Category: Pennington

Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash With Pedestrian Reported In Pennington

October 6, 2021

PENNINGTON BOROUGH, NJ (MERCER)–On October 6, 2021 at 10:08 a.m., the Pennington Borough Police Department was dispatched to the intersection of West Delaware Avenue and Route 31. Officers arrived on scene and found that a white single axle Penske Box truck had struck an elderly female.

The investigation revealed that the box truck which was being driven by a 32-year-old male from Phillipsburg, NJ was travelling North on Route 31 and that the Victim a 84-year-old female from Pennington, NJ was attempting to cross the road in the crosswalk located at the south side of the intersection on Route 31. The victim entered Route 31 and the front of the truck struck her. The victim was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Route 31 and West Delaware Avenue was closed from approximately 10:15 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.

The crash remains under investigation by Pennington Police Senior Officer Novin Thomas and Officer Johnathan Pauciullo and Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office Detective Sal Vaccaro.

Anyone who may have witnessed this crash is asked to contact Senior Officer Novin Thomas or Officer Johnathan Pauciullo at 609-737-2020.


Hughes Announces Opening Of FEMA/Mercer Disaster Recovery Center

Weekdays 7 a.m.-7 p.m.; weekends 8 a.m.-5 p.m., at Hollowbrook Center

September 14, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–

TRENTON – Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes announced that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Mercer County has opened a Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) at Hollowbrook Community Center, 320 Hollowbrook Drive, Ewing Township, to assist any Mercer County residents or businesses whose property was damaged in the remnants of Hurricane Ida. The DRC is open starting today, Sept. 14 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sunday. Residents do not need to schedule an appointment to visit the center, nor must they be Mercer County residents.

The DRC will be staffed by FEMA representatives who can provide information on FEMA disaster aid and answer questions. Again, the DRC is open to residents and businesses from every municipality in Mercer County, and residents from any other county that received the FEMA “Disaster” declaration.

On Sept. 10, Mercer County residents were declared eligible to register for Individual Assistance with FEMA. Residents who previously registered for assistance via the Internet or by phone do not need to visit the DRC, but can ask questions or seek further information in person at the DRC. The eligibility for FEMA Individual Assistance means residents or business owners whose properties were directly damaged by the flooding or storm events on September 1-3 can apply to recoup their losses.

What is a Disaster Recovery Center?

A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office where applicants may go for information about FEMA or other disaster assistance programs, or for questions related to a specific case.

Some of the services that a DRC may provide:

  • Guidance regarding disaster recovery
  • Clarification of any written correspondence received
  • Housing Assistance and Rental Resource information
  • Answers to questions, resolution to problems and referrals to agencies that may provide further assistance
  • Status of applications being processed by FEMA.
  • SBA program information if there is a SBA Representative at the Disaster Recovery Center site.

Affected residents and business owners can begin the disaster application process by registering online at DisasterAssistance.gov or registering by phone at 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired.

The toll-free numbers are available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time Monday through Sunday, and applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information such as their name, the name of the business, address, phone number, insurance coverage, and other information to help substantiate losses.

Individual Assistance, if awarded, can cover reimbursement for a variety of storm-related expenses.

These include, but are not limited to: rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are uninhabitable; grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance; low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance; loans for small businesses that suffered disaster-related cash flow problems; and loans for farmers and other agriculture operators to cover property loss.

Additionally, mall businesses and most private nonprofit organizations in Mercer County are eligible to apply for Economic Injury Disaster Loans from the Small Business Administration. For more information, visit https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ela/s/.

Residents in need of assistance with damage from Tropical Storm Ida may call a Home Cleanup Hotline at 844-965-1386 to be connected with volunteers from local relief organizations and community groups that may be able to assist with cutting fallen trees, removing drywall, flooring and appliances, tarping roofs and mitigating mold.

The hotline will remain open through Sept. 17


September 11 Events Throughout Mercer County

September 11, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County Executive, Brian M. Hughes said, It’s hard to believe it’s been two decades since the terrorist attacks that took the lives of nearly 3,000 people in New York City, at the Pentagon and in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. Tragically, we’ve lost many more since; heroic first responders and others who spent weeks and months working at Ground Zero, and who have since died from cancer or respiratory illness.

While 20 years may seem like a long time, we continue to mourn the loss of innocent life on that fateful day. In Mercer County, many residents lost loved ones and friends, and continue to bear the scars of having their lives changed forever by senseless violence. So, every year on this date, we honor the victims of September 11 by coming together in solemn remembrance, quiet reflection and in service.

But honoring their memory isn’t limited to a formal ceremony on or near the anniversary date.

The County’s September 11 Memorial – which opened in Mercer County Park in West Windsor on the 10th anniversary of 9/11 – was designed to be a special place where people can go for solace and comfort 365 days a year. I encourage everyone to visit that memorial when the time is right for you, to spend a few moments in quiet reflection and remembrance.

And most importantly, each and every day, we can honor the memory of the victims of September 11 by embracing peace and hope, and not losing sight of the principles on which America stands, such as tolerance, inclusion and caring. Each and every day, we can honor their memory by celebrating our oneness as a nation and our unity in the face of adversity.

September 11 Events Throughout Mercer County

8 a.m.,  New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs; 101 Eggerts Crossing Road, Lawrence Township.

8:30 a.m., Lawrence Township 9/11 Memorial Ceremony; Memorial Park, Pilla Avenue, Lawrence Township.

9:45 a.m., Robbinsville Professional Firefighters Association will conduct its 20th annual ceremony at the 9/11 memorial site on Lake Drive.

10 a.m., Hamilton Township September 11th 20th Anniversary Ceremony; Memorial Grove, Veterans Park, Klockner Road Entrance, Hamilton.

10 a.m.,  East Windsor Township 9/11 Program & Wreath Laying Ceremony, East Windsor Municipal Building, Lanning Blvd.

10:30 a.m., Ewing Township 9/11 20th Anniversary Ceremony, Ewing Township Municipal Complex, 2 Jake Garzio Drive, Ewing.

11 a.m., Hopewell Valley 9/11 Memorial Ceremony, Woolsey Park, presented by the Sept. 11th & Emergency Services Memorial Committee.

12 noon, Princeton’s 9/11 Memorial Dedication, 2 Mount Lucas Road, Princeton, in front of the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad. The 9/11 Committee will dedicate a permanent memorial containing an 8-foot piece of steel recovered from the World Trade Center.

7 p.m., West Windsor Township 9/11 “20th Anniversary” Ceremony; Twin Ponds Memorial at the Ronald R. Rogers Arboretum, intersection of Clarksville and Princeton-Hightstown Road.


FEMA Has Approved A Major Disaster Declaration For Mercer County

September 11, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes announced yesterday that FEMA has approved a Major Disaster Declaration in Mercer County, allowing individuals impacted by Tropical Storm Ida last week to register at www.disasterassistance.gov for direct assistance for Ida-related recovery.

Mr. Hughes urged those who were impacted by last week’s storm to register for assistance that may include home repairs, temporary housing, low-cost loans and other programs. FEMA advises individuals who have homeowners or renters insurance to file a claim as soon as possible. By law, FEMA cannot duplicate benefits for losses covered by insurance, but those who are uninsured or underinsured may be eligible for federal assistance.

“I greatly appreciate FEMA’s response to the situation here in Mercer County, where residents in some of our communities are in dire need of assistance,” Mr. Hughes said.  “And I thank the Biden Administration, Senators Booker and Menendez, Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, and Governor Phil Murphy, as well as our county Office of Emergency Management, for their help in getting Mercer much-needed federal aid and accelerating our recovery process. I also thank our residents for their patience and perseverance during this difficult time.”

The fastest and easiest way to apply for assistance is by visiting www.disasterassistance.gov or by downloading the FEMA App on the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store.

If it is not possible to apply online, call 800-621-3362 (TTY: 800-462-7585). The toll-free telephone lines operate from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. CDT, seven days a week. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their specific number assigned to that service.

When you apply for assistance, FEMA advises having the following information readily available:

• A current phone number where you can be contacted
• Your address at the time of the disaster and the address where you are now staying
• Your Social Security number
• A general list of damage and losses
• If insured, the policy number or the agent and/or the company name

U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) low-interest disaster loans are available for homeowners, renters, businesses of any size and most nonprofits. Similar to FEMA, SBA cannot duplicate benefits for losses covered by insurance.

• For small businesses, those engaged in aquaculture and most nonprofits, up to $2 million is available for working capital needs even if there was no property damage, with a $2 million maximum loan for any combination of property damage and working capital needs.
• For homeowners: up to $200,000 is available to repair or replace their primary residence. For homeowners and renters: up to $40,000 is available to replace personal property, including vehicles.

Businesses and residents canapply at https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ela/s/.For information and assistance completing an application, call 800-659-2955 or email DisasterCustomerService@sba.gov. SBA will answer specific questions about how a disaster loan may help each survivor recover from the disaster damage.

In addition, residents in need of assistance with damage from Tropical Storm Ida may call a Home Cleanup Hotline at 844-965-1386 to be connected with volunteers from local relief organizations and community groups that may be able to assist with cutting fallen trees, removing drywall, flooring and appliances, tarping roofs and mitigating mold. The hotline will remain open through Sept. 17.






Tropical Storm Ida Pounds Area, Tornados, Flash Floods, Rescues Made, Deaths Reported

Flash flooding from Tropical Storm Ida’s heavy rains flooded roadways and many homes as creeks and rivers overflowed. Many people were caught in their vehicles in the raging flood waters and 23 New Jerseyans have lost their life to this storm according to Governor Phil Murphy. The National Weather Service has confirmed 7 tornados, in NJ and PA so far.


Tropical Storm Ida Stories Here:

Tropical Storm Ida Floods Lawrence Township 100+ Displaced

2 Tropical Storm Ida Related Fatalities And 50 Rescues Made In Hopewell Township Floods

BREAKING: House Explodes In Manville, NJ

Tropical Storm Ida Pounds Area, Tornados, Flash Floods, Rescues Made, Deaths Reported

City of Trenton Continuing Evacuation Proceedings in High-Risk Flood Zones as Water Levels Rise Again

Trenton Evacuates “The Island” In Preparation Of Anticipated Flooding

BREAKING: “Miracle In Mercer County” As 3 Police Officers Rescued After Being Swept Away By Floods

Governor Murphy Declares State of Emergency in Response to Tropical Storm Ida

BREAKING: Reports of NJ Task Force 1 Activation For Tornado In South Jersey And Flooding

Tornado Emergency Take Cover!

City of Trenton to Start Voluntary Evacuation Proceedings in High-Risk Flood Zones

Tornado Warning


Video Hamilton Township Sweetbriar Avenue and Whitehead Road area:


Video by: Ryan Mack, Jersey Shore Fire Response



“As Mercer County begins to fully grasp and assess the destruction caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, I wish to thank the heroic first responders, the police, firefighters, EMTs, emergency workers and public works professionals, who worked throughout the day and night to save lives. The courage and commitment our first responders have displayed throughout this crisis is awe-inspiring and appreciated.

It is with great sadness that I report that despite the countless rescues that took place overnight, we know that at least two Mercer County souls have been lost.

To our residents who have been displaced from their homes or who have lost property, Mercer County is here to assist you. For those who made it through the storm without harm, I encourage you to check on the well-being of your friends and neighbors and to offer comfort in any way you can. 

Finally, I also wish to thank Gov. Phil Murphy for his quick action in declaring a State of Emergency in New Jersey, which will allow Mercer County to seek federal reimbursement for its disaster response and help us begin to pick up the pieces and recover.” — Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes


Princeton: Due to the heavy rainfall last night, Princeton experienced severe flooding and numerous roadways were closed as a result. At approximately 11:43 PM, PPD, PFARS and PFD were dispatched for a swift water rescue on Rosedale Rd. near the Johnson Park School. All responding personnel made efforts to rescue the stranded motorist, who was identified as a 58 year-old Princeton resident. While rescue efforts were attempted, the motorist climbed onto the roof of his vehicle as the water continued to rise at a rapid rate. Due to the unsafe water level and dangerous current rescue efforts were unsuccessful. As a result, requests were made for the NJSP aviation unit to respond and assist. At 4:08 AM the victim was successfully hoisted into the helicopter and flown to Trenton Mercer Airport for evaluation. Mutual aid was received by Lawrenceville Fire Co., Princeton Junction Fire Co., Hamilton Fire Dept., Trenton Fire Dept. and the Pennsauken FD High Water Truck.

During the aforementioned rescue, a second motorist became stranded with high rising waters on Rt. 206 in the area of Quaker Rd. The resident was identified at 30 year-old Montgomery resident. The PPD, PFARS and PFD all responded. The swift moving water flooded the roadway and began to flood the motorist’s vehicle, forcing the driver to escape onto the roof of the vehicle while emergency rescue efforts were made. The Trenton FD responded with a ladder truck, which drove into the flooded roadway and extended its 100 ft ladder, which was used to rescue the motorist.









...7 CONFIRMED TORNADOES SO FAR...
 ...DAMAGE SURVEYS CONTINUE...
 
 .Update...Update to include survey results for Harrisonville-Mullica Hill- 
 Deptford tornado. 
 
 The National Weather Service office in Mount Holly, NJ continues 
 to conduct several storm surveys this afternoon. The surveys are 
 in relation to the severe thunderstorms that moved through the 
 area on September 1, 2021. 
 
 Some Preliminary Tornado Information...
 
 1) Mullica Hill, NJ area (Gloucester County): Confirmed EF-3 with
 estimated peak winds up to 150 mph tornado.
 
 2) Fort Washington/Upper Dublin Twp to Horsham Twp, PA
 (Montgomery County): Confirmed EF-2 with estimated peak winds up 
 to 130 mph. 
 
 3) Edgewater Park, NJ (Burlington County) to Bristol, PA (Bucks 
 County): Confirmed EF-1 with estimated peak winds up to 90 mph.
 
 4) Oxford, PA (Chester County): Confirmed tornado.
 
 5) Buckingham Twp, PA (Bucks County): Confirmed EF-1 with
 estimated peak winds up to 100 mph.
 
 6) Princeton, NJ (Mercer County): Confirmed EF-0 with estimated
 peak winds up to 75 mph.
 
 7) Upper Makefield Township, PA (Bucks County): Confirmed tornado.
 
 Additional information, as it becomes available, will be sent via
 Public Information Statements and also posted on our social media
 platforms.
 






SOUTH BRUNSWICK, NJ (MIDDLESEX)–The remnants of Hurricane Ida created major flash flooding last evening and overnight. The heavy rain started around 5 PM and by 11:30 PM over 8 inches of rain had fallen in the Township. In the twelve hours after the heavy rain began to fall, there were 125 calls for police, fire, and EMS service. Two families who were trapped in vehicles were rescued by firefighters and briefly sheltered at police headquarters. There were no serious injuries as a result of the storm. As of 3 PM Thursday all roads have been cleared of floodwaters with the exception of Route 27 at the Princeton border. Here are some of the numbers from the storm –

TOTAL CALLS – 125

WATER RESCUES – 15 people

Between 8:30 PM and 11:45 PM Wednesday night, firefighters rescued 15 people from vehicles stuck in flash floodwaters around the Township. Here are the locations the rescues occurred at –

  • Kendall Park Fire Department – Route 1, Oakey Drive, Hawthorne Road, Shelly Road
  • Monmouth Junction Fire Department – Route 130, Major Road, Blackhorse Lane
  • Kingston Fire Department – Route 1, Mapleton Road, Raymond Road

MOTORIST ASSIST IN HIGH WATER CALLS – 51

TOTAL CARS TOWED FROM FLOODED ROADS – 33

ROADS STILL CLOSED – 1 (Route 27 / Princeton Border)

FLOODED BASEMENT CALLS – 11

South Brunswick Office of Emergency Management Director and Police Chief Raymond Hayducka said, “I want to thank all the police officers and firefighters who risked going into flooded waters to get people to safety. The flash flooding created life-threatening conditions in minutes. The conditions yesterday deteriorated rapidly last evening and too many people ventured out onto the roads. The property damage left behind will be cleaned up in the coming days, but we must all remember to stay off roads when flash flooding is present.”

Tornado Warning

September 1, 2021

MOUNT HOLLY, NJ (BURLINGTON)–The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for the following areas. Check the Mount Holly National Weather Service page for further details.

The National Weather Service in Mount Holly NJ has issued a

* Tornado Warning for...
  Southeastern Hunterdon County in northwestern New Jersey...
  Northwestern Mercer County in central New Jersey...
  Southwestern Somerset County in northern New Jersey...
  Central Bucks County in southeastern Pennsylvania...

* Until 630 PM EDT.

* At 557 PM EDT, a severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado
  was located over Ivyland, or 16 miles west of Trenton, moving
  northeast at 50 mph.

  HAZARD...Tornado.

  SOURCE...Radar indicated rotation. This storm has a history of
           produicing a tornado.

  IMPACT...Flying debris will be dangerous to those caught without
           shelter. Mobile homes will be damaged or destroyed.
           Damage to roofs, windows, and vehicles will occur.  Tree
           damage is likely.

* Locations impacted include...
  Ewing, Princeton, Doylestown, Byram, Flemington, Chalfont,
  Pennington, New Hope, Hopewell, Ivyland, Rocky Hill, Stockton,
  Washington Crossing, Skillman, Lumberville, Sergeantsville,
  Cloverhill, Gardenville, Sand Brook and Richboro.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

TAKE COVER NOW! Move to a basement or an interior room on the lowest
floor of a sturdy building. Avoid windows. If you are outdoors, in a
mobile home, or in a vehicle, move to the closest substantial shelter
and protect yourself from flying debris.

Heavy rainfall may hide this tornado. Do not wait to see or hear the
tornado. TAKE COVER NOW!





Tropical Storm Ida Stories Here:

Tropical Storm Ida Floods Lawrence Township 100+ Displaced

2 Tropical Storm Ida Related Fatalities And 50 Rescues Made In Hopewell Township Floods

BREAKING: House Explodes In Manville, NJ

Tropical Storm Ida Pounds Area, Tornados, Flash Floods, Rescues Made, Deaths Reported

City of Trenton Continuing Evacuation Proceedings in High-Risk Flood Zones as Water Levels Rise Again

Trenton Evacuates “The Island” In Preparation Of Anticipated Flooding

BREAKING: “Miracle In Mercer County” As 3 Police Officers Rescued After Being Swept Away By Floods

Governor Murphy Declares State of Emergency in Response to Tropical Storm Ida

BREAKING: Reports of NJ Task Force 1 Activation For Tornado In South Jersey And Flooding

Tornado Emergency Take Cover!

City of Trenton to Start Voluntary Evacuation Proceedings in High-Risk Flood Zones

Tornado Warning


Juneteenth Celebrated At Mercer County Stables

June 19, 2021

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)-The Mercer County Park Commission joined the African American Cultural Collaborative in celebration of Juneteenth today, June 19, 2021 at the Mercer County Stables.

Visitors learned about Black Equestrians and the fascinating history of Black Cowboys!

To learn more about the Juneteenth celebrations, see www.taacf.com

Photo gallery of today’s event below:


Photos by Brian McCarthy, OnScene News



Shop Rite And One Tree Plant 125 Saplings In Rosedale Park

The project is part of an effort to plant 25,000 trees in areas where ShopRite stores operate.

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April 21, 2021

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP – PENNINGTON, NJ (MERCER)–Volunteers from ShopRite and One Tree Planted branched out across Rosedale Park in Pennington, NJ on April 19 to help create a more sustainable future by planting 125 saplings as part of ShopRite’s ongoing efforts to plant 25,000 trees in areas where our stores operate. 

Equipped with gloves, shovels and an array of other tools, volunteers dug holes, planted trees and erected deer fencing to ensure the saplings would have the best chance to take root and thrive.  The tree planting initiative, now in its third year, will result in 75,000 trees being planted in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware and Maryland by the end of the year.

“Our annual tree planting event is a highlight of our sustainability efforts that are designed to promote a greener, cleaner and more beautiful environment for future generations,” said Robert Zuehlke, Manager of Corporate Social Responsibility for ShopRite.  “We are proud to partner with One Tree Planted to help bring 75,000 trees to states across the mid-Atlantic.”

The benefits of trees include moderating climate, improving air quality, reducing storm water runoff, and harboring wildlife. They also serve as a windbreak, provide protection from rainfall, and act as a filter for the air we breathe by removing dust and releasing oxygen. Trees also have social benefits that include having a calming effect that reduces stress and fatigue, while also promoting healing.

“We’re proud of our continued partnership with ShopRite,” said Matt Hill, Chief Environmental Evangelist at One Tree Planted. “Thanks to our shared commitment to the environment we’re able to plant trees across the US, protect biodiversity and water quality, and get the local community involved.”

For more than four decades, Wakefern Food Corp., the retailer owned cooperative that includes nearly 280 ShopRite stores, has worked to protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and assist communities where our stores operate.  Last year alone, Wakefern donated 5,000 tons of food to local food banks, composted more than 8,200 tons of food waste, and since the late 1970’s has recycled more than 2.6 million tons of materials. 

For more information on how ShopRite is celebrating Earth Day, and our ongoing sustainability efforts, please visit:  www.shoprite.com/earthmonth2021, and https://shop.shoprite.com/sustainability

Introducing Mercer County Military Action Council

March 23, 2021

TRENTON (March 23, 2021) – Two Mercer County residents with ties to the Armed Forces have founded the Mercer County Military Action Council (MCMAC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting the service members and the mission of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (JB MDL), as well as active-duty personnel, reservists, guardsmen, veterans and their respective families living in local towns.

Regina Arcuri of Robbinsville and William “Bill” Cleave of Pennington, both honorary commanders at JB MDL, created this nonprofit organization in January 2021.  They joined forces with Alan Gilmore, an attorney from Pennington, and David A. Lauer, CPA of Hamilton to complete the council’s executive board. The council launched its website this week.

Arcuri, chairwoman of MCMAC, encourages Mercer County area business owners, local government officials and residents to join the organization. “We need a military support organization here in Mercer County not only to support the service members and the mission of the base, but also to inform local businesses that they can tap into a highly skilled and responsible workforce.”

Arcuri has been active in other military support organizations based in Ocean and Burlington counties for years. She soon realized that many military families live and work here in Mercer, many of whom silently struggle to fit into their adopted (and often temporary) communities. “These families would benefit from a military support organization located close to home,” she said.

“Supporting the base and these families helps everyone who lives in our county. We all need each other,” she added.

Cleave, vice chairman of the organization, noted that his father served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, including the D-Day invasion at Omaha Beach, and then in the reserves during the Korean War. His parents, he said, taught him to honor the sacrifices of the men and women in uniform and their families. “Helping to establish this organization is my way of paying it forward,” he said.

Both Arcuri, who retired last year as a deputy director of New Jersey Lottery after more than 30 years with the state agency, and Cleave, co-owner of Flagship Insurance Agency in Pennington, have been involved in the Honorary Commander Program at JB MDL for several years. Arcuri joined the installation’s first group of honorary commanders inducted into the emeritus program when it was created in 2017.

The purpose of the Honorary Commander Program is to increase public awareness of the installation’s mission and to foster a supportive relationship between military commanders and civic leaders. The goal is to educate civilian volunteers on the various missions of each service branch and to encourage communication between installation commanders and surrounding towns. Honorary commanders are required to complete condensed training exercises that mimic those of service members in their respective branches, tour base operations to learn the mission of each branch, attend base ceremonies, and spend time with service members to understand how local communities can better assist them.

MCMAC will allow Arcuri and Cleave to continue the important work of communicating the base’s mission and goals, as well as the needs of service members and military families, to its membership, who, in turn, will further the message to their friends and family.

Arcuri said it has been their privilege to serve as honorary commanders. “Through that program Bill and I became acutely aware of the base’s economic impact on New Jersey,” Arcuri said. “It’s now up to MCMAC to educate local government officials, business leaders and residents as to how they can help maintain this valuable asset that benefits all of us.”   

Gilmore, of The Gilmore Firm LLC, serves as secretary of the organization, while Lauer serves as treasurer.

 “Joining MCMAC is an easy way to show that you care about the people who help to protect our country,” Gilmore said, adding that his father was a Marine who fought in the Pacific Rim during World War II. “His service is a source of pride that should be recognized by everyone and should not be taken for granted, which will hopefully promote and continue the tradition of service.”

Lauer, a partner in Five Points Financial in Hamilton, has worked with many military personnel during his accounting career. “Without fail, I have found them to be the most respectful, appreciative, and forthright group of individuals to work with,” Lauer said. “Paying it back by joining the Mercer County Military Action Council’s executive board was a decision I made without hesitation.”

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst was formed in 2009 as the nation’s only tri-service installation – uniquely capable of projecting air, land and sea power in support of our nation’s defense. The base serves as an economic engine for our entire region. The base is the second largest employer in New Jersey, contributing $6.9 billion annually to our state economy. More than 42,000 active-duty personnel and civilians work and live on and around the base.

“The installation is an incredible resource and we’re lucky to have it in our backyard,” Cleave said.

Aside from hosting fundraisers and military appreciation events, MCMAC will hold networking events so local business leaders can meet base commanders and procurement agents. The organization will also encourage local businesses to tap into the talent on base and offer transitioning service members an opportunity to use their skills in the civilian workplace.

MCMAC is now accepting sponsorships and memberships through its website. For more information about the Mercer County Military Action Council, visit www.mcmilitaryactioncouncil.org.

Mission Statement: Mercer County Military Action Council serves as a liaison between Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst commanders and the civilian community to foster a meaningful dialogue of their shared interests, and to collectively meet the needs of service members on base as well as active-duty personnel, reservists, guardsmen, veterans and their respective families living in our communities.




BREAKING: House Fire Extinguished In Hopewell Township

January 24, 2021

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Around 9:40 am Hopewell Township along with several other area fire departments were dispatched to the 400 Block of Lambertville Hopewell Road for a house fire. The first arriving fire officer on scene reported smoke from the structure calling for a 1st alarm and a 2nd Alarm tanker task force was called to the scene. This is remote a non-fire hydrant area and water needs to be trucked in by tankers.

There were reports of advancing a 2 1/2 inch line to the second floor along with other hand lines. The fire was under control by 10:17 am. A witness photo provided from the driveway and the street shows that fire was though the roof at one point during the fire and it appears that the majority of the home was saved.

Departments from Mercer, Hunterdon and Middlesex responded to the scene of the fire.

This is a breaking news story from radio reports and witnesses on scene once official information is received the story will be updated and any additions and corrections made.



Mega Millions $1 Billion Ticket Sold In Michigan, $1Million In Ocean County, $10K Tickets Sold Locally, Tonight’s Cash 5 Passes $2 Million Record

January 23, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–

TRENTON (Jan. 23, 2021– One Michigan ticket matched all five of the five white balls and the Gold Mega Ball drawn winning the $1.05 billion Mega Millions jackpot. The estimated cash value was $776.6 million.

In New Jersey, there was one second-tier prizewinning ticket sold for the Friday, January 22, drawing that matched five of the five white balls drawn winning the $1,000,000 prize. The ticket was purchased at 7-Eleven #11027, 2075 Route 88, Brick in Ocean County.

There were ten third-tier prizewinning tickets sold that matched four of the five white balls and the gold ball winning $10,000. Those tickets were purchased at the following locations:

  • Bergen County: Krauszer’s Food Store, 403 Midland Ave., Garfield;
  • Burlington County: Wawa #8423, 76 Springside Rd., Westampton;
  • Mercer County: 7-Eleven #27391, 1517 Pennington Ave., Ewing;
  • Mercer County: Pennington Luk Oil LLC, 2558 Pennington Rd., Pennington;
  • Middlesex County: Park Deli, 80 Raritan Ave., Highland Park;
  • Monmouth County: Little Silver Family Pharmacy, 10 Church St., Little Silver;
  • Morris County: Krauszer’s Food Store, 95 West Main St., Chester;
  • Passaic County: 7-Eleven #11463, 356 Rifle Camp Rd., Woodland Park;
  • Sussex County: 7-Eleven #37251, 63 Water St., Newton; and,
  • Warren County: Mini Mart, 1312 US Highway 22 East, Phillipsburg.

In addition to the second and third-tier prizes won, 236 players matched four of the five white balls drawn making each ticket worth $50015 of those tickets were purchased with the Megaplier option, multiplying the prizes to $1,000. Moreover, 389,264 other New Jersey players took home $1,455,848 in prizes ranging from $2 to $400. The winning numbers for the Friday, January 22, drawing were: 04, 26, 42, 50, and 60. The Gold Mega Ball was 24, and the Megaplier Multiplier was 02.

The jackpot resets to $20 million for the next drawing on Tuesday, January 26, at 11:00 pm. All New Jersey Lottery Mega Millions tickets must be purchased before 10:45 pm to participate in the drawing. Mega Millions tickets cost just two dollars; by adding the Megaplier option for an extra dollar per play, players can increase their non-jackpot winnings up to five times. Mega Millions tickets are sold in 46 participating jurisdictions. Drawings are held on Tuesdays and Fridays.


Jersey Cash 5 Boasts the Biggest Cash Jackpot EVER

Jersey Cash 5 Leaps to Record $2 Million Jackpot

TRENTON (Jan. 23, 2021) – New Jersey Lottery would like to announce the record-breaking jackpot for tonight’s Jersey Cash 5 drawing. The drawing for the all-cash jackpot of $2 million happens tonight at 10:57 pm, so be sure to get your tickets in time. The $2 million jackpot is the highest jackpot for Jersey Cash 5, ever – topping the 2013 record of $1.96 million.

With daily drawings and jackpots starting at $100,000, seeing jackpots top the million-dollar milestone is a rare treat for the game’s loyal players, but the two-million-dollar jackpot breaks new ground for the Jersey Cash 5 record books. For just a dollar, Jersey Cash 5 is a great option for players to pick their lucky numbers – or go with a Quick Pick option – and hope for the five-out-of-five match tonight.

Jersey Cash 5, which held its first drawing in 1992, has already proven to be a vital component of the Lottery’s offerings to support our State.

Mercer County Sheriff Warns Of Phone Scam

January 22, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Once again, Mercer County Sheriff Jack Kemler has issued a warning to area residents regarding telephone scammers posing as Mercer County Sheriff’s Officers. Over the past month, the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office has received numerous complaints about suspected phone scams asking residents for personal bank account information or cash payments. Some calls have reached residents throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The scammers identify themselves as Mercer County Sheriff’s Officers along with fictitious badge numbers. The callers state they have an arrest warrant related to money laundering charges and need access to their bank accounts. The scammers also suggest meeting at a location and to bring cash for bail or fines. Otherwise, they will be taken into custody. “I can state with confidence the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office will never call anyone and ask for their bank account number or to meet in an odd location to pay bail or fines with cash,” said Sheriff Kemler.Unfortunately, it is difficult to crack down on telephone scammers because calls are often generated from phone banks located out of state. While the calls remain under investigation, the best advice is to exercise common sense. If a resident suspects a particular telephone call may be a scam, do not give out any personal information and simply hang up. Anyone who receives such a call and is uncertain of its validity should report the call to the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office at 609-989-6111.

COVID-19 Vaccination Sites Planned At CURE Arena And MCCC

January 16, 2021

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County plans on opening an COVID-19 vaccination site at CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton in partnership with Capital Health System. An additional vaccination site is planned at Mercer County Community College and will be managed by the County Health Officer’s Association. See full press rease below from Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes:

Dear Mercer County Community,

The State of New Jersey this week ramped up its COVID-19 vaccination efforts, and Mercer County is preparing to do the same. The County will open a vaccination site at CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton in partnership with Capital Health System, which will manage the site. The opening date is dependent on vaccine supply but a soft opening is planned next week.

We had a successful partnership with Capital Health during the COVID-19 testing program we established last spring, and I can’t think of a more fitting partner for this next phase of the pandemic response – the vaccination phase. Like other vaccination locations, this site will be for those eligible under the state’s phasing plan that is designed to ensure that those most at risk are prioritized.

Mercer County also is working on opening a vaccination site  at Mercer County Community College that would be managed by the County Health Officers Association and utilize all of the resources and staffing available from the municipal and county health offices. The arena and MCCC vaccination locations will supplement, not replace, smaller sites including those currently being operated by municipal health departments and other health care facilities in Mercer County. If you have questions about the CURE Insurance Arena or MCCC vaccination sites, please email publichealth@mercercounty.org.

As of this morning, at least 7,342 vaccine doses had been administered in Mercer County, according to the state Department of Health. While we all want to see that number grow exponentially, we are simply not getting enough vaccine from the federal government, and we are using every single dose we receive. 

I ask that everyone be patient throughout what will be a months-long vaccination process and continue to take basic preventive measures to reduce the spread of the virus, which is still rampant in our community and seemingly everywhere else. Wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth; keep a least 6 feet away from other people; practice good hand hygiene; avoid large gatherings; and stay home if you are sick.

Anyone can – and everyone should – pre-register to receive a vaccination by visiting the state’s online portal at https://covidvaccine.nj.gov. The state expects to have a consumer call center up and running soon to assist people without Internet access in scheduling appointments, and to help answer general inquiries and questions. Those who have pre-registered will be notified when they are eligible to make a vaccination appointment. The state is compiling a list of designated vaccination locations for eligible recipients. That list will continue to grow.

For more information on who is eligible, and how to get vaccinated if you are eligible, please visit the state’s COVID-19 Vaccine website.

In addition to vaccinations, Mercer County continues to respond to the pandemic through testing, contact tracing and support. The County, in partnership with Vault Health Services, is offering a free COVID-19 saliva test on the next two Tuesdays – Jan. 19 and 26 – at the CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton. For details, please visit the COVID-19 Testing page on the County website, where you’ll also find information on the County’s at-home testing program.

These are trying times but we will get through them. Let’s continue to support each other and keep each other safe. Let’s continue to work together.

Brian M. Hughes

Mercer County Executive



Mercer County Health Officer Association Distribution Of Moderna Vaccine To Health Care Workers

The first Mercer County COVID-19 vaccine clinic was held in Hamilton today at Station 17

December 28, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–Hamilton Township in collaboration with the Mercer County Health Officer Association (MCHOA) held the first COVID-19 vaccine clinic earlier today to Phase 1A healthcare workers.

In order to maximize COVID vaccination efforts, the Mercer County Health Officers Association has joined together to serve all communities within Mercer County throughout the four phases of the COVID-19 vaccination distribution. Under CDC and State health guidelines, the Moderna doses will first be distributed to healthcare workers who qualify under Phase 1A and who have not been vaccinated for COVID-19 through their employer or the federal Pharmacy Partnership for Long Term Care (LTC) Program administered through CVS and Walgreens.

This MCHOA is currently planning a series of COVID-19 vaccination clinics to support ongoing efforts to vaccinate healthcare workers which include emergency medical services. The MCHOA will administer the Moderna COVID-19 vaccinations at clinics throughout Mercer County municipalities point of dispensing (POD) locations.  The clinics will be held twice a week on a rotating schedule and have the capacity to handle 500 vaccines per week.. The COVID-19 vaccine clinics will be by appointment only and subject to the availability of vaccine doses on hand or accessible within the supply chain.

“Hamilton Township is proud to partner with the Mercer County Health Officer Association in order to ensure that those on the frontlines in our fight against this virus receive the vaccine as quickly as possible,” said Mayor Jeff Martin. “The arrival of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is a continued step forward to provide protection to more of our community’s critical healthcare workforce and eventually the general adult population.”

“Vaccination is a critical component to protecting our residents,” stated Hamilton Township Health Officer Christopher Hellwig. “Working together to safeguard the citizens of Mercer County is exactly what the founding members of the MCHOA had in mind when they formed in 1972. Our vaccination clinics will continue that ideal and work to protect the public’s health particularly those that have been most impacted by COVID-19, while giving us a clear end to this pandemic.”

Local Health Departments are one piece of the puzzle to vaccinate the State goal of 70% of the adult population in 6 months. This collective effort will ensure that our residents are provided with the opportunity to receive their vaccination in a timely manner and in a safe medical setting.  COVID-19 vaccines will continue to be rolled out in phases determined by the State. The Mercer County Health Officers Association collaboration will continue to work closely with federal, state, and local partners.

Around 1,600 Pounds Of Frozen Turkey Distributed This Afternoon At Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church

November 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–The Willing Workers of Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church and members of Mercer County’s PBAs (Police Benevolent Associations) distributed frozen turkeys and food baskets late this afternoon at the church on North Clinton Avenue.

There were at least thirty boxes of frozen turkeys distributed with an average weight of around 55 pounds per box for a total of about 1,600 pounds. There were numerous baskets of food and turkey baking supplies provided to go along with the frozen birds.

There were several locations today for turkey distribution see this morning’s MidJersey.News story here: Mercer County PBA Assists With Turkey Distribution



Mercer County PBA Assists With Turkey Distribution

November 23, 2020

By: Tyler Eckel

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–All chapters of the Mercer County PBA are assisting with turkey distribution in Mercer County today. This morning at Saint Phillips Baptist Church, members unloaded over 600 pounds of turkey for distribution at that location.

There were two other locations with many more pounds donated this morning including the Hamilton YMCA.

The distribution will continue this evening at the Willing Workers of Jerusalem Baptist Church in Trenton at 4:00 pm.



Mercer County Offering Free COVID-19 Testing November 24 & December 1 at Cure Arena

Mercer County is also proud to offer free at-home COVID-19 testing. These tests are available to all residents of Mercer County, free of charge.

November 18, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes today announced that the County, in partnership with Vault Health Services, will offer free COVID-19 testing on Tuesday, Nov. 24, and Tuesday, Dec. 1, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the CURE Insurance Arena, 81 Hamilton Ave. The saliva test is available to County residents 14 years or older and anyone employed as a first responder or health care worker in Mercer County.

Those going to the arena for testing should use Parking Lot 2 off South Broad Street to access Gate A. Testing will be conducted in the arena concourse. Bring identification showing Mercer County residency and a smartphone or tablet if you have one. No prescription is necessary. Please avoid eating, drinking, chewing gum or smoking 30 minutes prior to taking the test.

Testing will be limited to 300 people on each of the two days but additional pop-up testing sites will be scheduled around the County in the near future.

If you want to avoid the lines, Mercer County also offers an at-home saliva test for COVID-19, which can be requested by visiting www.mercercares.org. If you need help with the online registration process, assistance will be available Tuesday at the arena. 



Covid-19 Test at Home Program

Mercer County is proud to offer free at-home COVID-19 testing. These tests are available to all residents of Mercer County, free of charge.

The saliva collection test for COVID-19 has the same effectiveness as the nasal swab test. This test is performed under the supervision of our healthcare provider, Vault, through a video telehealth visit eliminating the risk of person-to-person exposure to the virus.

To register for your at-home testing kit, you must first fill out the form below to verify your Mercer County residency. Within 24-48 hours following your submission, you will receive a link to order your free kit on the Vault Health website. This is FREE to all Mercer County residents, and health insurance is not required but a claim will be submitted if are covered.

Please note the following:

  1. There is no out of pocket cost for this test.
  2. You must be a resident of Mercer County or employed as a first responder or health care worker in Mercer County.
  3. Only persons over the age of 14 are eligible for this test. Persons under the age of 18 should have a parent or guardian complete the registration for them.
  4. You will receive your code within 48 hours.
  5. This is not an antibody test. This test is designed to determine if you currently are infected with COVID-19 and have the potential to infect others.

If your test is positive, or if you have symptoms, call your health care professional.

Mayors And Local Government Officials Warn New COVID-19 Cases On Rise And To Take Precautions

November 14, 2020

MERCER COUNTY, NJ–Mayors and local officials warn of increased COVID-19 transmission as cases rise in Mercer County. Officials are reminding residents to continue to take precautions by limiting gatherings, wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and other general COVID-19 precautions.

In the City of Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora has announced new restrictions as COVID-19 transmission rates have doubled in each of the last three weeks.

Trenton’s transmission rate is currently 44.2 cases per 100,000 people, which exceeds both the state and county rates at 29.3 and 28.9, respectively. Trenton has had a total of 4,598 COVID-19 cases with 80 related deaths.

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes stated, Mercer County surpassed 10,000 cumulative positive test results since the start of the pandemic, and the United States surpassed a staggering 10 million positive cases. In addition, the New Jersey Department of Health has reported more than 13,000 positive cases statewide since Monday.

It was anticipated that colder weather in the fall and winter would drive people indoors and trigger a second wave of virus transmissions. We’re only in mid-November and the second wave is here. New cases of COVID-19 are on the rise and everyone needs to take that seriously, County Executive Hughes stated.

Robbinsville Township Mayor Dave Fried said in a Facebook post, “I always like to start with good news, but a second wave of COVID-19 is upon us and it is making that increasingly difficult. I am going to give this to you straight. Since October 30, Robbinsville Township reports 29 new cases that is by far the highest number of new cases we have encountered since this started.”

Mayor Fried also stated in a message that My personal feeling is this second wave will get worse before it gets better, so I am asking people to be increasingly diligent.

Hamilton Township Mayor Jeff Martin shared the weekly update from Hamilton Township that includes a weekly COVID-19 update and that urges the following precautions:

•Keep Your Distance — stay at least six feet away from others — and Wear a Face Covering.

•Wash Your Hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after being in a public place, as well as after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

.•If soap and water are not accessible, Use a Hand Sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

•Avoid Touching Your Eyes, Nose and Mouth with unwashed hands.•Avoid Close Contact with people who are sick.

•Stay Home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.

•Cover Your Mouth and Nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.


Full text of statements below:


TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mayor W. Reed Gusciora yesterday announced new restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of COVID-19 as transmission rates in Trenton have doubled each of the last three weeks.

Mayor Gusciora’s amended State of Emergency declaration now includes the following instructions, which will remain in effect from Nov. 16, 2020 through Dec. 5, 2020:

  • All Trenton businesses, including restaurants, bars and grocery stores must close at 10:00 p.m. daily. Gas stations may stay open only to dispense gas.
  • Restaurants and drive-through businesses may be open for pickup or delivery until 11:00 p.m., provided that no parties are allowed to congregate inside or outside of the establishment.
  • All city residents are encouraged to remain indoors after 10:00 p.m.
  • All city residents should wear masks and practice social distancing techniques as recommended by the CDC by avoiding large crowds, and, whenever possible, keeping a distance of six feet from other people.
  • All city residents are strongly encouraged not to have large family gatherings on Thanksgiving and to avoid hosting visitors from states that are on the Governor’s travel advisory list.

Trenton’s transmission rate is currently 44.2 cases per 100,000 people, which exceeds both the state and county rates at 29.3 and 28.9, respectively. Trenton has had a total of 4,598 COVID-19 cases with 80 related deaths.

“It’s clear the second wave is here and has hit the Capital City especially hard,” said Mayor Gusciora. “Our transmission rates may even be higher now than they were in the spring. While we believe these new restrictions will help, we won’t get past this crisis unless our residents wear their masks and practice social distancing. No more excuses about COVID-19 fatigue: the virus never gets tired, and neither should our residents and businesses when it comes to keeping this city safe.”

“It is critically important that when we see cases rise throughout our city, county and state that we are extremely cautious and we social distance, wear masks and limit indoor gatherings as much as possible,” said Dr. Kemi Alli, Chief Executive Officer of the Henry J. Austin Health Center. “If not, our path will follow sister states such as North and South Dakota, and Montana which are currently in dire straits.”

While transmission rates have risen across all age groups, a quarter of all hospitalizations over the past month are comprised of individuals age 30 and below. The greatest source of transmission has been indoor contact, and residents are advised to wear masks even around friends or relatives who are visiting.


Mercer County, NJ:

A letter from County Executive Brian M. Hughes

Mercer County and the nation both reached sobering COVID-19 milestones this week: Mercer County surpassed 10,000 cumulative positive test results since the start of the pandemic, and the United States surpassed a staggering 10 million positive cases. In addition, the New Jersey Department of Health has reported more than 13,000 positive cases statewide since Monday. It was anticipated that colder weather in the fall and winter would drive people indoors and trigger a second wave of virus transmissions. We’re only in mid-November and the second wave is here. New cases of COVID-19 are on the rise and everyone needs to take that seriously.

When you’re around people outside your own household, wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth and practice social distancing. Wash your hands frequently and use hand sanitizer. Avoid crowds and stay home if you are sick. Public health officials are advising that the safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is to keep your gathering small with just immediate family. Please bear that in mind when planning for the holiday. We know what we need to do to reduce the spread of the virus – now it’s up to us. Let’s continue to support each other and keep each other safe. Let’s continue to work together.

One of the many impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic has been job loss. State officials reported this week that more than 1.7 million New Jersey workers have filed an unemployment claim since March, with about 1.46 million workers meeting the monetary requirements to receive benefits. Jobseekers need all the help they can get, and with that in mind I’d like to call attention to the work being done by the staff at the Mercer County One-Stop Career Center.

As part of Mercer County’s ongoing effort to connect jobseekers with employers, and do it safely during the public health crisis, our One-Stop recently held a drive-through job fair at the CURE Insurance Arena in Trenton that had the participation of 45 employers and was attended by about 525 individuals. Attendees were required to wear face masks but did not have to leave their vehicles. When they pulled up, they were handed a bag filled with information provided by employers on the jobs they had available, along with information about One-Stop services and community resources. This was a successful effort to help people in our community find work.

The inventive job fair came on the heels of the One-Stop’s equally successful Summer Youth Jobs Connection program. After receiving grant funding from the state in early June, One-Stop Director Virgen Velez and her staff set about making the summer job program a reality, despite a small time window and challenges presented by the pandemic. The program, which served Mercer County residents between the ages of 16 and 24, provided a paid six-week work experience and paid virtual job readiness workshops, along with transportation assistance.

I join the One-Stop and the County’s Workforce Development Board in thanking the employers who brought interns into their facilities this summer. The young adults learned not only traditional work skills but the virtual communication skills that have become essential in the COVID-19 work and school environment. And I applaud the One-Stop team, whose passionate commitment enabled it to deliver a summer employment program and job fair amid a pandemic.

Brian M. Hughes
Mercer County Executive


Robbinsville, NJ:

Mayor Dave Fried:

I always like to start with good news, but a second wave of COVID-19 is upon us and it is making that increasingly difficult. I am going to give this to you straight. Since October 30, Robbinsville Township reports 29 new cases that is by far the highest number of new cases we have encountered since this started.

Thankfully, we have not seen significant spread or sickness in our three schools. We are seeing an uptick in cases throughout Mercer County, including increased positives reported by our first responders and front line workers resulting in staffing shortages. We have seen an uptick in hospitalizations across Mercer County.

My personal feeling is this second wave will get worse before it gets better, so I am asking people to be increasingly diligent. We have kids coming home from college for Thanksgiving, and while I am not going to tell you how to host or visit your families, I am asking you to be smart.

There are some things you can do to minimize the spread, such as not sharing glassware or silverware. Try to be more aware when eating in groups. Wash your hands regularly and wear a mask when you can. While many of our cases have been asymptotic, our fear as flu season approaches is we may see people with multiple symptoms for both COVID-19 and the flu, or family members suffering from both in the same household. We are on stand-by to help and volunteer when and where we are needed. We hope you will join us as that need increases.

Additionally, our kids still need to socialize in the face of the virus. That said our Recreation Department, in conjunction with the school district, will be coming up with programs to help keep our children safely engaged. This is a difficult and complex decision … and it will not be for everyone. There will be no right or wrong. It really comes down to what is best for your family, while not judging others.

I am very proud of our community for all it has done to flatten this curve. You all have been rock stars, and it is a pleasure to be Mayor of this incredible town. Keep your chins up. Pfizer has announced they have a vaccine and early reports indicate it is 90 percent effective, so help should be on the way.

We will get through this together. Thank you all for all you do, and God bless you all. —Robbinsville Mayor Dave Fried


Mercer County Firemen’s Association 2020 Memorial Service

November 5, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–The Mercer County Firemen’s Association 2020 Memorial Service that was originally scheduled for May 6, 2020 was postponed several times due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. This year’s Memorial Service was held at Colonial Fire Company Hamilton Township Station 18 and was hosted by Union Fire Company Hopewell Township Station 53. Hamilton Township Station 18 has a large hall and is big enough to hold the service while complying with COVID-19 guidelines.

The annual Memorial Service is held to honor members of Mercer County Firemen’s Ladies Auxiliary and Firefighters in Mercer County. All fire departments in Mercer County are represented and Hope Fire Company of Allentown, Monmouth County is also a member.

This year’s Memorial Roll was read honored 14 Ladies Auxiliary members and 36 firefighters. As each name is read a white carnation is placed in a Maltese cross and firefighters salute and family members stand as the name of their loved one is read.


2020 Mercer County Firemen’s Association Memorial Service. Video by Dick Cunningham, Broadcast Productions-East Windsor Station 46


Mercer County: General Election Vote By Mail Secured Drop Box Locations

All Drop Boxes will be open by October 5, 2020 until General Election Night of November 3, 2020 at 8:00 pm.

October 4, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–Recently a secured election ballot drop box has been installed at the Robbinsville Township Municipal Building. The box is to the left of the rear parking lot entrance to the building. Just look for the flag pole and the box is in that location. There are also signs located in the parking lot to show the way to the secure drop box.


Robbinsville Township Municipal Clerk Michele Seigfried explains the 2020 General Election process on November 3 in the wake of COVID-19 in this informative video.


For the most up to date information on the 2020 elections and drop box locations visit the Mercer County Board of Elections website here and here: Mercer County Board Of Elections

All Active Registered Voters will receive a Mail-In-Ballot that can be placed in a drop box at any one of the fifteen (15) locations (see below), mailed, or hand delivered at the polling location on November 3 from 5:15 am-8:00 pm.

Drop boxes will be open beginning in October 2020 until General Election Night of November 3, 2020 at 8:00 pm.



Secured Drop Box Locations

Please Note: We anticipate more drop boxes, however, at this time do not know how many and in what locations they will be placed. Any and all changes will be updated on the website.

** All Drop Boxes will be open by October 5, 2020

EAST WINDSOR:

  • East Windsor Police Station – 80 One Mile Road, East Windsor, NJ, 08520 (Courthouse)

EWING:

  • Ewing Municipal Building – 2 Jake Garzio Drive, Ewing, NJ, 08628 (In Front)

HAMILTON:

  • Hamilton Golf/Call Center – 5 Justice Samuel A. Alito Way, Hamilton, NJ, 08619
  • Hamilton Municipal Building – 2090 Greenwood Avenue, Hamilton, NJ, 08609 (Right side of Bldg.)
  • Nottingham Firehouse – 200 Mercer Street, Hamilton Square, NJ, 08690 (Right side of Bldg.)

HIGHTSTOWN:

  • Hightstown Firehouse #1 – 140 N. Main Street, Hightstown, NJ, 08520 (Front of Bldg.)

HOPEWELL TWP:

  • Hopewell Township Administration Building – 201 Washington Crossing-Pennington Rd, Titusville, NJ 08560 (at the intersection of Scotch Road)

LAWRENCE:

  • Lawrence Municipal Building – 2207 Lawrenceville Rd, (Rt 206) Lawrence, NJ 08648 (North Side-Right Side of the Municipal Bldg.)

PRINCETON:

  • Princeton Municipal Building – 400 Witherspoon St, Princeton, NJ, 08540(Front of Bldg. facing  Witherspoon)

ROBBINSVILLE:

  • Robbinsville Municipal Building, 2298 NJ-33, Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (In back parking lot of Municipal Bldg.)

TRENTON:

  • County Clerk’s Office- Courthouse Annex- 209 S. Broad Street, Trenton, NJ, 08608 (in front)
  • Trenton City Hall – 319 E. State Street, Trenton, NJ, 08608 (In back/ near Municipal Clerks Office)
  • Henry J. Austin Center – 321 N. Warren St, Trenton, NJ, 08618(Corner of Tucker)
  • Trenton Central High School – 400 Chambers Street, Trenton, NJ, 08609(across from McDonald’s)

WEST WINDSOR:

  • West Windsor Municipal Complex, 271 Clarksville Rd, West Windsor, NJ,08550 (Between the Municipal building and the Senior Center)

Home Energy Assistance Available To Eligible Mercer County Residents, LIHEAP Application Period Opens Today

October 1, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes is reminding residents that assistance is available for energy costs for those who qualify beginning Oct. 1, but that applicants must adhere to certain COVID-19 restrictions. The County’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), offered in coordination with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, is designed to help low-income families and individuals meet home heating and medically necessary cooling costs.This year, the LIHEAP application period is Oct. 1, 2020, to July 31, 2021. Mercer County will continue accepting applications for the Universal Service Fund (USF) Program throughout the year. Residents who pay their own heating costs, and meet the income guidelines, may be eligible to receive financial assistance with their winter heating bill. Residents with medical conditions also may be eligible to receive cooling assistance. An eligibility chart can be found on the Mercer County website.

“The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have created financial hardships for many households that now have to worry about the cost of heating and other energy bills,” Mr. Hughes said. “I urge our low-income residents to visit our website or contact the County housing office to determine their eligibility to apply for energy assistance.”

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the public may visit the Mercer County Office of Housing and Community Development, located at 640 South Broad St., Trenton, by appointment only. If an in-person visit is necessary, clients can call 609-337-0933 or email heatingappt@mercercounty.org to schedule an appointment.

Beginning Oct. 1, the County will temporarily begin operating an outdoor informational center adjacent to the 640 South Broad St. building. Clients will be able to drop off applications and access information from LIHEAP staff. 

The County will continue to accept applications by regular mail, fax and email until July 31, 2021. Applications, forms and information are available on the Mercer County website.

Troopers Help Plant Trees to Improve Quality of Water at Rosedale Park

September 28, 2020

PENNINGTON, NJ (MERCER)–On Friday, September 25, members of the Public Information Bureau volunteered their time to help the Mercer County Park Commission plant trees at Rosedale Park in Pennington, N.J.The troopers worked with several other volunteers to help wrap up the week-long project to plant trees and shrubs along the Rosedale Park Lake. Throughout the week, volunteers helped plant approximately 1,200 trees and shrubs, which will help improve water quality in the Stony Brook, feed pollinators, and improve foraging resources for birds. The troopers were glad to assist the Mercer County Park Commission in this outstanding initiative.

2020 Police Unity Tour Bike Ride Held In NJ


See related MidJersey.News coverage here: Police Unity Tour Memorial Service And Blessing Of Riders


September 27, 2020

Check back for more photos, still having photos sent into MidJersey.News and will be updated again tomorrow or later tonight.

STAFFORD TOWNSHIP, NJ (OCEAN)–The Police Unity Tour held a one day bike ride today starting in Asbury Park and proceeding on shore routes towards Stafford Township ending at the Stafford Township Police Memorial.

This year’s spring four day ride that is usually held in May was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic that ends at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. 

This year’s ride was shortened to one day and two hundred sixty police officers participated from fourteen states including California and Missouri.


History of the Police Unity Tour:

In 1997, Florham Park (NJ) Police Officer Patrick Montuore had a simple idea: organize a four-day bicycle ride from New Jersey to Washington, DC to raise public awareness about law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, and to ensure that their sacrifice is never forgotten. With that, the Police Unity Tour was formed. 

What started with 18 riders on a four day fund-raising bicycle ride from Florham Park, NJ to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. has grown into 9 chapters consisting of nearly 2,600 members nationwide who make the trip annually. Participants include riders, motorcycles, and support personnel.

The journey is long and challending but for the Police Unity Tour participants it is what they prepare for throughout the year. Through fundraising and physical training, they know that their efforts raise awareness of the ultimate sacrifice made by so many law enforcement officers. 

The last leg of the jouney ends at the Memorial, where the participants are greeted by friends, family, and survirors. Once there, many Police Unity Tour members present remembrance braclets worn on their wrists throughout the journey to the families of the fallen. 

May 2020, the Police Unity Tour was proud to donate more than $2.0 million to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, bringing our total donations to more than $30 million since their inception. 

The Police Unity Tour is the sponsor of the National Law Enforcement Museum’s Hall of Remembrance, the Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award, and Recently Fallen Alert programs. 








Video provided by: Bucky For Sherriff