Category: Freehold

Man Charged With Terroristic Threats For Allegedly Coughing On Food Store Employee And Telling Her He Has Coronavirus

March 24, 2020

TRENTON – Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal announced that criminal charges were filed today against a man who allegedly coughed on a food store employee in Manalapan, N.J., and told the woman that he has the coronavirus.

George Falcone, 50, of Freehold, N.J., was charged today by complaint-summons with the following criminal offenses:

  • Terroristic Threats (3rd Degree)
  • Obstructing Administration of Law or Other Governmental Function (4th degree)
  • Harassment (Petty Disorderly Persons Offense)

The incident occurred at about 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 22, at the Wegmans on US Highway 9. The employee was concerned that Falcone was standing too close to her and an open display of prepared foods, so she requested that he step back as she covered the food. Instead, Falcone allegedly stepped forward to within 3 feet of her, leaned toward her, and purposely coughed. He allegedly laughed and said he was infected with the coronavirus. Falcone subsequently told two other employees they are lucky to have jobs.

A detective of the Manalapan Police Department was working a security detail at the store and approached Falcone, who allegedly refused to cooperate or provide his name or driver’s license. After approximately 40 minutes, Falcone identified himself and was permitted to leave. Following additional investigation, summonses were issued today which will require Falcone to appear in court at a later date.

The case will be prosecuted by the Division of Criminal Justice within the Attorney General’s Office. Attorney General Grewal thanked the Manalapan Police Department and the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office for their strong response to the incident and investigation leading to today’s charges.

“These are extremely difficult times in which all of us are called upon to be considerate of each other— not to engage in intimidation and spread fear, as alleged in this case,” said Attorney General Grewal. “We must do everything we can to deter this type of conduct and any similar conduct that harms others during this emergency. Just as we are cracking down on bias offenses and those who use the pandemic to fuel hatred and prejudice, we vow to respond swiftly and strongly whenever someone commits a criminal offense that uses the coronavirus to generate panic or discord.”

“Exploiting people’s fears and creating panic during a pandemic emergency is reprehensible. In times like these, we need to find ways to pull together as a community instead of committing acts that further divide us,” said Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

“I commend the officers and detectives involved in this case for bringing criminal charges against the individual responsible for causing additional stress to the employees and patrons of Wegmans during these unprecedented times,” said Manalapan Police Chief Michael Fountain. “It sickens me to think an individual would lower their basic human standards during a time of crisis such as we are experiencing. As evident by these charges, law enforcement will not tolerate individuals breaking the law and placing others in fear during an already tense situation.”

Third-degree charges carry a sentence of three to five years in state prison and a fine of up to $15,000, while fourth-degree charges carry a sentence of up to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. Petty disorderly persons offenses carry a sentence of up to 6 months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

The charges are merely accusations and the defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Defense Attorney: Undetermined.

George Falcone, 50, of Freehold, N.J., was charged today by complaint-summons with the following criminal offenses: Terroristic Threats (3rd Degree)
Obstructing Administration of Law or Other Governmental Function (4th degree)
Harassment (Petty Disorderly Persons Offense)

Congressman Smith Working to Bring Home Americans Trapped in Peru

March 24, 2020

In an urgent phone conversation Saturday, March 21st with U.S. Ambassador to Peru, Krishna Urs, Rep. Chris Smith (NJ-04) a senior member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, urged the Ambassador to reach out to U.S. citizens and reassure those spread-out across Peru that they have not been forgotten nor abandoned.

There are reportedly 5,000 Americans trapped in Peru needing the immediate assistance of the U.S. government in order to get home,” said Smith, who has been contacted by more than a dozen travelers with New Jersey roots.

The Administration has been working on some limited options, but we are asking the State Department to raise the bar and expand their efforts to include chartering planes or using military aircraft.”

Seven hundred Americans, including some from my district, are stuck in parts of Peru, such as Cusco, which is 11,000 feet above sea level where air quality is thin and a strict curfew is enforced.  It’s time to let these Americans and their worried families in the U.S. know that their country will employ more resources to bring them home safely,” Smith said.

In addition to speaking with the Ambassador, Smith has been working with State Department officials for several days. A human rights leader in the Congress, Smith has written three letters to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo outlining the location and needs of the New Jersey residents and others desperate for assistance to come home.

 “I ask your assistance in prioritizing the evacuation from Peru of these and other Americans by any appropriate, practicable and timely manner, including the chartering of private or commercial aircraft or the utilization of military planes,” Smith said in his March 20th letter in which he named specific Americans needing assistance.

Smith also led a letter cosigned by two additional members of the Foreign Affairs Committee which said in part “Amid the press of so many concerns prompted by the coronavirus pandemic, we appreciate the efforts undertaken thus far on behalf of our citizens abroad, but nonetheless ask that you reassure trapped Americans and their families that their needs are being prioritized.”

Americans in Peru and elsewhere around the globe should know that we are doing everything we can to reunite them with their loved ones,” he said.

According to news reports, on March 15 the Peruvian government abruptly announced it would close

all borders, effective March 16, subsequently issuing a 15-day quarantine. It later announced that March 22 would be the final day the country would allow official flights to repatriate foreign visitors before the country closed all borders, effectively trapping many Americans and other international visitors in the South American nation. Further repatriation efforts require diplomatic intervention, something Rep. Smith is urging our Ambassador and State Department to prioritize.

Governor Murphy, Governor Cuomo, and Governor Lamont Announce Regional Approach to Combatting COVID-19

March 16, 2020

The three States will limit crowd capacity for recreational and social gatherings to 50 people – effective by 8 PM tonight 

Restaurants and bars will close for on premise service and move to take-out and delivery only effective 8 PM tonight

Movie theaters, gyms and casinos will temporarily close effective 8 PM tonight

Uniform approach to social distancing will slow spread of COVID-19 throughout the tri-state area

PRESS RELEASE FROM GOV. MURPHY’S OFFICE: TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)—Amid a lack of federal direction and nationwide standards, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, and Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont today announced a regional approach to combatting the novel coronavirus – or COVID-19 – throughout the tri-state area.

These uniform standards will limit crowd capacity for social and recreational gatherings to 50 people, effective 8 PM tonight. This follows updated guidance that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued yesterday recommending the cancellation or postponement of in-person events consisting of 50 people or more.

The three governors also announced restaurants and bars will close for on premise service and move to take-out and delivery services only. These establishments will be provided a waiver for carry-out alcohol. These measures will take effect at 8 PM tonight.

Finally, the three governors said they will temporarily close movie theaters, gyms and casinos, effective at 8 PM tonight. 

This uniform approach to social distancing is meant to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19. 

Governor Murphy said, “With all we are seeing in our state – and across our nation and around the world – the time for us to take our strongest, and most direct, actions to date to slow the spread of coronavirus is now. I’ve said many times over the past several days that, in our state, we are going to get through this as one New Jersey family. But if we’re all in this together, we must work with our neighboring states to act together. The work against coronavirus isn’t just up to some of us, it’s up to all of us.”

“Our primary goal right now is to slow the spread of this virus so that the wave of new infections doesn’t crash our healthcare system, and everyone agrees social distancing is the best way to do that,” Governor Cuomo said. “This is not a war that can be won alone, which is why New York is partnering with our neighboring states to implement a uniform standard that not only keeps our people safe but also prevents ‘state shopping’ where residents of one state travel to another and vice versa. I have called on the federal government to implement nationwide protocols but in their absence we are taking this on ourselves.”

Governor Lamont said, “The only way to effectively fight the spread of COVID-19 is by working together as states. We have shared interests, and a patchwork of closures and restrictions is not the best way forward. I know that because of this collaboration, we will save lives.” 

Governor Murphy Reports 2nd NJ Death From COVID-19

March 14, 2020

FREEHOLD, NJ (MONMOUTH)–Governor Phil Murphy a few moments ago reported NJ’s second death from COVID-19. The individual was a female in her 50s and was being treated at CentraState Medical Center in Freehold Township.

Messages From Monmouth County And Millstone Township On COVID-19

March 13, 2020

FREEHOLD AND MILLSTONE TOWNSHIP, NJ (MONMOUTH)–Due to the cancellation of group activities on the local, state and national levels, all Millstone Township recreational programs, both travel and non-travel, adult and youth programs,  have been suspended through Sunday, April 5th 2020.  This includes games, practices and events.  Further evaluation will be made in early April regarding lifting or extending this suspension. 

Video from Millstone Township Mayor and Deputy Mayor Regarding COVID-19

Monmouth County takes action in response to COVID-19

Beginning Saturday, March 14, no public access to County buildings

FREEHOLD, NJ –The Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders and County officials are
taking action out of an abundance of caution to protect and keep residents safe from the
spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19).
“Our number one priority is the safety of our residents and so, at this time, we have decided to
take immediate actions to prevent the COVID-19 in Monmouth County libraries, parks and
public buildings,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone. “In attempt to curb the spread of
COVID-19, Monmouth County will be suspending all public building access and programs
beginning tomorrow.”
“We want to remind residents to remain calm and make sure you have the most accurate and
up to date information, which you can get from the Centers of Disease Control or the New
Jersey Department of Health. Please help us spread facts, not fear,” added Freeholder Director
Arnone.
Beginning Saturday, March 14, and through Sunday, March 22, all Monmouth County Library
branches and the Monmouth County Park System buildings will be closed to the public. County
golf courses and park spaces will remain open.
Beginning Monday, March 16, public access will be restricted from all buildings with the
exception of the Monmouth County Division of Social Services (MCDSS). For MCDSS,
protections will be put into place to ensure that there is no physical contact between
Monmouth County employees and the residents seeking services.
All Monmouth County employees will report to work and be available to residents by phone
and by email.
“We understand that the COVID-19 situation is unsettling for some and want to arm our
residents with the information they need,” said Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley,
liaison to the Monmouth County Department of Health and Human Services. “There is a
Monmouth County Health Department’s phone bank will open Monday at 9 a.m. for residents
who have any questions and concerns about COVID-19, or need to talk to someone about how
this situation is affecting them.”
Crisis Counselors from the Monmouth County Division of Behavioral Health are available
through the phone banks to help residents who may be experiencing stress or anxiety due to
the evolving situation. The counselors will provide County residents with guidance to help
them through this challenging time.
The Monmouth County Health Department phone bank will open Monday, March 16 at 9 a.m.
and can be reached at 732-845-2070.

County officials monitoring Coronavirus situation in
Monmouth County

FREEHOLD, NJ –With four presumptive positive cases of Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Monmouth
County, County officials are assuring residents that they are monitoring the situation and taking action
to ensure the public health and safety of Monmouth County residents.
Two of the presumptive positive cases include a 66 year old female from Hazlet and an 83 year old
female from Hazlet who are both being treated at Hackensack Meridian Health Bayshore Medical
Center. The Golden Age Adult Day Care Program, where both of these individuals were clients, has
voluntarily closed and is working in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Health and the
Monmouth County Health Department.
The two other cases include a 27 year old male from Little Silver who recently attended the Biogen
conference in Boston and a 17 year old female from Little Silver who is an immediate family member
of the 27 year old male.
“We continue to assure you that the freeholder board is actively engaged and in constant contact with
the local mayors and the New Jersey Legislative Delegation as well as the New Jersey Governor’s
Office and the New Jersey Department of Health,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone. “We
are committed to ensuring that the County has the necessary resources to respond and mitigate this
evolving situation.”
“All Monmouth County and municipal health officials are following guidelines set forth by the Centers
of Disease Control (CDC) the Governor’s State of Emergency Declaration and the New Jersey
Department of Health (NJDOH) for response to COVID-19 cases,” added Freeholder Director
Arnone.
All Monmouth County and municipal health officials are following the guidelines set forth by the CDC
and the NJDOH for monitoring and response to COVID-19 cases.
The best defense against the Coronavirus is to practice safe respiratory hygiene and take steps to
prevent the spread of germs including washing hands, covering coughs and sneezes, and staying home
when sick. However, residents should be aware that as investigations into these four cases continue,
additional cases may be identified.
“Again we would like to reiterate that it is important to have factual, up to date information about the
coronavirus,” said Freeholder Deputy Director Kiley. “If you have questions, go directly to the CDC,
the New Jersey Department of Health or the Monmouth County Health Department.”
There have been social media reports of individuals going door to door claiming to be from the CDC.
The CDC is not deploying teams of people to go door to door and conduct surveillance, so people
should not let these individuals in their homes or speak with them.
The CDC has a “share the facts, stop fear” page which is quite useful in determining what is fact vs.
fiction with regard to the coronavirus. It can be accessed at cdc.gov/coronavirus.
Timely and accurate information can also be found at http://www.nj.gov/health and anyone with questions
can call the NJDOH COVID-19 24-Hour Public Hotline 1-800-222-1222 or email to ncov@dohnj.gov.
Links to the CDC and New Jersey Department of Health are currently posted to the Monmouth County
Health Department webpage, http://www.visitmonmouth.com/health.

Census 2020 Survey Is Arriving By Mail

March 13, 2020

By: Dennis Symons, Jr.

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)—The 2020 Census count is underway and I received my invitation by mail today. As per the instructions I logged onto My2020census.gov and entered my code Census ID Code. There were some very basic questions of who was living in the home and birthdays. It was one of the easiest census forms I have ever completed and took less than two minutes to complete from start to finish, even though it says it could take an average of 10 minutes to complete.

The Census is counted every 10 years and many things from voting districts, financial aid, Federal, State and Local government services and more use this government data. A response is required by law and should be very easy to complete if you have received the invitation from United States Census Bureau.

Frequently asked questions of the Census Bureau:

  1. What is the 2020 Census?The goal of the census is to count every person living in the United States, once, only once and in the right place. Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution mandates that this population and housing count occur every 10 years. Census data guide how more than $675 billion of federal funding is distributed to states and communities each year.
  2. Am I required to respond to the 2020 Census?Yes, you are required by law to respond to the 2020 Census (Title 13, U.S. Code, Sections 141 and 193). We are conducting the 2020 Census under the authority of Title 13, U.S. Code, Sections 141, 193 and 221. This collection of information has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The eight-digit OMB approval number is 0607-1006. If this number were not displayed, we could not conduct the census.
  3. Are my answers confidential and private?Yes. The Census Bureau is required by law to protect your information. The Census Bureau is not permitted to publicly release your responses in a way that could identify you or your household. Per the Federal Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2015, your data are protected from cybersecurity risks through screening of the systems that transmit your data. All web data submissions are encrypted in order to protect your privacy.Title 13 of the U.S. Code protects the confidentiality of all your information. Violating the confidentiality of a respondent is a federal crime with serious penalties, including a federal prison sentence of up to five years, a fine of up to $250,000, or both. Only authorized individuals have access to the stored data, and the information you provide to the Census Bureau may only be used by a restricted number of authorized individuals who are sworn for life to protect the confidentiality of your individual responses. Your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.For more information about how we protect your information, please visit our website at census.gov and click on “Data Protection and Privacy Policy” at the bottom of the home page. This page also includes information about the collection, storage, and use of these records. Click on “System of Records Notices (SORN)” and look for Privacy Act System of Records Notice COMMERCE/CENSUS-5, Decennial Census Program.
  4. Who should complete the 2020 Census questionnaire?This 2020 Census questionnaire should be completed by the person who owns or rents the living quarters or any other person who is at least 15 years of age with knowledge of the household.
  5. How do I change my answers?For questions where you must choose a single response from a list, clicking another response will change your answer to that response.If it is a “select all that apply” question, you may click on a selected check box to unselect the box and remove it as one of your answers.
  6. How long will the 2020 Census questionnaire take?The Census Bureau estimates that completing the questionnaire will take 10 minutes on average.
  7. How will the Census Bureau use the information I provide?By law, the Census Bureau can only use your responses to produce statistics.
  8. Is it safe to complete the 2020 Census questionnaire online?Yes. For each online questionnaire, we are required to provide an explanation to respondents about the confidentiality of the data and the laws that protect those data (e.g., Title 13, U.S. Code Section 9 (a)).Per the Federal Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2015, your data are protected from cybersecurity risks through screening of the systems that transmit your data. All web data submissions are encrypted in order to protect your privacy, even in the remote chance that your responses are intercepted.More information on this topic can be found on the Data Protection and Privacy Policy webpage (http://www.census.gov/privacy/).
  9. Will the results be published?Yes. By law, the Census Bureau can only use your responses to produce statistics. The Census Bureau is not permitted to publicly release your responses in a way that could identify you or your household. The Census Bureau plans to make results of this study available to the general public. Results will be presented in aggregate form and no personally identifiable information will be published.Information quality is an integral part of the pre-dissemination review of the information disseminated by the Census Bureau (fully described in the Census Bureau’s Information Quality Guidelines at https://www.census.gov/about/policies/quality/guidelines.html). Information quality is also integral to the information collection conducted by the Census Bureau and is incorporated into the clearance process by the Paperwork Reduction Act.
  10. Do I have to complete the 2020 Census questionnaire for my household members?Yes, you will be asked to provide information for each household member.

2020 NJ-4th District Congressional Art Competition Open to High School Students

March 3, 2020

HAMILTON, N.J. (MERCER)– It’s not too late for high school students to sign up for the national 2020 Annual Congressional Art Competition hosted locally by Congressman Chris Smith (NJ-04) for Mercer, Monmouth and Ocean students who live in the Fourth Congressional District he represents.

   The deadline for entry is March 13 for current high school student artwork recently completed, or works specifically created just for the competition, that meet the originality, suitability, size and other entry guidelines of the national competition. Click here for 2020 rules of entry, entry forms, a list of towns in the Fourth District and other important information.

   “Every year the artwork submitted by the students is impressive,” Smith said. “It is encouraging and inspiring to see such a high level of artistry being pursued by our students and fostered by art teachers in the Fourth Congressional District. Three professional judges, whose artwork will also be on display, will pick the winners.”

   The artwork entered into the competition this year will be displayed and open to the public at the Lake Front Gallery of Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital at Hamilton (RWJ-Hamilton) from March 31, 2020 through May 1, with winners announced at the end of the show. Last year the nearly 70 entries represented a variety of styles and mediums.

  The judges are dedicated, experienced local artists who have roots in the community.

Every year the Congressional Institute sponsors this national high school visual art competition to recognize and foster artistic talent in each congressional district. Since the competition began in 1982, more than 650,000 high school students have participated. Participation in the contest is at the discretion of each Member office.

    Students who place will receive ribbons and all participants are presented with congressional certificates.

Student artwork will on be display during normal hospital visiting hours at the RWJ-Hamilton Lakefront Art Gallery located in the Tower on the first floor mezzanine, directly above the café and gift shop area. RWJ-Hamilton is located at One Hamilton Health Place, Hamilton, NJ, Mercer County.

   To enter a piece of artwork or for more information, call Smith’s Constituent Service Center at (609) 585-7878.

   Information about the 2020 NJ-04 show or to view the 2019 and prior year winners visit Congressman Smith’s Congressional Art Competition web page.

Municipalities in New Jersey’s 4th Congressional District 2013-2022
Allentown Manasquan Bay Head
Avon-By-The-Sea Middletown (part)* Jackson
Belmar Millstone Lakehurst
Bradley Beach Neptune City Lakewood
Brielle Neptune Township Manchester
Colts Neck Ocean Township Plumsted
Eatontown Red Bank Point Pleasant Borough (part) *
Englishtown Roosevelt Point Pleasant Beach
Fair Haven Rumson
Farmingdale Sea Girt
Freehold Borough Shrewsbury Borough
Freehold Township Shrewsbury Township
Holmdel Spring Lake
Howell Spring Lake Heights Mercer County
Lake Como Tinton Falls Hamilton
Little Silver Upper Freehold Robbinsville
Manalapan Wall

  • Point Pleasant Borough and Middletown are split between Congressional Districts. If students live in
    either of these towns and are unsure of their District, please call 609-585-7878 and provide the
    student’s complete home address. The staff will be able to research in which District the student lives.

Allentown FFA Wreath Laying Ceremony For First FFA President

February 23, 2020

MANALAPAN, NJ (MONMOUTH)–The Allentown FFA held a wreath laying ceremony for the first FFA National President from Freehold, NJ today the 2nd day of FFA Week. This has been a tradition tracked back in Allentown FFA scrap books as far as 1975.

Applegate was elected first FFA president in 1928 (Called New Farmers of America in 1928) First National FFA Convention is held in Kansas City, Mo.: 33 delegates from 18 states (Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin) are in attendance.

More on NJ’s FFA History here at the NJ Department of Agriculture website.

Leslie N. Applegate was born on October 20, 1911 and died in December 1971. Anyone wishing to visit Applegate is buried in Old Tennent Cemetery 454 Tennent Rd, Manalapan, Section C, Lot 16, Grave 279

Softball Coach Charged With Stealing Team Money

February 12, 2020

FREEHOLD – A Neptune Township man who coached a competitive youth softball team is facing charges of theft after he misused about $14,000 of the team’s funds earmarked for traveling expenses and tournament costs, announced Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

Michael Lane, 54, of Neptune Township, was charged Monday with third degree Theft by Unlawful Taking and third degree Misapplication of Entrusted Property by detectives from the Tinton Falls Police Department with assistance from the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office.

Lane, in his capacity as the coach for the Monmouth Surf softball team (a youth sports travel team) since 2013, received money from players to cover traveling expenses and tournament costs. But last July 2019, parents for the players were informed by Lane he misused the funds given to him for personal use and the money was no longer available. He then informed parents he would pay back the funds but the player’s participation would have to be cancelled. When money was not paid back, parents reported the crime to law enforcement and an investigation by the Tinton Falls Police Department, with assistance from the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office, revealed the defendant did not utilize the funds for the softball team and instead deposited approximately $14,000 of the stolen money into his personal account.


If convicted of the third degree crimes, Lane faces up to five years in a New Jersey state prison on each count.The case is assigned to Monmouth County Assistant Prosecutor Diane Aifer. Lane is represented by Jacqueline E. Cistaro, Esq. of New York.


Despite these charges, every defendant is presumed innocent, unless and until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, following a trial at which the defendant has all of the trial rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and State law.

Monmouth County contributes to State Shared Services Agreements milestone 1,000 shared services agreements reached in 2019 throughout New Jersey

FREEHOLD, NJ – The Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders was recently notified by the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs that the State reached the major milestone of 1,000 shared services agreements achieved since the beginning of 2019, 214 of these agreements stemming from Monmouth County.

“Since its creation in 2011, shared services in Monmouth County have generated more than $40 million,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, liaison to the Office of Shared Services. “Two of the County’s largest shared services agreements that I am most proud of include the 9-1-1 Communications Center, which I commend Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden for running the best 9-1-1 Communications Center in the State, and the agreement with Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Earle.”

The Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office 9-1-1 Communications Center serves as a hub for County-wide emergency services, generating a revenue of $4,360,766.38 in 2019. This agency handled communications and dispatching for 46 municipalities, 26 police departments, 43 fire districts as well as 38 EMS and rescue squads.

In 2018, the County entered into a shared services agreement with NWS Earle, which includes traffic signal maintenance, unimproved road maintenance, snow and ice control and storm drainage repairs among other services. This was the first shared services agreement in the State between County government and the U.S. Navy.

“All 53 municipalities share some type of service with the County and I cannot thank County Department and Division Heads enough for dedicating the time and energy to expanding shared services,” said Freeholder Director Arnone. “Whether it is municipal police departments, fire departments, first aid squads, authorities, commissions, public school or institutions of higher learning, all shared services have been positively impacting municipal budgets while delivering quality services to residents. “

“The County’s Office of Shared Services has truly paved the way for other counties to streamline the process, create greater cost savings for taxpayers and offer new revenue opportunities,” said Freeholder Director Arnone. “Throughout 2020, I plan to continue promoting shared services by meeting with municipal committees and elected officials with Monmouth County’s full-time Shared Services Coordinator, Liz Perez, to explain how shared service agreements benefit the taxpayer.”

For more information about Monmouth County Shared Services, call 732-431-7460, ext. 2115 or go to www.visitmonmouth.com.

Jackson Trio Indicted In Manalapan Shooting Death 2 Men, Woman Facing Charges Related to October Shooting in Manalapan

Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office

FREEHOLD – Two men and a woman, all from Ocean County, were indicted Tuesday morning for their respective roles in the October shooting death of a Manalapan man, announced Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

Zoey S. Monte, 20, of Jackson, was arrested after she turned herself into authorities at the Manalapan Township Police Department yesterday. Monte was indicted on one count of second degree Burglary, one count of second degree Conspiracy to Commit Burglary, one count of second degree Unlawful Possession of a Handgun, one count of second degree Possession of a Firearm for an Unlawful Purpose, one count of fourth degree Unlawful Possession of a Weapon, and one count of third degree Possession of a Weapon for an Unlawful Purpose.

Tyler J. Martucci, 22, also of Jackson is currently be held in the Ocean County Jail in Toms River on separate, unrelated charges. Martucci was indicted on one count of second degree Burglary, one count of second degree Conspiracy to Commit Burglary, one count of second degree Unlawful Possession of a Handgun, one count of second degree Possession of a Firearm for an Unlawful Purpose, one count of fourth degree Unlawful Possession of a Weapon, and one count of third degree Possession of a Weapon for an Unlawful Purpose.

In October, Gerard A. Grimes Jr., 23, of Jackson, was arrested in connection with the shooting death of Narciso Rodriguez-Corona, 43, of Manalapan.  Tuesday, Grimes was indicted on one count of first degree Murder, one count of first degree Felony Murder, two counts of second degree Possession of a Firearm for an Unlawful Purpose, two counts of second degree Unlawful Possession of a Handgun, one count of second degree Burglary, one count of second degree Conspiracy to Commit Burglary, two counts of fourth degree Aggravated Assault, one count of second degree Eluding, one count of fourth degree Resisting Arrest, and one count of fourth degree Tampering with Physical Evidence. 

On Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 9:34 p.m., Manalapan police officers responded to a call, reporting a fight at 25 Fawn Run in the township. Several minutes later, police received another call for a confirmed shooting victim. Manalapan police officers arrived on scene and discovered RodriguezCorona suffering from a gunshot wound.  Mr. Rodriguez-Corona was transported to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, where he was pronounced deceased.   The investigation revealed Grimes, Monte and Martucci all came to the Manalapan residence armed with a handgun.  Grimes attempted to enter the residence while Monte and Martucci remained outside.  Residents of the home were alerted to Grimes’ presence and attempted to stop him from entering, resulting in a brief confrontation outside the home.  Shortly thereafter, a second encounter occurred nearby, where Grimes ultimately shot the victim.  Grimes, Monte and Martucci all fled the area

Police were quickly dispatched to the area and encountered the victim, who was suffering from lifethreatening injuries.  After receiving initial information regarding the incident, police began to search the area.  A few hours later, police attempted a motor vehicle stop of Grimes’ vehicle, but he failed to stop.  Thereafter, Grimes fled the vehicle.  Monte and Martucci were also onboard the vehicle and were arrested at that time.  A short time later, Grimes was in the backyard of a neighborhood residence.   

If convicted of Murder, Grimes faces a minimum sentence of thirty (30) years in New Jersey state prison without the possibility of parole, and a maximum sentence of Life imprisonment subject to the provisions of the “No Early Release Act” (NERA), requiring him to serve 85 percent of his imposed sentence before becoming eligible for release on parole.  Grimes would also be under parole supervision for five years following his prospective release from state prison.

If convicted of any of the second degree crimes, Grimes, Monte and Martucci each face up to 10 years in a New Jersey state prison on each count.  Any sentence resulting from a conviction for the second degree crime of Burglary is also subject to the provisions of NERA. Grimes, Monte and Martucci would also be under parole supervision for five years following their respective release from state prison. 

Grimes, Monte and Martucci are each being held in the Monmouth County Correctional Institution (MCCI) in Freehold Township. Grimes has been detained pending trial since his arrest on Oct. 5, 2019. Detention hearings for Monte and Martucci are schedule for Feb. 3, 2020 at 9:00 a.m. before Monmouth County Superior Court Judge Paul X. Escandon.

The case is assigned to Monmouth County Assistant Prosecutors Joseph Lanzot and Lawrence Nelson. 

Despite these charges, every defendant is presumed innocent, unless and until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, following a trial at which the defendant has all of the trial rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and State law.