Category: Hopewell

Shop Rite And One Tree Plant 125 Saplings In Rosedale Park

The project is part of an effort to plant 25,000 trees in areas where ShopRite stores operate.

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April 21, 2021

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP – PENNINGTON, NJ (MERCER)–Volunteers from ShopRite and One Tree Planted branched out across Rosedale Park in Pennington, NJ on April 19 to help create a more sustainable future by planting 125 saplings as part of ShopRite’s ongoing efforts to plant 25,000 trees in areas where our stores operate. 

Equipped with gloves, shovels and an array of other tools, volunteers dug holes, planted trees and erected deer fencing to ensure the saplings would have the best chance to take root and thrive.  The tree planting initiative, now in its third year, will result in 75,000 trees being planted in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware and Maryland by the end of the year.

“Our annual tree planting event is a highlight of our sustainability efforts that are designed to promote a greener, cleaner and more beautiful environment for future generations,” said Robert Zuehlke, Manager of Corporate Social Responsibility for ShopRite.  “We are proud to partner with One Tree Planted to help bring 75,000 trees to states across the mid-Atlantic.”

The benefits of trees include moderating climate, improving air quality, reducing storm water runoff, and harboring wildlife. They also serve as a windbreak, provide protection from rainfall, and act as a filter for the air we breathe by removing dust and releasing oxygen. Trees also have social benefits that include having a calming effect that reduces stress and fatigue, while also promoting healing.

“We’re proud of our continued partnership with ShopRite,” said Matt Hill, Chief Environmental Evangelist at One Tree Planted. “Thanks to our shared commitment to the environment we’re able to plant trees across the US, protect biodiversity and water quality, and get the local community involved.”

For more than four decades, Wakefern Food Corp., the retailer owned cooperative that includes nearly 280 ShopRite stores, has worked to protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and assist communities where our stores operate.  Last year alone, Wakefern donated 5,000 tons of food to local food banks, composted more than 8,200 tons of food waste, and since the late 1970’s has recycled more than 2.6 million tons of materials. 

For more information on how ShopRite is celebrating Earth Day, and our ongoing sustainability efforts, please visit:  www.shoprite.com/earthmonth2021, and https://shop.shoprite.com/sustainability

UPDATE: Reports indicate up to 3 different stabbings at Mercer County Correctional Facility since Friday

February 8, 2021

By: Tyler Eckel

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP (MERCER)– A County official has confirmed two violent cases that took place at the Mercer County Correctional Facility, sending three inmates to the hospital.

At about 11:30 Monday morning, four inmates engaged in a physical altercation. Two of these inmates were transported to the hospital, however the extent of injuries are unknown. The incident remains under investigation.

This comes just three days after a separate incident sent one inmate to the hospital. On February 5 at approximately 4:30 pm, two inmates engaged in a physical altercation, which left one with a stab wound. The inmate was transported to Capital Health Trauma Center. This incident also remains under investigation.

A close source also tells MidJersey.News that there has been three separate stabbing incidents since Friday, however we are waiting for confirmation on the incident.

This story is still developing and if more information becomes available, the story will be updated.


See MidJersey.News’ breaking news story here: BREAKING: Person stabbed at Mercer County Correctional Facility, 2nd victim this week



BREAKING: Person stabbed at Mercer County Correctional Facility, 2nd victim this week

February 8, 2021

By: Tyler Eckel


See MidJersey.News’ updated story here: UPDATE: Reports indicate up to 3 different stabbings at Mercer County Correctional Facility since Friday


BREAKING NEWS REPORT: This is a breaking news report with information received from radio traffic and close sources. Once official information is received, updates and corrections will be made.

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP (MERCER)– One person was reportedly stabbed at the Mercer County Correctional Facility located at 1750 River Road sometime shortly before 11:30 am Monday. It was requested the victim to be airlifted to the hospital, however it is unknown at this time if they went by ground or by air.

This stabbing marks the second stabbing at the Corrections Facility this week, after another person was reportedly stabbed shortly before 5:00 pm on February 5th.

No further information is available at this time. Please check back later.



Mercer County Narcotics Task Force Investigation Leads to Three Arrests, 11 Guns and Methamphetamine

January 28, 2021

Published by: Tyler Eckel

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP (MERCER)– The Mercer County Narcotics Task Force (MCNTF) concluded a month-long investigation  this week with three arrests and the seizure of 11 guns, high-capacity rifle magazines,  hundreds of rounds of ammunition and approximately $1,000 in methamphetamine,  Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo J. Onofri reported. 

At approximately 5:45 p.m. on Wednesday, January 27, members of the New Jersey  State Police TEAMS Unit, the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office, the Mercer County  Sheriff’s Office, the Hamilton Township Police Division, the Trenton Police Department,  the Drug Enforcement Administration and U.S. Homeland Security Investigations, under  the command of the prosecutor’s Special Investigations Unit, executed a search warrant  for the residence of 255 Route 31 Northbound in Hopewell. During the search warrant  execution, residents Charlene Else and Carmen Morelli were located and detained in the  rear yard. Bobbi Lynn Sensinger, also a resident, was located and detained in the second  floor front bedroom. 

A subsequent search of the residence revealed eight long guns and three handguns,  including a loaded Browning Arms .22 caliber rifle, a loaded Winchester Model 94 3030  lever action rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun, a Winchester Model 1917 bolt action rifle, an Iver  Johnson 12-guage single shot shotgun, a Remington Model S12 bolt action .22 caliber  rifle, an Ithaca double barrel 12-gauge shotgun, a Marlin bolt action Model SS 12-gauge

shotgun, a Haus Firearm Company .22 caliber revolver handgun, a loaded Raven Arms  MP-25 handgun and a Para Ha semi-automatic handgun.  

Detectives also seized seven 30-round AR style rifle magazines, hundreds of rounds of  assorted ammunition, 10 grams of methamphetamine with an approximate street value  of $1,000, drug packaging materials and $2,150 in cash. 

Else, 58, Morelli, 45, and Sensinger, 45, were each charged with numerous narcotic- and  weapons-related offenses, and lodged at the Mercer County Correction Center pending  future court proceedings. 

Despite having been charged, all persons are presumed innocent until found guilty  beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law. 



BREAKING: House Fire Extinguished In Hopewell Township

January 24, 2021

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Around 9:40 am Hopewell Township along with several other area fire departments were dispatched to the 400 Block of Lambertville Hopewell Road for a house fire. The first arriving fire officer on scene reported smoke from the structure calling for a 1st alarm and a 2nd Alarm tanker task force was called to the scene. This is remote a non-fire hydrant area and water needs to be trucked in by tankers.

There were reports of advancing a 2 1/2 inch line to the second floor along with other hand lines. The fire was under control by 10:17 am. A witness photo provided from the driveway and the street shows that fire was though the roof at one point during the fire and it appears that the majority of the home was saved.

Departments from Mercer, Hunterdon and Middlesex responded to the scene of the fire.

This is a breaking news story from radio reports and witnesses on scene once official information is received the story will be updated and any additions and corrections made.



Mercer County Sheriff Warns Of Phone Scam

January 22, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Once again, Mercer County Sheriff Jack Kemler has issued a warning to area residents regarding telephone scammers posing as Mercer County Sheriff’s Officers. Over the past month, the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office has received numerous complaints about suspected phone scams asking residents for personal bank account information or cash payments. Some calls have reached residents throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The scammers identify themselves as Mercer County Sheriff’s Officers along with fictitious badge numbers. The callers state they have an arrest warrant related to money laundering charges and need access to their bank accounts. The scammers also suggest meeting at a location and to bring cash for bail or fines. Otherwise, they will be taken into custody. “I can state with confidence the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office will never call anyone and ask for their bank account number or to meet in an odd location to pay bail or fines with cash,” said Sheriff Kemler.Unfortunately, it is difficult to crack down on telephone scammers because calls are often generated from phone banks located out of state. While the calls remain under investigation, the best advice is to exercise common sense. If a resident suspects a particular telephone call may be a scam, do not give out any personal information and simply hang up. Anyone who receives such a call and is uncertain of its validity should report the call to the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office at 609-989-6111.

COVID-19 Vaccination Sites Planned At CURE Arena And MCCC

January 16, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County plans on opening an COVID-19 vaccination site at CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton in partnership with Capital Health System. An additional vaccination site is planned at Mercer County Community College and will be managed by the County Health Officer’s Association. See full press rease below from Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes:

Dear Mercer County Community,

The State of New Jersey this week ramped up its COVID-19 vaccination efforts, and Mercer County is preparing to do the same. The County will open a vaccination site at CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton in partnership with Capital Health System, which will manage the site. The opening date is dependent on vaccine supply but a soft opening is planned next week.

We had a successful partnership with Capital Health during the COVID-19 testing program we established last spring, and I can’t think of a more fitting partner for this next phase of the pandemic response – the vaccination phase. Like other vaccination locations, this site will be for those eligible under the state’s phasing plan that is designed to ensure that those most at risk are prioritized.

Mercer County also is working on opening a vaccination site  at Mercer County Community College that would be managed by the County Health Officers Association and utilize all of the resources and staffing available from the municipal and county health offices. The arena and MCCC vaccination locations will supplement, not replace, smaller sites including those currently being operated by municipal health departments and other health care facilities in Mercer County. If you have questions about the CURE Insurance Arena or MCCC vaccination sites, please email publichealth@mercercounty.org.

As of this morning, at least 7,342 vaccine doses had been administered in Mercer County, according to the state Department of Health. While we all want to see that number grow exponentially, we are simply not getting enough vaccine from the federal government, and we are using every single dose we receive. 

I ask that everyone be patient throughout what will be a months-long vaccination process and continue to take basic preventive measures to reduce the spread of the virus, which is still rampant in our community and seemingly everywhere else. Wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth; keep a least 6 feet away from other people; practice good hand hygiene; avoid large gatherings; and stay home if you are sick.

Anyone can – and everyone should – pre-register to receive a vaccination by visiting the state’s online portal at https://covidvaccine.nj.gov. The state expects to have a consumer call center up and running soon to assist people without Internet access in scheduling appointments, and to help answer general inquiries and questions. Those who have pre-registered will be notified when they are eligible to make a vaccination appointment. The state is compiling a list of designated vaccination locations for eligible recipients. That list will continue to grow.

For more information on who is eligible, and how to get vaccinated if you are eligible, please visit the state’s COVID-19 Vaccine website.

In addition to vaccinations, Mercer County continues to respond to the pandemic through testing, contact tracing and support. The County, in partnership with Vault Health Services, is offering a free COVID-19 saliva test on the next two Tuesdays – Jan. 19 and 26 – at the CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton. For details, please visit the COVID-19 Testing page on the County website, where you’ll also find information on the County’s at-home testing program.

These are trying times but we will get through them. Let’s continue to support each other and keep each other safe. Let’s continue to work together.

Brian M. Hughes

Mercer County Executive



BREAKING: Inmate Suffers Chemical Burns At Mercer County Correctional Center

January 14, 20221

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Around 1:00 pm, Hopewell EMS and Hopewell Fire Departments were detailed to the Mercer County Correctional Center at 1750 River Road for a victim with chemical burns to the face. A New Jersey State Police helicopter was requested to fly an inmate with chemical burns to a trauma center. NJSP North Star helicopter responded and picked up the patient for transpor.

A Mercer County spokes person told MidJersey.News this afternoon that they could confirm an incident took place a short while ago involving an inmate scalded from an unknown substance. The victim suffered burns and is being airlifted to a hospital. The matter is under investigation.

This is a breaking news story check back for further details when released.

Mercer County Health Officer Association Distribution Of Moderna Vaccine To Health Care Workers

The first Mercer County COVID-19 vaccine clinic was held in Hamilton today at Station 17

December 28, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Hamilton Township in collaboration with the Mercer County Health Officer Association (MCHOA) held the first COVID-19 vaccine clinic earlier today to Phase 1A healthcare workers.

In order to maximize COVID vaccination efforts, the Mercer County Health Officers Association has joined together to serve all communities within Mercer County throughout the four phases of the COVID-19 vaccination distribution. Under CDC and State health guidelines, the Moderna doses will first be distributed to healthcare workers who qualify under Phase 1A and who have not been vaccinated for COVID-19 through their employer or the federal Pharmacy Partnership for Long Term Care (LTC) Program administered through CVS and Walgreens.

This MCHOA is currently planning a series of COVID-19 vaccination clinics to support ongoing efforts to vaccinate healthcare workers which include emergency medical services. The MCHOA will administer the Moderna COVID-19 vaccinations at clinics throughout Mercer County municipalities point of dispensing (POD) locations.  The clinics will be held twice a week on a rotating schedule and have the capacity to handle 500 vaccines per week.. The COVID-19 vaccine clinics will be by appointment only and subject to the availability of vaccine doses on hand or accessible within the supply chain.

“Hamilton Township is proud to partner with the Mercer County Health Officer Association in order to ensure that those on the frontlines in our fight against this virus receive the vaccine as quickly as possible,” said Mayor Jeff Martin. “The arrival of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is a continued step forward to provide protection to more of our community’s critical healthcare workforce and eventually the general adult population.”

“Vaccination is a critical component to protecting our residents,” stated Hamilton Township Health Officer Christopher Hellwig. “Working together to safeguard the citizens of Mercer County is exactly what the founding members of the MCHOA had in mind when they formed in 1972. Our vaccination clinics will continue that ideal and work to protect the public’s health particularly those that have been most impacted by COVID-19, while giving us a clear end to this pandemic.”

Local Health Departments are one piece of the puzzle to vaccinate the State goal of 70% of the adult population in 6 months. This collective effort will ensure that our residents are provided with the opportunity to receive their vaccination in a timely manner and in a safe medical setting.  COVID-19 vaccines will continue to be rolled out in phases determined by the State. The Mercer County Health Officers Association collaboration will continue to work closely with federal, state, and local partners.

After No Vote On Efforts To Replace Lead Service Lines Mayor Releases Statement

Mayor says, “Blocking this ordinance is nothing less than gross malfeasance.”

December 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora released a statement on three city council members voting no blocking the Lead Service Line Replacement Program. Full statement below:


Other stories on Trenton Water Works:

TWW to Seek City Council Approval for State Funding to Remove More Lead Services From Its Water System

NJDEP Requests NJ Attorney General To File Legal Action Against Trenton For Failure To Comply With Safe Drinking Water Act

Attorney General, DEP File Lawsuit Asking Court to Address Violations at Trenton Water Works that Pose Risks to Public Health

Trenton Water Works Issues 2020 Water Quality Report

Trenton Water Saga Continues: Statement From Mayor Gusciora



Last night, Council President McBride, Councilwoman Vaughn, and Councilman Rodriguez blocked the efforts of Trenton Water Works (TWW) to replace lead service lines throughout our regional service area. TWW has made great strides in its initial phases of lead service line replacement and this $15 million bond ordinance was needed for the third phase scheduled to start later this year. In addition, the third phase would have triggered a program from the N.J. Infrastructure Bank that would have given 50 percent forgiveness on the bonds. The ordinance fell one vote shy of the five needed to pass, which will effectively freeze the service line program for the near future.

The council members who voted against the ordinance have effectively told their constituents as well as customers in other service municipalities that they do not care if lead is removed from their water. The fact remains, TWW is under a Consent Order with the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). Trenton faces a lawsuit by NJDEP as well as other service municipalities that TWW is not working fast enough to adhere to environmental standards as well as service line replacement. The three council members who voted against the ordinance have made that worse.

The lack of foresight is staggering. Council’s failure to approve this ordinance jeopardizes our plans to remove all lead services from the TWW system within the next six years. The well-established threat of lead in drinking water did not move the council members who voted against this proposal. Neither did the fact that half of $15 million proposal would have been forgiven under a state grant, which is a tremendous benefit for our city’s strained budget.

So long as homeowners have galvanized lead service lines running to their homes, they could be affected by lead-tainted water. It was time for City Council to take the appropriate action to protect its constituents and TWW service area consumers from these environmental hazards. Blocking this ordinance is nothing less than gross malfeasance.

Council members voting in the affirmative for the bonds were City Council Vice President Marge Caldwell-Wilson and Councilmen Jerell Blakely, Joe Harrison and George Muschal. –Statement from Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora


TWW to Seek City Council Approval for State Funding to Remove More Lead Services From Its Water System

December 21, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Water Works, the city-owned public water system that serves nearly a quarter-million consumers in five municipalities in Mercer County, will seek City Council approval on December 22 to accept $15 million in funding from the New Jersey Infrastructure Bank (I-Bank). The funding will be used for Phase 3 of its six-year Lead Service Line Replacement Program (LSLRP), Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora announced today.

If approved, Phase 3 of the LSLRP will remove 1,850 more lead services (short for lead service lines) from TWW’s 683-mile water distribution system and private homes in its service area, except for Hopewell Township, which has newer infrastructure. Fifty percent of the funding, $7.5 million, is a grant from I-Bank, an independent state financing authority that issues revenue bonds to make loans to finance the construction of eligible environmental and transportation infrastructure projects.

In the $25 million Phase 1 of the LSLRP, TWW personnel and two vendors operating under publicly awarded contracts with TWW—South State, Inc. and Spiniello Companies—have removed 2,620 lead services in Hamilton Township and Trenton. Phase 1 is on track to remove a total of 3,850 lead services by April 2021. 

The $25 million Phase 2, which begins in April 2021, will remove 3,500 lead services by March 2022.

Phase 3 starts in June 2021, with plans to remove 1,850 lead services by May 2022. Also, TWW will utilize personnel from its construction and maintenance operations to remove 900 lead services, bringing the combined total number of lead services removed from TWW’s water-distribution system to 10,000. The LSLRP is a critical capital project that is a part of TWW’s six-year, $405-million capital plan announced in 2020.

“When I took office in July 2018, I pledged to apply the leadership and resources necessary to modernize Trenton Water Works, which has nearly 63,000 customers, and to prioritize this policy goal,” said Mayor Gusciora. “TWW has made substantial progress in regulatory and administrative consent order compliance, developing and executing a $405-million capital plan, implementing corrosion control, removing lead services in the TWW system and at private homes, improving customer service, and strengthening its workforce. Much work remains, particularly addressing lead, and we are determined to remove all lead services from the TWW system within five-to-six years.”

Mayor Gusciora added: “I am asking Trenton city residents to phone your councilperson to request support for this additional round of funding for the Lead Service Line Replacement Program. The removal of lead pipes from the TWW system is contingent on available funding and a nexus of cooperation from state and local leaders, including our City Council. The removal of lead infrastructure from our water system is integral to maintaining high water quality and public health and wellness for many years to come.”

According to TWW’s inventory, there are 17,463 lead services in Trenton, 11,618 in Hamilton Township, 5,236 in Ewing Township, and 2,383 in Lawrence Township. Hopewell Township has no lead services because its infrastructure is newer. TWW regularly revises its overall inventory as it assesses pipe materials at private homes, using internal survey teams, LSLRP contractors, and information from homeowners. Service-line pipe material made of galvanized steel is considered a lead service.

Homeowners who have verified that their pipe material is galvanized steel can still sign up for a future phase of the LSLRP at twwleadprogram.com. Residents can also refer their questions about the program to a hotline – (609) 989-3600 – and will receive a return call from a TWW community-relations team member within 24 hours.

Purchased by the City of Trenton in 1859, Trenton Water Works (TWW) is one of the oldest and largest publicly owned water systems in the United States, supplying 28 million gallons of water per day to approximately a quarter-million consumers in a five-municipality service area in Mercer County, NJ: Trenton, parts of Hamilton Township, Ewing Township, Lawrence Township, and Hopewell Township. TWW operates a 60-million-gallon water-filtration plant and water-distribution system that includes a 100-million-gallon reservoir, 683 miles of water mains, three pump stations, nearly 8,000 valves, 3,517 fire hydrants, and six interconnections between TWW and other water suppliers. TWW has approximately 63,000 metered customers.

Christmas Parade, Hospital Appreciation At UPenn Princeton Medical Center

December 18, 2020

Team coverage by: Dennis Symons, Tyler Eckel, and Brian McCarthy

PLAINSBORO, NJ (MIDDLESEX)–Firefighters, EMS, and police with over 50 pieces of apparatus took part in a hospital worker appreciation event tonight at UPenn Princeton Medical Center. Hosted by Plainsboro Fire Department and Police, many agencies came through to show their support for hospital workers.

Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus, and even the Grinch showed up to show their support riding in the fire department’s ladder towers and were able to see hospital employees though the windows of the hospital.

This is a partial list of those participated:

Plainsboro Fire, Plainsboro EMS, Plainsboro Police Department, West Windsor Police Department, Princeton University Pubic Safety, Kingston Fire Company, Monmouth Junction Fire Comapny, Kendal Park Fire Comapny, Hightstown Fire Department, Little Rocky Hill Fire Company, Griggstown Fire Company, Middlesex County Hazmat, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Fire Department, South River Fire Department, Monroe Fire Company – 51, Lawrenceville Fire Company -23, North Brunswick Fire Company #1, North Brunswick Fire Comnpany #2, North Brunswick Fire Company #3, New Jersey State Forest Fire Service, NJSP Aviation Unit, East Windsor Rescue Squad, Princeton Rescue Squad, Mercer County Fire Coordinator, Hopewell Fire Department – 52





Above photos by: Tyler Eckel




Police Union’s “No Shave November” Raises $9,660 For Robbinsville Child With Cancer

December 3, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–The members of the Robbinsville Township Police Department PBA #344 have been running a “No Shave November” for years. Officers normally are clean shaven, but during the month of November, they are allowed to grow a beard with a donation to a fund that raises money for a good cause. This year, they were joined with the East Windsor Township Police PBA #192, Hopewell Police PBA #342, and Cranbury Police PBA #405, to raise money for Tyler Odman who has a rare stage 4 cancer called Hepatoblastoma.

The collective efforts of the four Police Benevolent Associations of Robbinsville, East Windsor, Hopewell and Cranbury raised $9,660 so far. Tonight, a check was presented to the family at the Robbinsville Township Police Station.


Related MidJersey.News stories here:

No Shave November To Benefit “Tyler’s Tribe”

Police And Firefighters Have Siren Parade To Support Child With Stage 4 Cancer






A “siren parade” was held for Tyler on September 25, 2020 where police, fire and EMS departments from Mercer County and Middlesex County showed their support.



As some of you may already know, Heather and Jason’s world has been shifted and forever changed by the recent cancer diagnosis for their son Tyler. Doctors  recently found a tumor on Tyler’s liver called Hepatoblastoma.

In early July, Tyler was having fevers and not feeling well. After 3 weeks of him not feeling well, his parents decided to take him to the hospital for additional testing. In the hospital, the doctors ordered an ultrasound for his abdomen. It was there that they learned Tyler had a mass on his liver.

That night Tyler was transferred to CHOP. Tyler quickly had blood work, MRI and CT scans, a PET scan, and a biopsy of his liver. On August 17, 2020 it was confirmed that Tyler’s tumor was Hepatoblastoma. He started chemotherapy soon after his diagnosis.

Fortunately, the scans have shown that the cancer is isolated to Tyler’s liver. Tyler has one very large mass, and several other masses all over his liver, which classifies his cancer as stage IV. Chemotherapy will be the beginning of Tyler’s journey. He will require a future surgery, followed by more chemotherapy. 

Tyler has been a rockstar at every single doctors appointment and chemotherapy treatment. He loves to help the doctors and nurses. When he is home from treatment, he enjoys playing outside with his twin brother Chase, eating Chinese food, and chips. 

Heather and Jason have a long road ahead to ensure that Tyler receives the best treatment. He has a busy schedule between blood work appointments, physical therapy, chemotherapy, and various hospital stays. Heather has already taken a leave of absence from work in order to care for Tyler and support his treatment. 

Tyler is a strong little boy, and Heather and Jay are the best parents he could possibly have, who will fight alongside him. That being said, they can’t do this alone! So many people have asked how they can help, right now –  this is it. The donations will help with covering insurance costs, medical bills, physical therapy copays, prescription costs, meals at the hospital, gas, tolls, and coffee for mom and dad.  Any donation will help take some of the burden that comes along with extensive medical treatment, so they can focus on Tyler and Chase.

Although this type of cancer is rare, it is treatable and curable. Tyler has a wonderful team of doctors at CHOP. Tyler has a long road ahead of him, but his positive attitude keeps everyone going each day.  Tyler is our super hero!!!

Please keep Tyler in your prayers. All the continued support you can offer will be forever appreciated by the Odman Family.

Love,
Heather, Jason, Tyler, and Chase


Firefighters Rescue Several People From Vehicles Stuck In Flood Waters Around Mercer County

November 30, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Tornado watches, severe thunder storm warnings and flash flood and flood warnings were all issued by the National Weather Service this afternoon though this evening.

Several drivers around Mercer County decided to drive though floodwaters needed to be rescued from their vehicles when their vehicles became disabled and stuck in the floods.

Route 29 North Bound prior to Calhoun Street a vehicle drove though flood waters and became disabled. The Trenton Fire Department responded to the South Bound lanes and were able to remove the driver from the stalled vehicle.

In Lawrence Township a person was removed from their vehicle at Princeton Pike and Devon Avenue and another location.

Firefighters were sent to several locations in Hopewell Township to remove occupants of stalled vehicles.

Here is a public service message from the National Weather Service, “Turn Around, Don’t Drown”




Around 1,600 Pounds Of Frozen Turkey Distributed This Afternoon At Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church

November 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–The Willing Workers of Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church and members of Mercer County’s PBAs (Police Benevolent Associations) distributed frozen turkeys and food baskets late this afternoon at the church on North Clinton Avenue.

There were at least thirty boxes of frozen turkeys distributed with an average weight of around 55 pounds per box for a total of about 1,600 pounds. There were numerous baskets of food and turkey baking supplies provided to go along with the frozen birds.

There were several locations today for turkey distribution see this morning’s MidJersey.News story here: Mercer County PBA Assists With Turkey Distribution



Mercer County PBA Assists With Turkey Distribution

November 23, 2020

By: Tyler Eckel

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–All chapters of the Mercer County PBA are assisting with turkey distribution in Mercer County today. This morning at Saint Phillips Baptist Church, members unloaded over 600 pounds of turkey for distribution at that location.

There were two other locations with many more pounds donated this morning including the Hamilton YMCA.

The distribution will continue this evening at the Willing Workers of Jerusalem Baptist Church in Trenton at 4:00 pm.



Mercer County Offering Free COVID-19 Testing November 24 & December 1 at Cure Arena

Mercer County is also proud to offer free at-home COVID-19 testing. These tests are available to all residents of Mercer County, free of charge.

November 18, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes today announced that the County, in partnership with Vault Health Services, will offer free COVID-19 testing on Tuesday, Nov. 24, and Tuesday, Dec. 1, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the CURE Insurance Arena, 81 Hamilton Ave. The saliva test is available to County residents 14 years or older and anyone employed as a first responder or health care worker in Mercer County.

Those going to the arena for testing should use Parking Lot 2 off South Broad Street to access Gate A. Testing will be conducted in the arena concourse. Bring identification showing Mercer County residency and a smartphone or tablet if you have one. No prescription is necessary. Please avoid eating, drinking, chewing gum or smoking 30 minutes prior to taking the test.

Testing will be limited to 300 people on each of the two days but additional pop-up testing sites will be scheduled around the County in the near future.

If you want to avoid the lines, Mercer County also offers an at-home saliva test for COVID-19, which can be requested by visiting www.mercercares.org. If you need help with the online registration process, assistance will be available Tuesday at the arena. 



Covid-19 Test at Home Program

Mercer County is proud to offer free at-home COVID-19 testing. These tests are available to all residents of Mercer County, free of charge.

The saliva collection test for COVID-19 has the same effectiveness as the nasal swab test. This test is performed under the supervision of our healthcare provider, Vault, through a video telehealth visit eliminating the risk of person-to-person exposure to the virus.

To register for your at-home testing kit, you must first fill out the form below to verify your Mercer County residency. Within 24-48 hours following your submission, you will receive a link to order your free kit on the Vault Health website. This is FREE to all Mercer County residents, and health insurance is not required but a claim will be submitted if are covered.

Please note the following:

  1. There is no out of pocket cost for this test.
  2. You must be a resident of Mercer County or employed as a first responder or health care worker in Mercer County.
  3. Only persons over the age of 14 are eligible for this test. Persons under the age of 18 should have a parent or guardian complete the registration for them.
  4. You will receive your code within 48 hours.
  5. This is not an antibody test. This test is designed to determine if you currently are infected with COVID-19 and have the potential to infect others.

If your test is positive, or if you have symptoms, call your health care professional.

Mayors And Local Government Officials Warn New COVID-19 Cases On Rise And To Take Precautions

November 14, 2020

MERCER COUNTY, NJ–Mayors and local officials warn of increased COVID-19 transmission as cases rise in Mercer County. Officials are reminding residents to continue to take precautions by limiting gatherings, wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and other general COVID-19 precautions.

In the City of Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora has announced new restrictions as COVID-19 transmission rates have doubled in each of the last three weeks.

Trenton’s transmission rate is currently 44.2 cases per 100,000 people, which exceeds both the state and county rates at 29.3 and 28.9, respectively. Trenton has had a total of 4,598 COVID-19 cases with 80 related deaths.

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes stated, Mercer County surpassed 10,000 cumulative positive test results since the start of the pandemic, and the United States surpassed a staggering 10 million positive cases. In addition, the New Jersey Department of Health has reported more than 13,000 positive cases statewide since Monday.

It was anticipated that colder weather in the fall and winter would drive people indoors and trigger a second wave of virus transmissions. We’re only in mid-November and the second wave is here. New cases of COVID-19 are on the rise and everyone needs to take that seriously, County Executive Hughes stated.

Robbinsville Township Mayor Dave Fried said in a Facebook post, “I always like to start with good news, but a second wave of COVID-19 is upon us and it is making that increasingly difficult. I am going to give this to you straight. Since October 30, Robbinsville Township reports 29 new cases that is by far the highest number of new cases we have encountered since this started.”

Mayor Fried also stated in a message that My personal feeling is this second wave will get worse before it gets better, so I am asking people to be increasingly diligent.

Hamilton Township Mayor Jeff Martin shared the weekly update from Hamilton Township that includes a weekly COVID-19 update and that urges the following precautions:

•Keep Your Distance — stay at least six feet away from others — and Wear a Face Covering.

•Wash Your Hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after being in a public place, as well as after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

.•If soap and water are not accessible, Use a Hand Sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

•Avoid Touching Your Eyes, Nose and Mouth with unwashed hands.•Avoid Close Contact with people who are sick.

•Stay Home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.

•Cover Your Mouth and Nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.


Full text of statements below:


TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mayor W. Reed Gusciora yesterday announced new restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of COVID-19 as transmission rates in Trenton have doubled each of the last three weeks.

Mayor Gusciora’s amended State of Emergency declaration now includes the following instructions, which will remain in effect from Nov. 16, 2020 through Dec. 5, 2020:

  • All Trenton businesses, including restaurants, bars and grocery stores must close at 10:00 p.m. daily. Gas stations may stay open only to dispense gas.
  • Restaurants and drive-through businesses may be open for pickup or delivery until 11:00 p.m., provided that no parties are allowed to congregate inside or outside of the establishment.
  • All city residents are encouraged to remain indoors after 10:00 p.m.
  • All city residents should wear masks and practice social distancing techniques as recommended by the CDC by avoiding large crowds, and, whenever possible, keeping a distance of six feet from other people.
  • All city residents are strongly encouraged not to have large family gatherings on Thanksgiving and to avoid hosting visitors from states that are on the Governor’s travel advisory list.

Trenton’s transmission rate is currently 44.2 cases per 100,000 people, which exceeds both the state and county rates at 29.3 and 28.9, respectively. Trenton has had a total of 4,598 COVID-19 cases with 80 related deaths.

“It’s clear the second wave is here and has hit the Capital City especially hard,” said Mayor Gusciora. “Our transmission rates may even be higher now than they were in the spring. While we believe these new restrictions will help, we won’t get past this crisis unless our residents wear their masks and practice social distancing. No more excuses about COVID-19 fatigue: the virus never gets tired, and neither should our residents and businesses when it comes to keeping this city safe.”

“It is critically important that when we see cases rise throughout our city, county and state that we are extremely cautious and we social distance, wear masks and limit indoor gatherings as much as possible,” said Dr. Kemi Alli, Chief Executive Officer of the Henry J. Austin Health Center. “If not, our path will follow sister states such as North and South Dakota, and Montana which are currently in dire straits.”

While transmission rates have risen across all age groups, a quarter of all hospitalizations over the past month are comprised of individuals age 30 and below. The greatest source of transmission has been indoor contact, and residents are advised to wear masks even around friends or relatives who are visiting.


Mercer County, NJ:

A letter from County Executive Brian M. Hughes

Mercer County and the nation both reached sobering COVID-19 milestones this week: Mercer County surpassed 10,000 cumulative positive test results since the start of the pandemic, and the United States surpassed a staggering 10 million positive cases. In addition, the New Jersey Department of Health has reported more than 13,000 positive cases statewide since Monday. It was anticipated that colder weather in the fall and winter would drive people indoors and trigger a second wave of virus transmissions. We’re only in mid-November and the second wave is here. New cases of COVID-19 are on the rise and everyone needs to take that seriously.

When you’re around people outside your own household, wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth and practice social distancing. Wash your hands frequently and use hand sanitizer. Avoid crowds and stay home if you are sick. Public health officials are advising that the safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is to keep your gathering small with just immediate family. Please bear that in mind when planning for the holiday. We know what we need to do to reduce the spread of the virus – now it’s up to us. Let’s continue to support each other and keep each other safe. Let’s continue to work together.

One of the many impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic has been job loss. State officials reported this week that more than 1.7 million New Jersey workers have filed an unemployment claim since March, with about 1.46 million workers meeting the monetary requirements to receive benefits. Jobseekers need all the help they can get, and with that in mind I’d like to call attention to the work being done by the staff at the Mercer County One-Stop Career Center.

As part of Mercer County’s ongoing effort to connect jobseekers with employers, and do it safely during the public health crisis, our One-Stop recently held a drive-through job fair at the CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton that had the participation of 45 employers and was attended by about 525 individuals. Attendees were required to wear face masks but did not have to leave their vehicles. When they pulled up, they were handed a bag filled with information provided by employers on the jobs they had available, along with information about One-Stop services and community resources. This was a successful effort to help people in our community find work.

The inventive job fair came on the heels of the One-Stop’s equally successful Summer Youth Jobs Connection program. After receiving grant funding from the state in early June, One-Stop Director Virgen Velez and her staff set about making the summer job program a reality, despite a small time window and challenges presented by the pandemic. The program, which served Mercer County residents between the ages of 16 and 24, provided a paid six-week work experience and paid virtual job readiness workshops, along with transportation assistance.

I join the One-Stop and the County’s Workforce Development Board in thanking the employers who brought interns into their facilities this summer. The young adults learned not only traditional work skills but the virtual communication skills that have become essential in the COVID-19 work and school environment. And I applaud the One-Stop team, whose passionate commitment enabled it to deliver a summer employment program and job fair amid a pandemic.

Brian M. Hughes
Mercer County Executive


Robbinsville, NJ:

Mayor Dave Fried:

I always like to start with good news, but a second wave of COVID-19 is upon us and it is making that increasingly difficult. I am going to give this to you straight. Since October 30, Robbinsville Township reports 29 new cases that is by far the highest number of new cases we have encountered since this started.

Thankfully, we have not seen significant spread or sickness in our three schools. We are seeing an uptick in cases throughout Mercer County, including increased positives reported by our first responders and front line workers resulting in staffing shortages. We have seen an uptick in hospitalizations across Mercer County.

My personal feeling is this second wave will get worse before it gets better, so I am asking people to be increasingly diligent. We have kids coming home from college for Thanksgiving, and while I am not going to tell you how to host or visit your families, I am asking you to be smart.

There are some things you can do to minimize the spread, such as not sharing glassware or silverware. Try to be more aware when eating in groups. Wash your hands regularly and wear a mask when you can. While many of our cases have been asymptotic, our fear as flu season approaches is we may see people with multiple symptoms for both COVID-19 and the flu, or family members suffering from both in the same household. We are on stand-by to help and volunteer when and where we are needed. We hope you will join us as that need increases.

Additionally, our kids still need to socialize in the face of the virus. That said our Recreation Department, in conjunction with the school district, will be coming up with programs to help keep our children safely engaged. This is a difficult and complex decision … and it will not be for everyone. There will be no right or wrong. It really comes down to what is best for your family, while not judging others.

I am very proud of our community for all it has done to flatten this curve. You all have been rock stars, and it is a pleasure to be Mayor of this incredible town. Keep your chins up. Pfizer has announced they have a vaccine and early reports indicate it is 90 percent effective, so help should be on the way.

We will get through this together. Thank you all for all you do, and God bless you all. —Robbinsville Mayor Dave Fried


Mercer County Firemen’s Association 2020 Memorial Service

November 5, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–The Mercer County Firemen’s Association 2020 Memorial Service that was originally scheduled for May 6, 2020 was postponed several times due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. This year’s Memorial Service was held at Colonial Fire Company Hamilton Township Station 18 and was hosted by Union Fire Company Hopewell Township Station 53. Hamilton Township Station 18 has a large hall and is big enough to hold the service while complying with COVID-19 guidelines.

The annual Memorial Service is held to honor members of Mercer County Firemen’s Ladies Auxiliary and Firefighters in Mercer County. All fire departments in Mercer County are represented and Hope Fire Company of Allentown, Monmouth County is also a member.

This year’s Memorial Roll was read honored 14 Ladies Auxiliary members and 36 firefighters. As each name is read a white carnation is placed in a Maltese cross and firefighters salute and family members stand as the name of their loved one is read.


2020 Mercer County Firemen’s Association Memorial Service. Video by Dick Cunningham, Broadcast Productions-East Windsor Station 46


Mercer County: General Election Vote By Mail Secured Drop Box Locations

All Drop Boxes will be open by October 5, 2020 until General Election Night of November 3, 2020 at 8:00 pm.

October 4, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–Recently a secured election ballot drop box has been installed at the Robbinsville Township Municipal Building. The box is to the left of the rear parking lot entrance to the building. Just look for the flag pole and the box is in that location. There are also signs located in the parking lot to show the way to the secure drop box.


Robbinsville Township Municipal Clerk Michele Seigfried explains the 2020 General Election process on November 3 in the wake of COVID-19 in this informative video.


For the most up to date information on the 2020 elections and drop box locations visit the Mercer County Board of Elections website here and here: Mercer County Board Of Elections

All Active Registered Voters will receive a Mail-In-Ballot that can be placed in a drop box at any one of the fifteen (15) locations (see below), mailed, or hand delivered at the polling location on November 3 from 5:15 am-8:00 pm.

Drop boxes will be open beginning in October 2020 until General Election Night of November 3, 2020 at 8:00 pm.



Secured Drop Box Locations

Please Note: We anticipate more drop boxes, however, at this time do not know how many and in what locations they will be placed. Any and all changes will be updated on the website.

** All Drop Boxes will be open by October 5, 2020

EAST WINDSOR:

  • East Windsor Police Station – 80 One Mile Road, East Windsor, NJ, 08520 (Courthouse)

EWING:

  • Ewing Municipal Building – 2 Jake Garzio Drive, Ewing, NJ, 08628 (In Front)

HAMILTON:

  • Hamilton Golf/Call Center – 5 Justice Samuel A. Alito Way, Hamilton, NJ, 08619
  • Hamilton Municipal Building – 2090 Greenwood Avenue, Hamilton, NJ, 08609 (Right side of Bldg.)
  • Nottingham Firehouse – 200 Mercer Street, Hamilton Square, NJ, 08690 (Right side of Bldg.)

HIGHTSTOWN:

  • Hightstown Firehouse #1 – 140 N. Main Street, Hightstown, NJ, 08520 (Front of Bldg.)

HOPEWELL TWP:

  • Hopewell Township Administration Building – 201 Washington Crossing-Pennington Rd, Titusville, NJ 08560 (at the intersection of Scotch Road)

LAWRENCE:

  • Lawrence Municipal Building – 2207 Lawrenceville Rd, (Rt 206) Lawrence, NJ 08648 (North Side-Right Side of the Municipal Bldg.)

PRINCETON:

  • Princeton Municipal Building – 400 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ, 08540(Front of Bldg. facing  Witherspoon)

ROBBINSVILLE:

  • Robbinsville Municipal Building, 2298 NJ-33, Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (In back parking lot of Municipal Bldg.)

TRENTON:

  • County Clerk’s Office- Courthouse Annex- 209 S. Broad Street, Trenton, NJ, 08608 (in front)
  • Trenton City Hall – 319 E. State Street, Trenton, NJ, 08608 (In back/ near Municipal Clerks Office)
  • Henry J. Austin Center – 321 N. Warren St, Trenton, NJ, 08618(Corner of Tucker)
  • Trenton Central High School – 400 Chambers Street, Trenton, NJ, 08609(across from McDonald’s)

WEST WINDSOR:

  • West Windsor Municipal Complex, 271 Clarksville Rd, West Windsor, NJ,08550 (Between the Municipal building and the Senior Center)

Home Energy Assistance Available To Eligible Mercer County Residents, LIHEAP Application Period Opens Today

October 1, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes is reminding residents that assistance is available for energy costs for those who qualify beginning Oct. 1, but that applicants must adhere to certain COVID-19 restrictions. The County’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), offered in coordination with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, is designed to help low-income families and individuals meet home heating and medically necessary cooling costs.This year, the LIHEAP application period is Oct. 1, 2020, to July 31, 2021. Mercer County will continue accepting applications for the Universal Service Fund (USF) Program throughout the year. Residents who pay their own heating costs, and meet the income guidelines, may be eligible to receive financial assistance with their winter heating bill. Residents with medical conditions also may be eligible to receive cooling assistance. An eligibility chart can be found on the Mercer County website.

“The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have created financial hardships for many households that now have to worry about the cost of heating and other energy bills,” Mr. Hughes said. “I urge our low-income residents to visit our website or contact the County housing office to determine their eligibility to apply for energy assistance.”

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the public may visit the Mercer County Office of Housing and Community Development, located at 640 South Broad St., Trenton, by appointment only. If an in-person visit is necessary, clients can call 609-337-0933 or email heatingappt@mercercounty.org to schedule an appointment.

Beginning Oct. 1, the County will temporarily begin operating an outdoor informational center adjacent to the 640 South Broad St. building. Clients will be able to drop off applications and access information from LIHEAP staff. 

The County will continue to accept applications by regular mail, fax and email until July 31, 2021. Applications, forms and information are available on the Mercer County website.

Troopers Help Plant Trees to Improve Quality of Water at Rosedale Park

September 28, 2020

PENNINGTON, NJ (MERCER)–On Friday, September 25, members of the Public Information Bureau volunteered their time to help the Mercer County Park Commission plant trees at Rosedale Park in Pennington, N.J.The troopers worked with several other volunteers to help wrap up the week-long project to plant trees and shrubs along the Rosedale Park Lake. Throughout the week, volunteers helped plant approximately 1,200 trees and shrubs, which will help improve water quality in the Stony Brook, feed pollinators, and improve foraging resources for birds. The troopers were glad to assist the Mercer County Park Commission in this outstanding initiative.

2020 Police Unity Tour Bike Ride Held In NJ


See related MidJersey.News coverage here: Police Unity Tour Memorial Service And Blessing Of Riders


September 27, 2020

Check back for more photos, still having photos sent into MidJersey.News and will be updated again tomorrow or later tonight.

STAFFORD TOWNSHIP, NJ (OCEAN)–The Police Unity Tour held a one day bike ride today starting in Asbury Park and proceeding on shore routes towards Stafford Township ending at the Stafford Township Police Memorial.

This year’s spring four day ride that is usually held in May was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic that ends at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. 

This year’s ride was shortened to one day and two hundred sixty police officers participated from fourteen states including California and Missouri.


History of the Police Unity Tour:

In 1997, Florham Park (NJ) Police Officer Patrick Montuore had a simple idea: organize a four-day bicycle ride from New Jersey to Washington, DC to raise public awareness about law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, and to ensure that their sacrifice is never forgotten. With that, the Police Unity Tour was formed. 

What started with 18 riders on a four day fund-raising bicycle ride from Florham Park, NJ to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. has grown into 9 chapters consisting of nearly 2,600 members nationwide who make the trip annually. Participants include riders, motorcycles, and support personnel.

The journey is long and challending but for the Police Unity Tour participants it is what they prepare for throughout the year. Through fundraising and physical training, they know that their efforts raise awareness of the ultimate sacrifice made by so many law enforcement officers. 

The last leg of the jouney ends at the Memorial, where the participants are greeted by friends, family, and survirors. Once there, many Police Unity Tour members present remembrance braclets worn on their wrists throughout the journey to the families of the fallen. 

May 2020, the Police Unity Tour was proud to donate more than $2.0 million to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, bringing our total donations to more than $30 million since their inception. 

The Police Unity Tour is the sponsor of the National Law Enforcement Museum’s Hall of Remembrance, the Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award, and Recently Fallen Alert programs. 








Video provided by: Bucky For Sherriff










Police Unity Tour Memorial Service And Blessing Of Riders

Police Unity Tour “We Ride For Those Who Died”


See related MidJersey.News coverage of the event here: 2020 Police Unity Tour Bike Ride Held In NJ


September 26, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–This evening the Hamilton Township Police Department hosted a memorial service and blessing of riders that are in tomorrow’s Police Unity Tour ride from Asbury Park to Stafford Twp., NJ.

The primary purpose of the Police Unity Tour is to raise awareness of Law Enforcement Officers who have died in the line of duty. The secondary purpose is to raise funds for the National Law Enforcement Officer’s Memorial.

Normally the ride would be held in May when several Chapters of the Police Unity Tour leave New Jersey on bicycles and ride to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. The over 250 mile journey on bicycles takes 4 days to complete riding at least 62 miles per day.

This year’s spring ride was canceled due to COVID-19 but the Police Unity Tour was able to schedule a one day ride on Sunday.

Some history on the Police Unity Tour:

In 1997, Florham Park (NJ) Police Officer Patrick Montuore had a simple idea: organize a four-day bicycle ride from New Jersey to Washington, DC to raise public awareness about law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, and to ensure that their sacrifice is never forgotten. With that, the Police Unity Tour was formed.

What started with 18 riders on a four day fund-raising bicycle ride from Florham Park, NJ to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. has grown into 9 chapters consisting of nearly 2,600 members nationwide who make the trip annually. Participants include riders, motorcycles, and support personnel.

The journey is long and challending but for the Police Unity Tour participants it is what they prepare for throughout the year. Through fundraising and physical training, they know that their efforts raise awareness of the ultimate sacrifice made by so many law enforcement officers.

The last leg of the jouney ends at the Memorial, where the participants are greeted by friends, family, and survirors. Once there, many Police Unity Tour members present remembrance braclets worn on their wrists throughout the journey to the families of the fallen.

May 2020, the Police Unity Tour was proud to donate more than $2.0 million to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, bringing our total donations to more than $30 million since their inception.

The Police Unity Tour is the sponsor of the National Law Enforcement Museum’s Hall of Remembrance, the Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award, and Recently Fallen Alert programs.




TWW Launches Two-Year Project to Paint Fire Hydrants, Color Coding Them to Indicate Flow Rate for Fire Suppression

September 22, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Water Works will be painting 3,501 fire hydrants in its five-municipality service area over the next 24 months, weather permitting.

“We are improving the quality of TWW’s fire hydrants for effective fire suppression,” said Michael Walker, Chief of Communications and Community Relations. “We’ve been inspecting fire hydrants for operability and flow rate over the last few months, and we now plan to vary their color to indicate how quickly water flows from them to fire personnel and emergency responders.”

TWW personnel will strip hydrants of old layers of paint, and then apply primer and two fresh coats. Color codes to indicate flow volume in gallons per minute are as follows: Light Blue: 1,500 gallons per minute; Green: 1,000-1,499 gallons per minute; Orange: 500-999 gallons per minute; Red: less than 500 gallons per minute. 

TWW personnel must have direct access to the hydrants. We are therefore asking residents to please remove any plantings or decorations that might be obscuring local hydrants. Hydrants should never be blocked, hidden, or decorated, as this interferes with emergency access.

“We ask that residents not paint or decorate fire hydrants, which prevents fire personnel from knowing a hydrant’s flow rate during an emergency,” added Walker.

If you have questions about TWW’s hydrant paint project, including reporting hydrants that have been knocked over or are not functioning properly, please call TWW’s Construction and Maintenance at (609) 989-3222.