Category: Rumson

11 More Victims In $560k Jewelry Theft

October 17, 2020


Read related MidJersey.News story here: Rumson Businessman Charged With Theft, Anthony Goltsch, of Manchester Township in Ocean County, and the owner of the Golden Goose jewelry store located at 7 West River Road in Rumson, was charged today with second degree Theft By Failure To Make Required Disposition of Property Received.


RUMSON, NJ (MONMOUTH)–The owner of a Rumson jewelry store charged with theft in September is now facing additional charges after 11 new victims came forward to report being victimized. The new victims revealed the jeweler failed to return jewelry totaling about $300,000 that was left at his store on consignment, for redesign, or for repair, announced Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

Anthony Goltsch, of Manchester Township in Ocean County, and the owner of the Golden Goose jewelry store located at 7 West River Road in Rumson, was charged Tuesday with another count of second degree Theft by Failure to Make Required Disposition of Property Received. Goltsch is now charged with the theft of jewelry valued at approximately $560,000.

Victim 1 consigned a ring with an appraised value of $45,000 to Goltsch in April 2019. Victim has not received any payment for the ring and has attempted to get the ring back on numerous occasions, but Goltsch has not returned or paid the victim for the ring.

Victim 2 gave Goltsch a large quantity of sterling silver jewelry to melt in November 2015. The jewelry has an estimated value between $5,000 and $10,000, but the victim has to-date not received payment from Goltsch.

Victim 3 consigned a watch with an estimated value of $1,800 in July 2019. Victim has not received any payment for the watch and has attempted to get the watch back on numerous occasions, but Goltsch has not returned or paid for the watch.

Victim 4 paid Goltsch a deposit of $6,900 for a ring in June 2020. Goltsch did not deliver the ring but the victim was able to reverse the charge on his credit card.

Victim 5 paid Goltsch $34,500 for a watch between March and June 2018. The watch was never delivered by Goltsch, and he has refused to refund the money.

Victim 6 paid Goltsch a total of $98,704 between November 2019 and February 2020 for both gold and silver coins. The victim has not received the coins despite numerous follow-ups with Goltsch.

Victim 7, who is a jewelry dealer, provided diamonds on at least eight occasions to Goltsch to sell between April 2018 and June 2019.  Despite numerous requests for payment or a return of the diamonds, Goltsch failed to pay or make a return.  The total amount of the theft for this victim is $98,500.

Victim 8 in March 2019, victim handed over earrings to Goltsch for repairs. Despite multiple requests made to Goltsch, he has refused to return the items valued between $700 and $1,000.

Victim 9 turned over to Goltsch in June 2019, assorted gold jewelry for melting. To-date, the victim has not received payment for the assorted gold jewelry valued at approximately $3,500.

Victim 10 gave Goltsch assorted jewelry valued at approximately $10,000 on consignment in September 2019. The victim followed up with Goltsch but to-date has not received payment for the assorted jewelry, and he has refused to return the jewelry.

Victim 11 left her watch with Goltsch for repair in April 2019. The victim was charged $535 for the repair in August 2019. The victim has followed up numerous times, but has not received back from Goltsch the watch, valued at approximately $5,000.

A joint investigation by the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office and Rumson Police Department initially uncovered three victims who have failed to receive any payment from Goltsch or a return of the items involved. After the initial charge of second degree Theft By Failure To Make Required Disposition of Property Received against Goltsch was reported the 11 new victims stepped forward to detail how they had fallen victim to his crimes. Fourteen victims have been identified and more victims could be forthcoming.

If anyone has information regarding the Golden Goose, please contact Detective Michael Acquaviva of the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office, Financial Crimes Unit at 732-431-7160, ext 2233, or Rumson Police Detective Donald Schneider at 732-842-0500.

If convicted of the Theft charge, Goltsch faces a sentence of five to ten years in a New Jersey state prison on each count. 

The case is assigned to Monmouth County Assistant Prosecutor Lawrence Nelsen.

Despite these charges, every defendant is presumed innocent, unless and until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, following a trial at which the defendant has all of the trial rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and State law.

Monmouth County Voting Information And Video Tutorial

October 8, 2020

Visit: https://www.monmouthcountyvotes.com/ for the latest voting information in Monmouth County

FREEHOLD, NJ (MONMOUTH)–As you may be aware, this year’s November General Election in New Jersey is being conducted primarily by mail-in ballots, per State mandate. On November 3, 2020, Election Day, limited polling locations will be open for voting on paper provisional ballots only, except for disabled voters. 

Voters across Monmouth County are receiving their mail-in ballots this week and are encouraged to contact the County Clerk’s Election Office at 732-431-7790, Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with any questions about the delivery of their ballots. 

Due to this unprecedented change in our election process, Monmouth County Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon has provided a comprehensive webpage on MonmouthCountyVotes.com, explaining this year’s election process.

In addition, our office has provided video tutorials, including an animated step-by-step video informing Monmouth County voters of how to properly complete and return their mail-in ballots. The tutorial also explains how the paper ballots are reviewed and verified by the Monmouth County Board of Elections.

The video can be viewed on our Facebook and YouTube pages. We encourage you to share this important information with your friends and neighbors.







Election Hotline Established to Secure Election Integrity

To help ensure free and fair elections in Monmouth County, the County Election Offices and Prosecutor’s Office have established an election hotline. To report any issues of voter fraud or misconduct in Monmouth County, residents can call the County Prosecutor’s Office hotline at 855-786-5878.

“Our democratic system of government depends on free and fair elections and, as such, election integrity and security is important to all of us,” said County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni and County Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon. “For these reasons, our offices are working together to further safeguard the electoral process.”


Upcoming Dates and Voter Deadlines

  • Monday, October 12th: All County Offices closed in observance of Columbus Day
  • Tuesday, October 13th: Voter Registration Deadline for the November General Election
  • Friday, October 30th: Application Deadline for General Election Mail-In Ballots by Electronic Means for Qualified Overseas Civilian and Military Voters 
  • Tuesday, November 3rd: General Election Day!
  • Tuesday, November 3rd at 8 p.m.: Close of the polls; Deadline to deliver mail-in ballot by U.S. Postal Service mail, Drop Box, or in-person to the County Board of Elections at 300 Halls Mill Road in Freehold or at assigned Polling Place.

Monmouth County Secure Ballot Dropbox Locations:

LocationAddressEntry
1Aberdeen Municipal Building1 Aberdeen Square
Aberdeen, NJ 07747
2Allentown Borough Hall8 North Main Street
Allentown, NJ 08501
3Asbury Park City Hall1 Municipal Plaza
Asbury Park, NJ 07712
City Council Chambers (Bangs Avenue Entrance)
4Borough of Belmar Municipal Building601 Main Street
Belmar, NJ 07719
5Eatontown Borough Municipal Building47 Broad Street
Eatontown, NJ 07724
Rear Entrance
6Board of Elections Office300 Halls Mill Road
Freehold, NJ 07728
Side Entrance
7Hazlet Agency – NJ Motor Vehicle Commission1374 Highway 36
Hazlet, NJ 07730
Airport Plaza
8Howell Township Municipal Building4567 Route 9 North
Howell, NJ 07731
Rear Entrance
9Long Branch City Hall344 Broadway
Long Branch, NJ 07740
10Manalapan Township Municipal Building120 County Road 522
Manalapan, NJ 07726
11Middletown Municipal Building1 Kings Highway
Middletown Township, NJ 07748
12Croydon Hall900 Leonardville Road
Leonardo, NJ 07737
13Neptune Township Municipal Building25 Neptune Boulevard
Neptune, NJ 07753
Library Entrance
14Ocean Township Town Hall399 Monmouth Road
Oakhurst, NJ 07755
15Red Bank Borough Municipal Building90 Monmouth Street
Red Bank, NJ 07701
16Rumson Borough Hall80 East River Road
Rumson, NJ 07760
17Wall Township Municipal Building2700 Allaire Road
Wall, NJ 07719

Vote-By-Mail Drop Box Arrives In Allentown

September 22, 2020

ALLENTOWN, NJ (MONMOUTH)–An Allentown resident told MidJersey.News that around 11 pm last night a delivery crew installed a Vote-By-Mail Drop Box in front of Allentown at Borough Hall on Main Street. There are currently 17 Vote-By-Mail Drop Box locations for Monmouth County, this is the furthest west serving Western Monmouth County.

A current list of Vote-By-Mail Drop Box locations for Monmouth County can be found here.

Vote-By-Mail Drop Box Locations

Pursuant to State law, the November 3, 2020 General Election will be conducted primarily by Mail-In Ballot in New Jersey.

If you wish to place your Mail-In Ballot in a secure drop box, below are the locations throughout the County which will be available starting the week of September 15. Addresses in the list below are clickable and will bring up Google Maps.

Voters can drop their voted Mail-In Ballot into these Board of Elections Drop Boxes anywhere in the County up until 8 p.m. on November 3, 2020. You do not have to be a resident of the town where the drop box is located. Be advised that these drop boxes are under video surveillance and are monitored by the Monmouth County Board of Elections, which can be reached at 732-431-7802.

For more information about the General Election process, click here.

LocationAddressEntry
1Aberdeen Municipal Building1 Aberdeen Square
Aberdeen, NJ 07747
2Allentown Borough Hall8 North Main Street
Allentown, NJ 08501
3Asbury Park City Hall1 Municipal Plaza
Asbury Park, NJ 07712
City Council Chambers (Bangs Avenue Entrance)
4Borough of Belmar Municipal Building601 Main Street
Belmar, NJ 07719
5Eatontown Borough Municipal Building47 Broad Street
Eatontown, NJ 07724
Rear Entrance
6Board of Elections Office300 Halls Mill Road
Freehold, NJ 07728
Side Entrance
7Hazlet Agency – NJ Motor Vehicle Commission1374 Highway 36
Hazlet, NJ 07730
Airport Plaza
8Howell Township Municipal Building4567 Route 9 North
Howell, NJ 07731
Rear Entrance
9Long Branch City Hall344 Broadway
Long Branch, NJ 07740
10Manalapan Township Municipal Building120 County Road 522
Manalapan, NJ 07726
11Middletown Municipal Building1 Kings Highway
Middletown Township, NJ 07748
12Croydon Hall900 Leonardville Road
Leonardo, NJ 07737
13Neptune Township Municipal Building25 Neptune Boulevard
Neptune, NJ 07753
Library Entrance
14Ocean Township Town Hall399 Monmouth Road
Oakhurst, NJ 07755
15Red Bank Borough Municipal Building90 Monmouth Street
Red Bank, NJ 07701
16Rumson Borough Hall80 East River Road
Rumson, NJ 07760
17Wall Township Municipal Building2700 Allaire Road
Wall, NJ 07719

Rumson Businessman Charged With Theft

Anthony Goltsch, of Manchester Township in Ocean County, and the owner of the Golden Goose jewelry store located at 7 West River Road in Rumson, was charged today with second degree Theft By Failure To Make Required Disposition of Property Received.

September 3, 2020


Read MidJersey.News update here: 11 More Victims In $560k Jewelry Theft


FREEHOLD, NJ (MONMOUTH)–The owner of a Rumson jewelry store was charged with theft today after failing to return jewelry totaling over $260,000 that was left at his store on consignment or for redesign, announced Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.

Anthony Goltsch, of Manchester Township in Ocean County, and the owner of the Golden Goose jewelry store located at 7 West River Road in Rumson, was charged today with second degree Theft By Failure To Make Required Disposition of Property Received.

Over the last several months, The Rumson Police Department received complaints from three customers of the store who reported that they had left pieces of jewelry for either consignment or redesign at the Golden Goose, and Goltsch has failed to pay them any cash proceeds or return the jewelry despite numerous requests by the customers.

A joint investigation by the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office and Rumson Police Department uncovered three victims who have failed to receive any payment from Goltsch or a return of the items involved in the theft.

The first victim reported that between July and August 2017, she consigned two rings for sale at the Golden Goose with a combined appraisal value of over $180,000.  To-date she has not received payment for the rings from Goltsch, and he has failed to return the rings, despite the victim’s numerous requests.

The second victim reported that she consigned eight pieces of jewelry to the Golden Goose in March 2019, with a combined appraisal value of approximately $59,000.  She has not received payment for the jewelry from Goltsch despite numerous requests made and he has failed to return any of the pieces.

The third victim reported that in June 2019, she brought three pieces of jewelry to the Golden Goose to be redesigned.  The jewelry had an appraised value of approximately $24,000.  As with the other victims, despite numerous requests for the jewelry to be returned, Goltsch has refused to do so. 

If anyone has information regarding the Golden Goose, please contact Detective Michael Acquaviva of the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office, Financial Crimes Unit at 732-431-7160, ext 2233, or Rumson Police Detective Donald Schneider at 732-842-0500.

If convicted of the Theft charge, Goltsch faces a sentence of five to ten years in a New Jersey state prison. 

The case is assigned to Monmouth County Assistant Prosecutor Lawrence Nelsen.

Despite these charges, every defendant is presumed innocent, unless and until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, following a trial at which the defendant has all of the trial rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and State law.

Half A Century Later, Hero Medic Finally Presented Long-promised Silver Star

July 18, 2020

FREEHOLD, NJ (MONMOUTH)–Today U.S Rep. Chris Smith (NJ-04) presented the Silver Star to Vietnam War combat Army medic and Monmouth County resident, Bart Fabian.

    This is the second Silver Star awarded to “Doc” Fabian, a highly decorated veteran who received his first Silver Star for his heroism during an ambush by the North Vietnamese on January 11, 1969. He has previously been awarded two Bronze Stars, two Purple Hearts, and an Army Commendation Medal (ACM) with Valor.

    “Bart ‘Doc’ Fabian is a hero for all ages, earning the Silver Star not once, but twice. He routinely went above and beyond the call, protecting injured soldiers who were under attack,” Smith said. “Mr. Fabian’s actions on April 13, 1969, which account for the second Silver Star, are truly courageous, heroic and the mark of a natural leader.

Smith added, “How does a man under gunfire find that kind of grit to do something absolutely astonishing? We are talking about a man who put his own life at risk—repeatedly—to defend injured soldiers who were being targeted by the enemy. The record shows that Doc Fabian saved 10 U.S. soldiers, and stopped two soldiers who were trying to kill wounded GIs. In an era when people admire fictional superheroes and Hollywood stars portraying heroes, Doc Fabian is a genuine uncontested hero.”

    After over two years of Smith working with the Army, the Secretary of the Army Ryan D. McCarthy ordered Fabian be recognized “For gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States” while serving in his outfit, Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Calvary Regiment, II Field Force Vietnam.

   Recounting that fateful April day, Mr. Fabian said the battle raged on for an hour and a half. He lost six from his troop, including one of his closest buddies, and 19 in total, including the other medic. “We got beat up pretty bad that day,” Mr. Fabian said. “It was a bad day for the good guys.”

   The day after the battle, his commander said he would be recommended for the Silver Star. But it never came. “I decided to forget about it,” he said. “I didn’t want to promote myself. It was a bad day. The next day we were right back in it.” That changed in 2018 at a reunion with fellow veterans who urged him to seek the medal.

   A family member contacted Smith and asked him to help look into the matter. Smith helped coordinate eyewitness statements from Sgt. John J. Sorich III, Sgt. Joseph L. Coopet Jr. and Lt. Col. Richard A. Belcher.

   The Silver Star is awarded to a person who, while serving in the U.S. Army, is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force. The required gallantry must have been performed with marked distinction.

   Members of the awards board unanimously recommended approval, some making handwritten notations of Mr. Fabian’s actions.

   Wrote Lt. Gen. John W. Woodmansee Jr., who also saw combat in Vietnam, “‘Doc’ Fabian joins the illustrious list of medics who risk their lives saving others. …The award of the Silver Star is certainly deserved. …On 13 April 1969 he saved numerous lives in the middle of a battle… an incredible display of courage and competence. When we sing the National Anthem, we are singing about those ‘Doc’ Fabians in our ranks.”

 Brig. Gen John W. Nicholson (RET) said, “He treated more than 10 wounded soldiers and recovered them and their KIA buddies. He voluntarily performed these heroic and life-saving actions while 19 fellow U.S. soldiers were killed in the same action. …His bravery was fearless, determined and voluntary, despite desperate odds… I highly recommend approval of this award.”

   Lt. Gen. Thomas Griffin determined that Mr. Fabian’s “action on 13 April 1969 absolutely meet the standard for this award… His repeated exposure to enemy fire while rescuing his fellow soldiers—and engaging the enemy—over a long period of time—are well above the call of duty. I wholeheartedly recommended approval!”

   Said Maj. Gen. Leroy Newton Suddath Jr. (RET), “This is the best documentation I have ever seen.”

Another medal in ‘Doc’ Fabian’s future?

   “Perhaps we are not finished honoring the life and heroic acts of Doc Fabian,” Smith said, noting several of the general officers who reviewed and approved the Silver Star for the 13 April 1969 action, felt he might be entitled to an even higher medal. “Two of the general officers suggested he might be deserving of the Distinguished Service Cross. Without a doubt, his actions were extraordinary heroism.”


Burlington County Man Missing In Navesink River – Search Called Off Due To Weather

June 6, 2020

RUMSON, NJ (MONMOUTH)–A search for a 61 year old man from Burlington County has been called off when storms moved in after a kayack flipped over in the Navesink River. Two Burlington County men were on the kayak at the time and the 61 year old was not wearing a life jacket. Developing story more to follow.


Posted by Rumson First Aid Squad

Around 11 PM Thursday night, two Burlington county men were out fishing on a kayak in the Navesink River when a severe weather system caused the men’s kayak to flip over, one man was able to swim to shore.

Borough of Rumson Police Department, Rumson Fire Company, Rumson EMS, Sea Bright Fire, as well as the Coast Guard, NJSP Marine Unit, and MCSO dive team were dispatched and worked tirelessly through the night and into the next day to locate the man, unfortunately the search had to be called off at 10:30 Friday morning as a result of severe currents which hampered the efforts of rescue divers as well as another inbound storm system.

Rumson EMS Sgt. Maloney assisted with search operations while the rest of the squad assisted with rehab. The smooth execution of each agency’s duties was a testament to Monmouth county’s robust emergency services network. And to the level of agency interoperability possible with good communication. We thank all responding agencies for their contribution to the search.

At this time the victims status is still labeled as missing. Our prayers and well wishes are with his family.

Remember to always familiarize yourself with the environmental conditions, always wear a life jacket and never go out on the water without telling anyone.

AG Grewal and Col. Callahan Issue Weekly Round-Up on COVID-19 Enforcement Matters

May 1, 2020

TRENTON – Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal and Colonel Patrick J. Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police, today announced enforcement highlights from the past week, including coughing and spitting assaults and bias incidents, and noteworthy violations of Governor Murphy’s Executive Orders.  The Attorney General also announced enforcement actions targeting price-gouging, consumer fraud violations, and alcoholic beverage control violations. “We’re cracking down on those who jeopardize public health and undermine public safety,” said Attorney General Grewal. “We have zero patience for those who spit on cops, gouge prices, or try to exploit this pandemic for their personal gain.” “Although law enforcement and medical professionals are on the frontlines of the battle against COVID-19, we are ultimately winning the war because of the extraordinary resolve and fortitude of New Jersey citizens who are doing their part day in and day out, abiding by the executive orders and sacrificing for the greater good,” said Colonel Patrick Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police.  “Those who choose to ignore the law and selfishly place others at risk will face swift law enforcement action.” Assaults and Threats Against Police Officers, EMTs, or Others

  • John R. Hendricks, 19, of Rumson, was charged on April 25 by the Middletown Township Police Department with terroristic threats during an emergency (2nd degree), aggravated assault on a police officer (3rd degree), resisting arrest (3rd degree), criminal mischief (3rd degree), and violating the emergency orders.  Andrew R. Jacome, 18, of Fair Haven, was charged with criminal mischief (3rd degree) and violating the emergency orders.  Homeowners called police to report two subjects throwing rocks at their door, vandalizing their vehicle, and exploding fireworks in their mailbox.  Police arrested Hendricks and Jacome nearby.  Hendricks allegedly attempted to flee and physically resisted arrest.  He allegedly screamed at the victims, threatening to return and burn their house down.  At police headquarters, Hendricks allegedly tried to kick officers and spat on the floor, claiming he had the coronavirus.         
  • Alana B. Hall, 24, of Wenonah, was charged on April 26 by the Woodbury Police with terroristic threats during an emergency (2nd degree), aggravated assault (3rd degree), and disorderly conduct. It is alleged that Hall purposely coughed on medical staff at Inspira Medical Center and said she was infected with COVID-19.  She allegedly scratched and struck a nurse technician, spat on her, and fought with other medical personnel.
  • Jaymee Tice, 37, of Point Pleasant Borough, was charged on April 26 by the Point Pleasant Borough Police with second-degree terroristic threats during an emergency.  Tice entered the driver’s seat of an occupied vehicle while the driver was inside getting ice cream at Sundaes on Route 88.  The car owner saw Tice and returned to her vehicle. She managed to get Tice out, but Tice allegedly shouted at her, saying, “Do you want corona? Do you want to die?”
  • Jenna Richardson, 24, of West Deptford, was charged on April 29 by the West Deptford Police with second degree terroristic threats during an emergency and fourth-degree throwing bodily fluid at an officer. Richardson allegedly spat on an officer and said she had COVID-19.
  • Quentin Daniels, 33, of Mount Laurel, was charged by the Mount Laurel Police on April 28 with aggravated assault on a law enforcement officer (4th degree) and obstruction (disorderly persons offense).  Police responded to a report of a domestic dispute.  Daniels refused to cooperate and attempted to leave. While being handcuffed, he allegedly purposely coughed on officers and said he had the coronavirus.  Throughout his transport and upon his initial detention at headquarters, he continually removed the N95 mask placed on him by police and repeatedly coughed on officers, saying, “I hope you all get the virus.”

Theft of Personal Protective Equipment

  • Stephen Milligan, 54, of South Amboy, was charged yesterday with conspiring with Kevin R. Brady, 49, of Point Pleasant Beach, to steal up to 1,600 respirator masks from Prudential Financial in Iselin.  Brady was charged in the theft on April 23.  Like Brady, Milligan was charged with theft by unlawful taking and conspiracy to commit theft, both third-degree charges. The two men were charged in an ongoing investigation by the New Jersey State Police, Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office, Woodbridge Police Department, and Point Pleasant Beach Police Department, based on a referral from the National Hoarding & Price-Gouging Task Force headed by New Jersey U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito.  Brady and Milligan were on-site electrical contractors who had access to storage areas in the Prudential Financial facility.  Between March 27 and April 1, Brady and Milligan allegedly stole seven to eight cases of N95 respirator masks, each case containing 200 masks.  Prudential Financial had intended to donate the masks to a local hospital.  The Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office issued a press release detailing this further.

Price Gouging Enforcement ​AG Grewal announced updates on the Division of Consumer Affairs’ actions to stop price gouging. As of this week: 

  • The Division has issued 92 subpoenas to retailers and online market places reported by consumers for allegedly engaging in unfair price increases.
  • Approximately 756 cease-and-desist letters have been sent, warning retailers about the penalties for violating New Jersey’s price-gouging law, and the Consumer Fraud Act’s protections from gross and unreasonable inflation of the price of any product during a state of emergency.

 The Division has logged a total of 4,245 complaints related to the COVID-19 emergency against 2,358 locations. Nearly 90 percent of the complaints allege unlawful price hikes on essential items like food, bottled water, cleaning products, and personal protective equipment such as masks, disinfectants and sanitizers. Examples of alleged price hikes that consumers have reported to the Division include:

  • a convenience store allegedly charging $4.50 for a quart of milk
  • a wholesale store allegedly selling a case of paper towels for $65, almost double the previous $35 price
  • a supermarket allegedly raising the price of bacon from $4 to $9.99—an increase of over 50%
  • a medical supply store allegedly selling a 2.4-once bottle of hand sanitizer for $13.42
  • a convenience store allegedly charging $30 for a single face mask
  • a dollar store allegedly charging $3.99 for a package of gloves that used to cost $1.49
  • a gas station allegedly selling purified water that normally costs $3 for $14 a pack
  • a pharmacy allegedly charging $10 for small plastic containers of sanitizing wipes, which were previously sold for $3.99
  • a deli allegedly selling a dozen eggs for $5.99

 In addition to price gouging, the Division is looking into complaints from consumers alleging unlawful refund practices as a result of closures related to the COVID-19 health emergency. To date, the Division’s overall complaints include 202 reports of health clubs, hotels, ticket agents and other business allegedly refusing to issue refunds after they closed or suspended services as a result of theCOVID-19 pandemic. New Jersey’s price-gouging law, which took effect on March 9 upon Governor Murphy’s declaration of a state of emergency, prohibits excessive price increases during a declared state of emergency and for 30 days after its termination. A price increase is considered excessive if the new price is more than 10 percent higher than the price charged during the normal course of business prior to the state of emergency, and the increased price is not attributable to additional costs imposed by the seller’s supplier or additional costs of providing the product or service during the state of emergency. Price-gouging and other consumer fraud violations are punishable by civil penalties of up to $10,000 for the first violation and $20,000 for the second and subsequent violations. Violators may also be required to pay consumer restitution, attorney’s fees, and investigative fees, and will be subject to injunctive relief. Each sale of merchandise is considered a separate violation. Consumers who suspect consumer fraud, violations, or believe that businesses have unfairly increased their prices in response to COVID-19, are encouraged to file complaints online to report specific details investigators can follow up on. Photographs of items being sold, receipts and pricing can now be uploaded to our new price gouging complaint form.           Other Violations of Executive Orders, Including “Stay at Home” Order, and Ordinances

  • Newark Enforcement.  The Newark Police Department’s COVID-19 task force issued 490 summonses for violations of the emergency orders and ordered eight non-essential businesses closed in enforcement actions during the past week, April 24 through 30.
  • Paterson Enforcement.  The Paterson Police Department’s issued 21 summonses for violations of the emergency orders in enforcement actions on April 27.
  • Stephanie Hazelton, 48, of Medford, was charged with violating the emergency orders for her role in organizing and participating in a protest at the Capitol Complex in Trenton on April 28.  She was served with a complaint-summons at her residence.
  • Christopher Pitts, 38, of West Deptford, was charged on April 25 by the West Deptford Police Department with violating the emergency orders by allowing golfers to play at the golf course he operates, Westwood Golf Course.  Police had previously warned Pitts, but found approximately 24 people golfing on the course and sharing golf carts without social distancing. 
  • Naman Rafi, 39, of Galloway, was charged by the Galloway Police Department on April 24 with two violations of the emergency orders for opening his business, Tobacco Outlet on Jimmie Leeds Road.  Rafi had been warned several times about closing the business.
  • Delvis Rivera, 34, of Newark, was charged on April 24 by the North Arlington Police with violating the emergency orders for cutting hair at the business where he works, Avenue Cuts 34 on Ridge Road.  This was the second complaint about the barber shop being open.
  • Zachary Novosellar, 62, of Lakewood, was charged on April 28 by the Lakewood Police for hosting an engagement party at his residence on 14th Street.  Police found 25 to 30 cars parked on the street and approximately 20 people standing in front of the residence, without social distancing.  Novosellar said he arranged for the parties to meet to pick up engagement gifts. 
  • John C Bigham, 46, of Chatham, was charged on April 28 with violating the emergency orders by holding a large birthday party for his wife.  Police found a gathering of 25 to 30 people congregating and drinking on his front lawn. The crowd dispersed once the police came.
  • Miran Lee, 44, of Passaic, was cited twice by the Passaic Police Department, on April 29 and April 30, for violating the emergency orders by opening her massage business on Brook Avenue, which operates under the names Sky Spa, Ohangs and New Asian Massage.
  • Janice Lauria, 52, of Point Pleasant, was charged by the Point Pleasant Police on April 28 with violating the emergency orders by ignoring repeated warnings from the police and allowing individuals to exercise in the gym she owns on Route 88, Anytime Fitness.

 Violation of the emergency orders is a disorderly persons offense carrying a sentence of up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.  Such violations are charged by summons, without arrest. COVID-Related Violations of State Alcohol Laws AG Grewal announced that the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) this week issued charges against 20 bars, restaurants, breweries and liquor stores for violating executive orders related to COVID-19. All 20 establishments face suspension of their liquor licenses for at least 10 days. Two other establishments were issued fines for lesser COVID-19 related infractions. Under executive orders issued by Governor Murphy, businesses licensed to sell alcohol in the state are permitted to remain open during the COVID-19 state-of-emergency, but only for take-out or delivery services of food and alcohol. No table or bar service is permitted, on premise alcohol consumption is prohibited, and alcoholic beverages “to go” must be in sealed original containers. The establishments facing suspension for violating the orders are:

  • Alchemist and Barrister in Princeton
  • Bask Bar and Grill in Woodland Park
  • Buteco Sports Bar in Long Branch
  • Core 3 Brewery in Clayton
  • Devil’s Creek Brewery in Collingswood
  • Disabled American Veterans, Clifton Chapter #2 in Clifton
  • Lina’s Restaurant in Bloomingdale
  • Linwood Inn in Linden
  • Medina Liquor Store in Elizabeth
  • Old Glory Kitchen and Spirits in Keyport
  • Quilvio’s Tavern in Paterson
  • Rail’s Steak House in Towaco
  • Randolph Diner in Randolph
  • Riviera Maya in Branchville
  • Riviera Maya in Rockaway
  • Tacos El Tio in Medford
  • Taphouse 15 in Wharton
  • The Sawmill in Seaside Heights
  • Vincenzo’s Ristorante in Middlesex

The establishments that received fines are:

  • Juliano’s Restaurant in Egg Harbor Township ($500) for offering investigators a beer before they identified themselves.
  • The Liquor King in Pennsauken ($750) for violation of face mask requirements.

 Since the state of emergency was declared in New Jersey on March 9, at least 28 people have been charged with second-degree terroristic threats during an emergency for spitting, coughing, or otherwise threatening to deliberately expose officers, medical personnel, or others to COVID-19.  Second-degree offenses carry a sentence of five to 10 years in state prison and a fine of up to $150,000. Third-degree charges carry a sentence of three to five years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000, while fourth-degree charges carry a sentence of up to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty. If you are seeing a lack of compliance with the Governor’s emergency orders in your town, please contact your local police department or report here https://covid19.nj.gov/violation The Attorney General’s Office and New Jersey State Police will continue to work with law enforcement throughout New Jersey to deter non-complaint behavior. No one should take advantage of this pandemic to further their own biased agendas.  COVID-19 is no excuse to promote anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and or other biased stereotypes.  Please report bias crimes at 1-800-277-BIAS.

Rep. Chris Smith’s Annual High School Art Competition Opens ‘Virtually’

April 24, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER) – For the first time ever, the annual Congressional Art Competition held by Rep. Chris Smith as part of a national competition for his district’s high school students, will be a “virtual” online show to ensure the safety of students, parents, teachers and the interested public.

    In response to the coronavirus national emergency, the artwork, which is normally displayed for a month at the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Hamilton’s Lakefront Gallery, will be posted on Smith’s congressional website ensuring that the students who have worked for many months can still take part in the national competition.

    “For these young student artists whose school year has been turned upside down by coronavirus, I am happy we found a way forward and I am grateful to the parents, judges and teachers for making needed adjustments,” Smith said.

    “We received strong support for a virtual art competition rather than cancel the show outright due to COVID-19 restrictions,” Smith said. “Safety is paramount, and a virtual gallery enables us to proceed safely not only for the students and parents, but for the patients and workers at RWJ-Hamilton, which has in the past, graciously hosted the show,” he said.

“I am delighted that this year’s show wasn’t canceled, but continued as an online competition,” said Wall High School art teacher, Jill Alexander, who has been preparing her students to enter the show every year for the past six years. “Students in the 4th district are thankful for the great show that Congressman Chris Smith puts on each year, but especially this year because of the challenges everyone is facing.”

“We love going to Robert Wood Johnson’s impressive gallery, and unfortunately that just wasn’t possible this year. My students start working in September preparing their best artwork to submit, and this show is the highlight of the year for us. 

“High school students across the country will miss the opportunity to participate in many events this year, including proms, sporting events and even graduation,” Alexander said. “We are really pleased the art competition survives.” 

             The 2020 show will be exhibited in a virtual art gallery, will use online judging, with winners to be announced in May. Smith’s three-member team of professional judges, whose works are also normally displayed at the show, will also have artwork posted in an online gallery.

     This year, students who place in the competition—as best-of-show, and first, second and third runners-up and honorable mentions—will receive ribbons and all participants will be mailed Congressional Certificates, instead of being presented them in person.

   The best-in-show winner will be displayed in the Capitol Building in Washington along the busy public corridor/tunnel between the Cannon House Office Building and the Capitol Building for one year with other winners from across the nation. All the artwork entered into Smith’s competition this year will be displayed in his online gallery for one year.

   Every year the Congressional Institute sponsors this national high school art competition to recognize and foster artistic talent in each congressional district. Since the competition began in 1982, more than 650,000 high school students have participated. Participation in the contest is at the discretion of each Member office. Currently, the Institute plans to accept the top winning artwork from every congressional show in America by June 18 and hold a reception in Washington on July 22.

     For information about the 2020 NJ-04 show or to view the 2019 and prior year winners visit Congressman Smith’s Congressional Art Competition web page.

County Freeholders: About Park Closings, COVID-19 and TakeoutInMonmouth.com

April 9, 2020

FREEHOLD, NJ – On behalf of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, Monmouth County Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone and Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley held a press conference today to provide updates on the COVID-19 situation and additional support that the County will supply the business community.

“Since the start of the Take Out in Monmouth initiative last week, we have complied well over 750 businesses, which can be found at www.takeoutinmonmouth.com,” said Freeholder Director Arnone, liaison to the Divisions of Economic Development and Tourism. “Today, we are now adding breweries and wineries to this online list to further boost the local economy. These business owners are our friends, neighbors and community leaders and we owe our support to these individuals and their employees during this difficult time.”


Visit http://takeoutinmounmouth.com https://co.monmouth.nj.us/page.aspx?ID=5029 for further local listings.

Visit the Screaming Hill Brewery page for barnside pickup. Orders placed the day before will be ready the next day for pickup. Try the “Blood Orange” a midjersey.news favorite.

Visit Screamin Hill our local farm fresh brewery for barn side pickup. Remember to place order the day before for pickup the next day.

Heavenly Havens Has Ice Cream Takeout Window:

LaPiazza Delivers now, you might be lucky enough to have DJ Nebbs deliver for you:


Together, Monmouth County municipalities, local chambers as well as the County Divisions of Economic Development and Tourism continue to research and identify all food grocers, breweries, wineries and restaurants open. While the County works to maintain an updated list, email TakeOutInMonmouth@visitmonmouth.com to be listed or request a change in listing.


“As a result of mounting cases and more and more residents becoming increasingly frightened to leave their own home, the Monmouth County Aging Disability Resource Center has prepared the COVID-19 Resource Guide to assist seniors and residents with disabilities who may be struggling to acquire basic needs during this health pandemic,” said Freeholder Deputy Director Kiley, liaison to the Department of Human Services. “The County has been extensively collaborating with local officials and the guide will be frequently updated to reflect the most current services and resources offered by municipality.”

In addition to Monmouth County ADRC (Aging Disability Resource Center), Monmouth ACTS (Assisting Communities Through Services) has been directing residents to Monmouth Resource Net, an online directory of community and health resources and services, information about residential mortgage relief as well as mental health support.

The Freeholders also discussed the Executive Order signed on Thursday, April 7 by the Governor, closing all Monmouth County parks indefinitely.

“I would like to publicly state that I do not support the indefinite closure of all county parks in New Jersey. I also find it unacceptable that we have no input as to when they will reopen. There are a number of options that could have been considered as an alternative to completely closing county parks, including limiting hours, days, et cetera,” said Freeholder Director Arnone. “The Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders has felt, throughout this entire pandemic, that our County parks are essential for our residents’ mental health and a great choice for passive recreation. I promise that we will open our parks immediately as soon as the Executive Order is lifted.”

All public is restricted from parks and golf courses. Park and golf course entrances and parking lots are gated or barricaded and visitors who gain park access by foot or bike will be directed to leave, as the parks will still be patrolled. Marina services are suspended but owners will have access to their boats.

Monmouth County news updates and information regarding the COVID-19 situation are posted at www.visitmonmouth.com.

AG Grewal and Colonel Callahan Issue Daily Update on Charges Filed Against Violators of Governor Murphy’s COVID-19 Executive Orders

April 6, 2020

TRENTON – Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal and Colonel Patrick J. Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police, announced the following recent enforcement actions against violators of Governor Murphy’s Emergency Orders related to COVID-19:

  • Newark Enforcement. The Newark Police Department’s COVID-19 task force issued 26 summonses for violations of the emergency orders and ordered four non-essential businesses closed in enforcement actions yesterday, April 5.
  • Rumson Party— Ryan Sheftel, 46 of Rumson, was charged last night with disorderly conduct and violating a borough ordinance by disturbing the peace in connection with the large party and concert in Rumson on Saturday night, April 4. When officers ordered the partygoers to disperse, Sheftel allegedly cursed at the police and shouted “Welcome to Nazi Germany.” Earlier yesterday, the host of the party, homeowner John Maldjian, 54, of Rumson, was charged with reckless endangerment, disorderly conduct, and two separate charges related to violating the emergency orders – all disorderly persons offenses – and violation of two borough ordinances.
  • Marco Costa, 28, of Harrison, was charged today by police in Kearny with terroristic threats during an emergency (2nd degree), three counts of throwing bodily fluid at a law enforcement officer (4th degree), five counts of attempted burglary (3rd degree), and possession of a hypodermic syringe (disorderly persons offense). Costa was arrested after police received a report of a man fitting his description pulling on car door handles in the area. While being handcuffed, Costa allegedly told officers he had the coronavirus and purposely coughed at them.
  • Dennis Steward, 52, of Valley Stream, N.Y., was charged on April 4 in Hamilton, Mercer County, with terroristic threats during an emergency (2nd degree), throwing bodily fluid at an officer (4th degree), and DWI. Steward was charged after he crashed into a house on South Olden Avenue in Hamilton. He was taken to St. Francis Hospital in Trenton at his request after he complained of chest pains. While there, he allegedly became aggressive and spat on hospital security guards, two Hamilton police officers, and a nurse. He claimed he had Covid-19 and had just come back from visiting someone in Bronx, N.Y., who died from the virus.
  • Derrick E. Hughes II, 32, of Woolwich, was charged on April 5 with terroristic threats during an emergency (2nd degree), endangering (3rd degree), throwing bodily fluid at an officer (4th degree), violation of a temporary restraining order (TRO) (disorderly persons offense), and violating the emergency orders. Hughes was arrested by the Woolwich Township Police for violation of a TRO, and while being fingerprinted, he allegedly spat at officers. While being handcuffed, he allegedly breathed heavily on an officer and stated that he had COVID-19 and hoped the officers would catch it.
  • Terrance Edwards, 34, of New Brunswick, was arrested early today by New Brunswick police after he allegedly broke into a residence while naked and armed with a knife. He left that residence and allegedly attempted unsuccessfully to break into a neighboring residence. When officers arrived, Edwards yelled that he had the coronavirus. He was charged with burglary (2nd degree), possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose (3rd degree), unlawful possession of a weapon (4th degree), and violation of the executive orders.
  • Anekia Dawkins, 35, of Morristown, was charged by local police with violating the executive orders for holding a party at her residence with more than 10 people on Saturday night, April 4.
  • Tyeashia Henderson, 20, of Hillside, was charged by police with violating the executive orders for holding a party at her house with approximately 20 people on Sunday, April 5.
  • Steven Nunez, 22, of Clifton, Tiffany Colon, 21, of Clifton, and Valerie Saez, 22, of Passaic, were charged with violating the emergency orders after a West Milford police officer found them parked in a vehicle at the Clinton Road Reservoir boat launch after hours.

“Our police officers are working bravely and tirelessly every day to protect us during this health crisis. Regrettably, they are being called upon far too often to deal with people violating the emergency orders— or what is more egregious, people using the virus to spread fear or impede officers in their vital work,” said Attorney General Grewal. “Staying home and maintaining social distance isn’t just the best advice to stay healthy, it’s the law. Make no mistake, we will do everything in our power to keep our residents and officers safe, and that means we won’t hesitate to file charges against violators.””Law enforcement and medical professionals are on the frontlines of this battle to protect the citizens of New Jersey from the COVID-19 virus, and we cannot stress enough how important it is that each person follow the guidelines set forth in the Executive Order,” said Colonel Patrick Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police. “Because lives are at stake, enforcement action will be taken without hesitation against those who are blatantly placing the lives of others at risk.”

Violations of the emergency orders constitute a disorderly persons offense carrying a potential sentence of up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. However, violators can potentially face criminal charges including second, third, and fourth degree indictable offenses.

Last week, Attorney General Grewal announced enhanced charges against six individuals who were charged with assaulting law enforcement officers and violating the emergency orders. Specifically, those enhanced charges included making terroristic threats during a state of emergency, which is a second degree offense and carries a sentence of five to 10 years in state prison and a fine of up to $150,000. Defendants Costa, Steward, and Hughes are similarly charged for their conduct against law enforcement officers.

Second-degree charges carry a sentence of five to 10 years in state prison and a fine of up to $150,000, while third-degree charges carry a sentence of three to five years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000. Fourth-degree charges carry a sentence of up to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

If you are seeing a lack of compliance with the Governor’s emergency orders in your town, please contact your local police department or report here https://covid19.nj.gov/violation

The Attorney General’s Office and New Jersey State Police will continue to work with law enforcement throughout New Jersey to deter non-complaint behavior.

No one should take advantage of this pandemic to further their own biased agendas. COVID-19 is no excuse to promote anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and or other biased stereotypes. Please report bias crimes at 1-800-277-BIAS.

AG Grewal and Colonel Callahan Issue Update on Charges Filed Against Violators of Governor Murphy’s COVID-19 Executive Orders

April 5, 2020

TRENTON – Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal and Colonel Patrick J. Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police, announced the following recent enforcement actions against violators of Governor Murphy’s Emergency Orders related to COVID-19. “The Governor’s executive orders are commonsense measures to keep people safe during this historic health crisis,” said Attorney General Grewal.  “When people like the partiers in Rumson flout the orders and show disrespect and hostility to police officers, they not only put themselves and the others immediately involved in peril, they risk inciting others to engage in such irresponsible and dangerous behavior.  Our police officers are working courageously every day to protect us all, and we will continue to charge anyone who violates the emergency orders, which literally are a matter of life and death.” “Law enforcement and medical professionals are on the frontlines of this battle to protect the citizens of New Jersey from the COVID-19 virus, and we cannot stress enough how important it is that each person follow the guidelines set forth in the Executive Order,” said Colonel Patrick Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police. “I have said that law enforcement will act swiftly against those who blatantly place the lives of others at risk. Well, you don’t get much more blatant than the party crowd in Rumson that resisted and insulted police officers who asked them to disperse.” 

  • Newark Enforcement.  The Newark Police Department’s COVID-19 task force issued 180 summonses for violation of the emergency orders and ordered 11 non-essential businesses closed in enforcement actions on Friday and Saturday, April 3 and 4.
  • Rumson Party—John Maldjian, age 54 of Rumson, was charged today by the Rumson Police with reckless endangerment, disorderly conduct, and two separate charges related to violating the emergency orders. All are disorderly persons offenses. He was also charged with violating two borough ordinances. The charges stem from an incident in Rumson on Saturday evening, April 3. At approximately 8:19 p.m., the police were dispatched to a report of a large party with a band.  When they arrived, they discovered the homeowner, John Maldjian, together with another man, playing acoustic guitars on the front porch of the home.  There were approximately 30 people, between the ages of 40 and 50,  gathered on Maldjian’s front lawn and the adjoining street watching the performance.  Some had lawn chairs and alcoholic beverages. Despite the fact that police were on scene with flashing lights attempting to disperse the crowd, the band continued playing. It was not until a Rumson officer directly approached Maldjian that he stopped singing and playing.  Maldjian then told his Facebook Live audience (he was streaming his performance) that he had to stop playing. The crowd became unruly when told to disperse and some shouted curses at the police and “Welcome to Nazi Germany.”  Charges related to those disorderly “audience” members are forthcoming.
  • Sughuy Cepeda, 43, of Teaneck, was charged with second-degree terroristic threats during an emergency, two counts of third-degree aggravated assault on an officer, obstruction, resisting arrest, and violation of a temporary restraining order (TRO). On Saturday, April 4, Cepeda was arrested by the Englewood Police Department for violation of a TRO. While in custody, Cepeda spit and coughed at officers on several occasions and stated she was COVID positive.  Cepeda was transported to Bergen New Bridge Medical Center in Paramus. There, she allegedly coughed at two police officers and spit a mouthful of water at them.
  • Wegmans Coughing Incident.  The West Windsor Police Department signed juvenile petitions for harassment and obstruction of justice against a 16-year-old female for allegedly purposely coughing on another customer at the Wegmans food store in West Windsor on Tuesday, March 31.  The victim, a 52-year-old woman, had asked the juvenile to step back because she was too close. The juvenile and her mother got into an argument with the victim, during which the juvenile allegedly pulled down a facial mask she was wearing, walked closer to the victim, and coughed toward the victim while claiming that she had the coronavirus.
  • Rita A Lacis, 61, of Parsippany, was charged with violating the emergency order on Saturday, April 4, by the Rockaway Borough Police Department.  Police had given Lacis a warning after they learned that she was continuing to operate her dog grooming service.  At that time, she claimed that she misunderstood the order requiring closure of all non-essential businesses.  She was charged when officer saw two customers drop off a dog a short time later.
  • Saul Rosen, 52, of Toms River, was charged on Saturday, April 4, with violating the emergency orders for hold a gathering in his back yard with more than 20 people.
  • Luke Shuscavage, 27, of Princeton, N.J., was charged on Friday, April 3, with violating the emergency orders for bringing five youths from a youth shelter to Lenape Park in Raritan Township to play basketball.

 Violations of the emergency orders constitute a disorderly persons offense carrying a potential sentence of up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.  However, violators can potentially face criminal charges including second, third, and fourth degree indictable offenses. Last week, Attorney General Grewal announced enhanced charges against six individuals who were charged with assaulting law enforcement officers and violating the emergency orders.  Specifically, those enhanced charges included making terroristic threats during a state of emergency, which is a second degree offense and carries a sentence of five to 10 years in state prison and a fine of up to $150,000. Defendant Cepeda is similarly charged for her conduct against law enforcement officers.Third-degree charges carry a sentence of three to five years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000. If you are seeing a lack of compliance with the Governor’s emergency orders in your town, please contact your local police department or report here https://covid19.nj.gov/violation The Attorney General’s Office and New Jersey State Police will continue to work with law enforcement throughout New Jersey to deter non-complaint behavior. The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty. No one should take advantage of this pandemic to further their own biased agendas.  COVID-19 is no excuse to promote anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and or other biased stereotypes.  Please report bias crimes at 1-800-277-BIAS.

Band Sings “F— The Police” As Police Break Up Corona Party of 50 Year Olds, And Keyport Waterfront Shut Down Overcrowding

April 4, 2020

Corona-Party––”we were met with well wishes of “F-the police” and “Welcome to Nazi Germany” from this group of “40-50 year old ADULTS”.

RUMSON, NJ (MONMOUTH)–via the Rumson Police Facebook Page:

***NO CORONA PARTIES***

PINK FLOYD LIVE FROM RUMSON!

This evening the Rumson Police Department received an unfortunate call about a group of 30 people on the front lawn of a house on Blackpoint Rd. near Wood Ln. When our patrols arrived we were met by a group of approx. 30 “40-50” year old ADULTS who were located in the middle of Blackpoint Rd and on the front law attending an acoustic concert of Pink Floyd’s greatest hits. (Some even brought lawn chairs)

The impromptu concert was performed by two guitarists equipped with microphones and amplifiers who were also broadcasting the concert via facebook live.

When we informed everyone that they must leave–in accordance with Governor Murphy’s executive orders regarding these so called “corona-parties”–we were met with well wishes of “F-the police” and “Welcome to Nazi Germany” from this group of “40-50 year old ADULTS”.

As the old saying goes, in the midst of all this chaos, the band still played on, that is until they were advised in the middle of the 1975 classic “Wish you were here”, that they must stop the show.

Sadly i’m sure we all “wish we could be here”, and the Rumson Police Department takes no enjoyment in ruining any ones fun! However we ALL have a responsibility to take this pandemic SERIOUSLY and adhere to the social distancing requirement.
We also need to be a good role model for our children and be kind and understanding during these times.

Please use this incident as a learning experience for everyone! If we have to respond to another “corona party” we will be using a zero tolerance approach. and everyone involved will be charged with Disorderly Conduct. We are all in this together and together we need to make smarter choices.


Tonight our waterfront was shut down due to a large crowd gathering . Your safety is always our first priority. We have closed off the parking lots and are asking non- residents to please not travel to our waterfront as per the governors executive order. We will not be reopening our parking lots to ensure the safety of the public and also our employees, who are still out there being called upon to help remind everyone to social distance and do your part to stop the spread of Covid-19. Thank you for your cooperation.