limit crowd capacity for social and recreational gatherings to 50 people, effective 8 PM tonight. This follows updated guidance that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued yesterday recommending the cancellation or postponement of in-person events consisting of 50 people or more.

The three governors also announced restaurants and bars will close for on premise service and move to take-out and delivery services only. These establishments will be provided a waiver for carry-out alcohol. These measures will take effect at 8 PM tonight.

Finally, the three governors said they will temporarily close movie theaters, gyms and casinos, effective at 8 PM tonight. 

This uniform approach to social distancing is meant to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19. 

Governor Murphy said, “With all we are seeing in our state – and across our nation and around the world – the time for us to take our strongest, and most direct, actions to date to slow the spread of coronavirus is now. I’ve said many times over the past several days that, in our state, we are going to get through this as one New Jersey family. But if we’re all in this together, we must work with our neighboring states to act together. The work against coronavirus isn’t just up to some of us, it’s up to all of us.”

“Our primary goal right now is to slow the spread of this virus so that the wave of new infections doesn’t crash our healthcare system, and everyone agrees social distancing is the best way to do that,” Governor Cuomo said. “This is not a war that can be won alone, which is why New York is partnering with our neighboring states to implement a uniform standard that not only keeps our people safe but also prevents ‘state shopping’ where residents of one state travel to another and vice versa. I have called on the federal government to implement nationwide protocols but in their absence we are taking this on ourselves.”

Governor Lamont said, “The only way to effectively fight the spread of COVID-19 is by working together as states. We have shared interests, and a patchwork of closures and restrictions is not the best way forward. I know that because of this collaboration, we will save lives.” 

Census 2020 Survey Is Arriving By Mail

March 13, 2020

By: Dennis Symons, Jr.

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)—The 2020 Census count is underway and I received my invitation by mail today. As per the instructions I logged onto My2020census.gov and entered my code Census ID Code. There were some very basic questions of who was living in the home and birthdays. It was one of the easiest census forms I have ever completed and took less than two minutes to complete from start to finish, even though it says it could take an average of 10 minutes to complete.

The Census is counted every 10 years and many things from voting districts, financial aid, Federal, State and Local government services and more use this government data. A response is required by law and should be very easy to complete if you have received the invitation from United States Census Bureau.

Frequently asked questions of the Census Bureau:

  1. What is the 2020 Census?The goal of the census is to count every person living in the United States, once, only once and in the right place. Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution mandates that this population and housing count occur every 10 years. Census data guide how more than $675 billion of federal funding is distributed to states and communities each year.
  2. Am I required to respond to the 2020 Census?Yes, you are required by law to respond to the 2020 Census (Title 13, U.S. Code, Sections 141 and 193). We are conducting the 2020 Census under the authority of Title 13, U.S. Code, Sections 141, 193 and 221. This collection of information has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The eight-digit OMB approval number is 0607-1006. If this number were not displayed, we could not conduct the census.
  3. Are my answers confidential and private?Yes. The Census Bureau is required by law to protect your information. The Census Bureau is not permitted to publicly release your responses in a way that could identify you or your household. Per the Federal Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2015, your data are protected from cybersecurity risks through screening of the systems that transmit your data. All web data submissions are encrypted in order to protect your privacy.Title 13 of the U.S. Code protects the confidentiality of all your information. Violating the confidentiality of a respondent is a federal crime with serious penalties, including a federal prison sentence of up to five years, a fine of up to $250,000, or both. Only authorized individuals have access to the stored data, and the information you provide to the Census Bureau may only be used by a restricted number of authorized individuals who are sworn for life to protect the confidentiality of your individual responses. Your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.For more information about how we protect your information, please visit our website at census.gov and click on “Data Protection and Privacy Policy” at the bottom of the home page. This page also includes information about the collection, storage, and use of these records. Click on “System of Records Notices (SORN)” and look for Privacy Act System of Records Notice COMMERCE/CENSUS-5, Decennial Census Program.
  4. Who should complete the 2020 Census questionnaire?This 2020 Census questionnaire should be completed by the person who owns or rents the living quarters or any other person who is at least 15 years of age with knowledge of the household.
  5. How do I change my answers?For questions where you must choose a single response from a list, clicking another response will change your answer to that response.If it is a “select all that apply” question, you may click on a selected check box to unselect the box and remove it as one of your answers.
  6. How long will the 2020 Census questionnaire take?The Census Bureau estimates that completing the questionnaire will take 10 minutes on average.
  7. How will the Census Bureau use the information I provide?By law, the Census Bureau can only use your responses to produce statistics.
  8. Is it safe to complete the 2020 Census questionnaire online?Yes. For each online questionnaire, we are required to provide an explanation to respondents about the confidentiality of the data and the laws that protect those data (e.g., Title 13, U.S. Code Section 9 (a)).Per the Federal Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2015, your data are protected from cybersecurity risks through screening of the systems that transmit your data. All web data submissions are encrypted in order to protect your privacy, even in the remote chance that your responses are intercepted.More information on this topic can be found on the Data Protection and Privacy Policy webpage (http://www.census.gov/privacy/).
  9. Will the results be published?Yes. By law, the Census Bureau can only use your responses to produce statistics. The Census Bureau is not permitted to publicly release your responses in a way that could identify you or your household. The Census Bureau plans to make results of this study available to the general public. Results will be presented in aggregate form and no personally identifiable information will be published.Information quality is an integral part of the pre-dissemination review of the information disseminated by the Census Bureau (fully described in the Census Bureau’s Information Quality Guidelines at https://www.census.gov/about/policies/quality/guidelines.html). Information quality is also integral to the information collection conducted by the Census Bureau and is incorporated into the clearance process by the Paperwork Reduction Act.
  10. Do I have to complete the 2020 Census questionnaire for my household members?Yes, you will be asked to provide information for each household member.

Prescribed Burning In Mercer County Today And Other Areas

February 24, 2020

Today, February 24, the New Jersey Forest Fire Service will be conducting prescribed burning operations in the following areas.

DIVISION A

Mercer County – Mercer Meadows

DIVISION B

Ocean County
– Little Egg Harbor – Stafford Forge Road
– Barnegat – Greenwood Wildlife Management Area
– Lacey – Double Trouble State Park

DIVISION C

Atlantic County
– Buena Vista – Highland Ave/Old Landis Ave
– Estell Manor – River Road
Camden County
– Waterford – Wharton State Forest

This schedule is weather dependent and subject to change.

If in doubt about the source of smoke or fire, call 9-1-1 or 877-WARN-DEP (877-927-6337).

More information about prescribed burning can be found here: https://www.nj.gov/dep/newsrel/2019/19_0029.htm

Mercer County Wrestling Tournament

February 2, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–The Mercer County Wrestling Tournament was held today at Robbinsville High School. Joey Lamparelli (Allentown) received the 2020 Most Outstanding Wrestler award. (more to follow on Joey). Hopewell Valley High School was first place team.

Individual Results 1st through 6th:

106 Pounds

  • 1st Place – Shailen Savur of Robbinsville
  • 2nd Place – Robert Fattore of Hightstown
  • 3rd Place – Nicholas Ricigliano of Steinert
  • 4th Place – Chloë Ayres of Princeton
  • 5th Place – Kyle Doherty of Hopewell Valley
  • 6th Place – Johnae Drumright of Trenton Central
106 Pounds

113 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Sudesh Gurung of Nottingham
  • 2nd Place – Christian Micikas of Hopewell Valley
  • 3rd Place – Cory Stallworth of Trenton Central
  • 4th Place – Martin Brophy of Princeton
  • 5th Place – Aiden Weil of Robbinsville
  • 6th Place – Rommel Mendez of Lawrence

120 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Joey Lamparelli of Allentown
  • 2nd Place – Jacob Venezia of Hopewell Valley
  • 3rd Place – Dylan Cifrodelli of Robbinsville
  • 4th Place – Joseph Obst of Hightstown
  • 5th Place – Silvia Aparicio of Hamilton West
  • 6th Place – Gavin White of Notre Dame

126 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Drake Torrington of Robbinsville
  • 2nd Place – Allen Lopez of Hopewell Valley
  • 3rd Place – Anthony Verdi of Steinert
  • 4th Place – Giovanni Morina of Hightstown
  • 5th Place – Kolin O`Grady of Allentown
  • 6th Place – Bakhtiyar Bajwa of Lawrence
126 Pounds

132 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Kether Thornton of Hightstown
  • 2nd Place – chris Sockler of Princeton
  • 3rd Place – Cole Cifrodelli of Robbinsville
  • 4th Place – Joe Vannozzi of Hopewell Valley
  • 5th Place – Alexander Samayoa of Ewing
  • 6th Place – David Aboasu of Nottingham
132 Pounds

138 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Aaron Munford of Princeton
  • 2nd Place – Alejandro Lopez of Hopewell Valley
  • 3rd Place – Mason Louderback of Notre Dame
  • 4th Place – Isaiah Lederman of Robbinsville
  • 5th Place – Reece Schenck of Lawrence
  • 6th Place – Isaiah Thornton of Hightstown
138 Pounds

145 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – dominic Riendeau-Krause of Princeton
  • 2nd Place – Careem Frost of Lawrence
  • 3rd Place – Elijah Rodriguez of Hightstown
  • 4th Place – Owen Weigle of Ewing
  • 5th Place – Andrew Nixon of Hamilton West
  • 6th Place – Jeremy Murray of Robbinsville
145 Pounds

152 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – james romaine of Princeton
  • 2nd Place – Matt Paglia of Allentown
  • 3rd Place – Sean Mills of Lawrence
  • 4th Place – Brian Zeglarski of Hopewell Valley
  • 5th Place – RJ Stradling of Robbinsville
  • 6th Place – Robert Doss of Hightstown
152 Pounds

160 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Nicholas Golden of Allentown
  • 2nd Place – Alex Stavrou of Hightstown
  • 3rd Place – Kwanir Edwards of Nottingham
  • 4th Place – Te`amo Nazario of Trenton Central
  • 5th Place – Ben Shevlin of Hopewell Valley
  • 6th Place – matt elsworth of Princeton
160 Pounds

170 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Ryan Bennett of Hamilton West
  • 2nd Place – Jake Dallarda of Lawrence
  • 3rd Place – Tommy Zovich of West Windsor-Plainsboro North
  • 4th Place – Nicodemus Leaver of Hightstown
  • 5th Place – Gael Vasquez of Hopewell Valley
  • 6th Place – Manuel Roman of Nottingham
170 Pounds

182 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Josh Beigman of Hopewell Valley
  • 2nd Place – Connor Verga of Lawrence
  • 3rd Place – Paskal Miga of Allentown
  • 4th Place – Dorian Henry of Nottingham
  • 5th Place – Ireayo Kuku of West Windsor-Plainsboro South
  • 6th Place – Clayton Resch of Steinert
182 Pounds

195 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Chris Stavrou of Hightstown
  • 2nd Place – Brian LaCross of Hopewell Valley
  • 3rd Place – Timothy Glynn of West Windsor-Plainsboro North
  • 4th Place – Jaylen Bynes of Notre Dame
  • 5th Place – Jayson Williams of Trenton Central
  • 6th Place – Ricardo Cruz of Lawrence
195 Pounds

220 Pounds:

  • 1st Place – Bryan Bonilla of Hightstown
  • 2nd Place – Christian Cacciabaudo of Hopewell Valley
  • 3rd Place – Daniel Schweitzer of Allentown
  • 4th Place – Eric Brown of Trenton Central
  • 5th Place – Jonathan Jupiter of Nottingham
  • 6th Place – Mohamed Abdelatty of Lawrence

Heavyweight:

  • 1st Place – Brenden Hansen of Hightstown
  • 2nd Place – Matthew Moore of West Windsor-Plainsboro North
  • 3rd Place – John Snyder of Hopewell Valley
  • 4th Place – Jacob VanDenBogart of Allentown
  • 5th Place – Mateo Cruz of Robbinsville
  • 6th Place – Moaamen Nasr of Lawrence
Heavyweight

Wrestling: Robbinsville 17 Hopewell 48

January 28, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)—The Robbinsville High School wrestling team fell to Hopewell Valley tonight 48-17

120 lbs. Robbinsville Michael Maneri, Hopewell Allen Lopez (Pin 2:22)

126 lbs. Robbinsville Bylan Cifordeli, Hopwell Jacob Venezia (w)

132 lbs. Robbinsville Isaiah Leaderman, Hopewell Joey Knozzi (w)

138 lbs. Robbinsville Drake Torrington (w), Hopewell A. Lopez

145 lbs. Robbinsville Cole Cifrodelli(w), Hopewell Larry Kennedy

152 lbs. Robbinsville RJ Stradling, Hopewell Brian Zeglarski (w)

160 lbs. Robbinsville Jeremy Murray, Hopewell Ben Berlin (pin 0:20)

170 lbs. Robbinsville Nicholas Migllardio, Hopewell G. Vasquez (w)

182 lbs.  Robbinsville FFT, Hopewell Josh Beigman

195 lbs.  Robbinsville Thomas Jennings, Hopewell Brian Lacross (pin 2:42)

220 lbs.  Robbinsville FFT, Hopewell Christian Cacciabudo

Heavyweight Robbinsville Mateo Cruz (w), Hopewell John Snyder

106 lbs. Robbinsville Shailen Savur (pin 2:58), Hopewell Kyle Doherty

113 lbs. Robbinsville Aiden Weil, Hopewell Christian Micihes (pin 3:03)

Mercer County Police Academy Graduation, Basic Recruit Class # 22-19

Photos and story by: Brian McCarthy

WEST WINDSOR, NJ (MERCER)–Friends and families packed the gymnasium at Mercer County Community College for Mercer County Police Academy, graduation exercises held for the Basic Recruit Class # 22-19. Marty P. Masseroni Director, Detective Robert Gioscio Chief Instructor, Inv. Michael Winget Staff Instructor, Rene Mastroianni Staff Secretary, Detective Dennis Schuster (Retired) Range Master Sheriff’s-Liaison, Brian Hughes County Executive, Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo J. Onofri, John Kemler Mercer County Sheriff Board Chairman, Chief Lance Maloney President Chief’s of Police Association and Dr. Jianting Wang President of Mercer County College.


Mercer County Press Release:

WEST WINDSOR—Sixty-one cadets who made up the 22nd basic class of police officers took part in today’s Mercer County Police Academy commencement held in the gymnasium at Mercer County Community College (MCCC).

An audience of several hundred family members, friends, Mercer County dignitaries and law enforcement officials from around State of New Jersey saw the cadets receive graduation certificates to officially make them police officers.

The graduates endured 21 weeks of training at the academy in all aspects of law enforcement and will now serve in police agencies within Mercer County and elsewhere (see complete list below). The academy, which was created in October 2006, is located on the grounds of MCCC.

Michael Flanagan, who will join the New Jersey Transit Police Department and was chosen by his fellow graduates as class speaker, told the gathering that he was inspired by a Police Academy instructor’s pep talk in which he asked the cadets if they knew why police officers train so hard. “It’s because we always win … we have to.”

“Mercer Class 22-19, I want you to leave this graduation today with the mindset that we always win,” Officer Flanagan said. “Maintain your physical fitness because we always win. Keep up on your case law because we always win. Take your in-service training seriously because we always win. Know what’s around you 360 because we always win. While on this job, stay locked in and do not get complacent, because you always have to win.”

Also addressing the class were Police Academy Director Martin Masseroni, Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes, Mercer County Sheriff John A. Kemler, Hopewell Township Police Chief Lance Maloney, president of the Mercer County Chiefs of Police Association; and Dr. Jianping Wang, MCCC president. Also in attendance were Freeholders Ann Cannon, John Cimino and Lucylle Walter.

During training, the class studied in disciplines such as use of force, firearms, vehicle pursuit, hostage negotiation, advanced crime scene processing and domestic violence prevention, among others. Several cadets received awards at the graduation ceremony for their excellence in training. Ethan Fisher, Somerset County Sheriff’s Office, was chosen by his classmates to receive the Certificate of Merit awarded by the N.J. Police Training Commission to the best all-around graduate. Officer Fisher also received the academic award; Ayaz Kahn, New Jersey Transit Police Department, and Danae Rebelo, Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office, both earned the firearms qualification award with perfect scores; Alyssa DiPierro, Trenton Police Department, and Thomas Tramontana, Mercer County Sheriff’s Office, both received the physical training award; and Jonathan White, New Jersey Transit Police Department, received the emergency vehicle operations award.

The Mercer Police Academy consists of two classrooms specially designed for the needs of law enforcement training, and recruits use MCCC grounds, its library and its gymnasium for training purposes. The campus includes a padded training room that is used for “defensive tactics” classes. A shooting range in Hopewell Township operated by the prosecutor’s office is part of the academy as well.

The following is a list of the graduates, their hometowns and the law enforcement agency each will join. (Alternate Route trainees attend the academy at their own expense and now can pursue employment as a certified police officer.)

Alternate Route: Ahmet Ekiz, Hamilton; Arthur Juba, South River; Anthony Leone, Springfield; William Revesz, Montgomery; and Tyler Vandergrift, Hamilton

Hamilton Township Police Division: Gregory Danley, Hamilton

Hunterdon County Sheriff’s Office: Timothy Althamer, Flemington

Lawrence Township Police Department: Nigel Davis and Michael Hammond, both of Lawrence

Linden Police Department: Michael Linebaugh and Antoine Suggs, both of Linden

Mercer County Sheriff’s Office: Tyler Beers, Hamilton; Alesha Bethea, Trenton; Anthony Herold, Lawrence; Dylan Tallman, Hamilton; Thomas Tramontana, Hamilton; and Lawrence Windsor, Lawrence

Middlesex County Sheriff’s Office: Taylor Clanton, Piscataway; Jaquan Cook, New Brunswick; Devin Gray, Milltown; Lawrence Lenahan, Sayreville; Jennifer Lukacs, Perth Amboy; Christian Paez, Sayreville; Helder Paredes, Monroe; Danae Rebelo, Middlesex; Islam Saad, Sayreville; Jessica Tymitz, Woodbridge; Jeremy Vargas, Woodbridge; and Antonios Zaferellis, South River

New Jersey Transit Police Department: Mohammed Ahmed, Haledon; Michael Baloga, North Arlington; Michael Dowdy, Irvington; Michael Flanagan, Jersey City; Sean Gallagher, Belvidere; Paul Gawin, Saddlebrook; Kevin Guy, Fairlawn; Katherine Hormaza, Morristown; Ayaz Kahn, Nutley; Kevin Kolbenschlag, Brick; Joseph Mastropfilipo, Paramus; Christopher Montalvo, Bloomfield; Matthew Reiter, Manalapan; Elias Statham, Bayonne; Jonathan White, Jefferson; and Jonathan Ydo, Bloomfield

Somerset County Sheriff’s Office: Ethan Fisher, Branchburg; and Kyle Lippincott, Milford

Trenton Police Department: Michael Cahill, Lawrence; Julio Casso, Hamilton; Alyssa DiPierro, Hamilton; Austin Fountain, Hamilton; Michael Giovannetti, Ewing; Scott Hussey, Hamilton; Michael Kovacs, Hamilton; Alyssa Mantuano, Hamilton; Matthew Martindell, Hamilton; Jeffrey Pownall, Yardville; Michael Tylutki, Hamilton, Christopher Vitoritt, Hamilton; Brandon Walker, Hamilton; and Justin Walker, Hamilton