Category: Mercer County

State Police Arrest Seven after Year-Long Investigation

Detectives Seize Drugs, Firearms, High Capacity Magazines, and $313,000 Cash

September 29, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–The New Jersey State Police have arrested six men and one woman for various drug and firearms offenses after a year-long cooperative investigation with the Trenton Police Department.

In September of 2019, the New Jersey State Police Crime Suppression Central Unit, Opioid Enforcement Task Force, and the Trenton Police Department began surveilling multiple individuals suspected of dealing narcotics in the Trenton and Ewing Township areas of Mercer County.

During the investigation, detectives arrested the suspects at various times and locations. Throughout the operation, the Ewing Township Police Department provided assistance on numerous occasions. Most notably, on Friday, July 10, 2020, a Ewing Township patrol officer who was assisting with the operation was dragged by Daniel Peyton when he fled in a Chevrolet Impala after being stopped by detectives on Stokes Avenue in Ewing Township. Peyton was later apprehended in the area of Shelton Avenue and Chelmsford Court.

As a result of the year-long operation, detectives seized more than 4 kilograms of cocaine, 1 bundle of heroin, 30 grams of marijuana, a 9mm handgun, a .40 caliber handgun, a 9 mm assault weapon, 2 high capacity magazines, hollow point ammunition, a 2016 Toyota Highlander, a 2010 BMW X5, and more than $313,000 cash.

“We will never cease in our collaborative efforts to stop the drug dealers who are fueling addiction and violence in Trenton,” said Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal. “At the same time, we are committed to combating the corrosive influence of these criminals on a second front by working with the community to develop programs for the young people of Trenton that will help them choose a strong and healthy course in life.”

“This operation targeted individuals who were profiting off of addiction and violence and whose actions stood in stark contrast to the countless members of the community who work tirelessly every day to strengthen and build safer neighborhoods,” said Colonel Patrick J. Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police. “We will continue to aggressively target drug dealers and violent criminals, but we will also continue to work with our community partners to implement educational and outreach programs to stay connected to our youth who far too often fall victim to addiction and gun violence.”

“This case demonstrates what we can achieve when we bring the full weight of local and state law enforcement against individuals who target our communities with addiction and violence,” said Trenton Police Director Sheilah A. Coley. “Trenton residents deserve to feel safe in their own neighborhoods, and I commend the officers and detectives who worked tirelessly on their behalf by ridding our streets of multiple firearms and thousands of doses of dangerous narcotics.”

The following were charged:

David Craig, 32, Trenton, N.J.

eluding
unlawful possession of a handgun
certain persons not to possess a firearm
possession of hollow point ammunition
possession of cocaine
possession with the intent to distribute cocaine
possession of a firearm while committing a CDS offense
possession with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of a public park

Davon Craig, 27, Trenton, N.J.

unlawful possession of a handgun
certain persons not to possess a firearm
possession of hollow point ammunition possession of cocaine
possession with the intent to distribute cocaine
possession of a firearm while committing a CDS offense
possession with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of a public park
money laundering

Davae Craig, 31, Trenton, N.J.

possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute
possession of heroin
possession of a high capacity magazine
money laundering

Deesade Meyers, 27, Ewing N.J.

unlawful possession of an assault weapon
unlawful possession of a high capacity magazine
money laundering

Daniel Sabree, 46, Bristol, PA

with possession with the intent to distribute marijuana

Daniel Peyton, 55, Westampton, N.J.

possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute
money laundering
aggravated assault (charged by Ewing Township Police Department)
eluding (charged by Ewing Township Police Department)

Wayne Bessant, 39, Trenton, N.J.

possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute
money laundering
The case is being prosecuted by the Division of Criminal Justice. Charges are mere accusations, and the accused are considered innocent until proven guilty.

Troopers Help Plant Trees to Improve Quality of Water at Rosedale Park

September 28, 2020

PENNINGTON, NJ (MERCER)–On Friday, September 25, members of the Public Information Bureau volunteered their time to help the Mercer County Park Commission plant trees at Rosedale Park in Pennington, N.J.The troopers worked with several other volunteers to help wrap up the week-long project to plant trees and shrubs along the Rosedale Park Lake. Throughout the week, volunteers helped plant approximately 1,200 trees and shrubs, which will help improve water quality in the Stony Brook, feed pollinators, and improve foraging resources for birds. The troopers were glad to assist the Mercer County Park Commission in this outstanding initiative.

BREAKING: Large Power Outage

September 28, 2020

UPDATE As of 9:30 parts of Robbinsville and Upper Freehold have been restored. Others in East Windsor and Hightstown are still out.

UPDATE At of 11:30 pm Hightstown and East Windsor is still without power and estimated restore time is 1:30 am.

UPDATE 9:00 am 9/29/2020 the outage reporting map is still showing some power failures in East Windsor and Millstone with an estimated 11:30 am restoration time. Most have been restored over night but a few are still without power.

ROBBINSVILLE-UPPER FREEHOLD- EAST WINDSOR- MILLSTONE– Wide area power problems in Robbinsville, East Windsor, Upper Freehold and Millstone in areas served by JCP&L no status or cause reported.

JCPL has been notified.

2020 Police Unity Tour Bike Ride Held In NJ


See related MidJersey.News coverage here: Police Unity Tour Memorial Service And Blessing Of Riders


September 27, 2020

Check back for more photos, still having photos sent into MidJersey.News and will be updated again tomorrow or later tonight.

STAFFORD TOWNSHIP, NJ (OCEAN)–The Police Unity Tour held a one day bike ride today starting in Asbury Park and proceeding on shore routes towards Stafford Township ending at the Stafford Township Police Memorial.

This year’s spring four day ride that is usually held in May was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic that ends at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. 

This year’s ride was shortened to one day and two hundred sixty police officers participated from fourteen states including California and Missouri.


History of the Police Unity Tour:

In 1997, Florham Park (NJ) Police Officer Patrick Montuore had a simple idea: organize a four-day bicycle ride from New Jersey to Washington, DC to raise public awareness about law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, and to ensure that their sacrifice is never forgotten. With that, the Police Unity Tour was formed. 

What started with 18 riders on a four day fund-raising bicycle ride from Florham Park, NJ to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. has grown into 9 chapters consisting of nearly 2,600 members nationwide who make the trip annually. Participants include riders, motorcycles, and support personnel.

The journey is long and challending but for the Police Unity Tour participants it is what they prepare for throughout the year. Through fundraising and physical training, they know that their efforts raise awareness of the ultimate sacrifice made by so many law enforcement officers. 

The last leg of the jouney ends at the Memorial, where the participants are greeted by friends, family, and survirors. Once there, many Police Unity Tour members present remembrance braclets worn on their wrists throughout the journey to the families of the fallen. 

May 2020, the Police Unity Tour was proud to donate more than $2.0 million to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, bringing our total donations to more than $30 million since their inception. 

The Police Unity Tour is the sponsor of the National Law Enforcement Museum’s Hall of Remembrance, the Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award, and Recently Fallen Alert programs. 








Video provided by: Bucky For Sherriff








Police Unity Tour Memorial Service And Blessing Of Riders

Police Unity Tour “We Ride For Those Who Died”


See related MidJersey.News coverage of the event here: 2020 Police Unity Tour Bike Ride Held In NJ


September 26, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–This evening the Hamilton Township Police Department hosted a memorial service and blessing of riders that are in tomorrow’s Police Unity Tour ride from Asbury Park to Stafford Twp., NJ.

The primary purpose of the Police Unity Tour is to raise awareness of Law Enforcement Officers who have died in the line of duty. The secondary purpose is to raise funds for the National Law Enforcement Officer’s Memorial.

Normally the ride would be held in May when several Chapters of the Police Unity Tour leave New Jersey on bicycles and ride to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. The over 250 mile journey on bicycles takes 4 days to complete riding at least 62 miles per day.

This year’s spring ride was canceled due to COVID-19 but the Police Unity Tour was able to schedule a one day ride on Sunday.

Some history on the Police Unity Tour:

In 1997, Florham Park (NJ) Police Officer Patrick Montuore had a simple idea: organize a four-day bicycle ride from New Jersey to Washington, DC to raise public awareness about law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, and to ensure that their sacrifice is never forgotten. With that, the Police Unity Tour was formed.

What started with 18 riders on a four day fund-raising bicycle ride from Florham Park, NJ to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C. has grown into 9 chapters consisting of nearly 2,600 members nationwide who make the trip annually. Participants include riders, motorcycles, and support personnel.

The journey is long and challending but for the Police Unity Tour participants it is what they prepare for throughout the year. Through fundraising and physical training, they know that their efforts raise awareness of the ultimate sacrifice made by so many law enforcement officers.

The last leg of the jouney ends at the Memorial, where the participants are greeted by friends, family, and survirors. Once there, many Police Unity Tour members present remembrance braclets worn on their wrists throughout the journey to the families of the fallen.

May 2020, the Police Unity Tour was proud to donate more than $2.0 million to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, bringing our total donations to more than $30 million since their inception.

The Police Unity Tour is the sponsor of the National Law Enforcement Museum’s Hall of Remembrance, the Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award, and Recently Fallen Alert programs.




Trenton EMS Cares For Baby After Serious Accident In Trenton This Morning, At Least 3 Transported To Hospital

September 26, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Just before 11:00 am there was a serious accident at the intersection Perry and Warren Streets when two vehicles collided. One vehicle crashed into a tree and a building and another knocked down a traffic signal. Trenton EMS responded with at least 2 ambulances and treated the victims of the accident. One baby was comforted by a TEMS EMT prior to transport to the hospital for evaluation. Trenton Fire Department also responded to the accident for exposed wires from the traffic signal. Trenton Police was investigating the crash.

In total at least three were transported to Capital Health Regional Medical Center in Trenton.

Usually public information is not available about accidents in the City of Trenton unless a fatal. This is from radio, witness and on scene reporting. If public press information is released the story will be updated and any corrections made.

OnScene News Photos by: Brian McCarthy, OnScene News

#WHATSMYNAME 5k Run/Walk Held In Robbinsville In Honor of Samantha Josephson


Related recent MidJersey.News story here: “Sami’s Law” Passes The House


September 26, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–Hundreds turned out for the #WHATSMYNAME 5K Run/ 1M Walk in honor of, Samantha Josephson. The run/walk supports the What’s My Name Foundation’s efforts regarding Ride Share Safety education. 

The 5K run kicked off a little after 9 am and the 1 mile walk started about the same time this morning.

Samantha grew up in Robbinsville and was Robbinsville High School graduate and was attending University of South Carolina when a rideshare tragedy happened.

On March 29, 2019, Samantha Josephson, a 21 year-old senior at the University of South Carolina, was kidnapped and murdered when she was targeted by a person posing as a rideshare driver.  Immediately following this unfathomable tragedy,  Samantha’s parents, Seymour and Marci Josephson, set out to educate others on the importance of ride share safety so that no other family would have to suffer this kind of loss.   

“Sami’s Law” was authored by Rep. Chris Smith and passed the house in July by a unanimous read more about it here: “Sami’s Law” Passes The House



The #WHATSMYNAME Foundation was established in honor of, Samantha Josephson.  Our mission is to educate the world on ride share safety, supporting charitable organizations and providing college scholarships to selected high school seniors.  Samantha may be gone but our goal for the rest of our time on earth is to share her story and make a lasting change.

Before you get in a ride share ask

“What’s my name?” and remember hers.

Link to #WHATSMYNAME FOUNDATION HERE


Black Lives Matter Protest In Front Of Trenton Police Headquarters

September 25, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–A small gathering of about 20 or so protested in front of Trenton Police Headquarters on North Clinton Avenue tonight at 6 pm. The protest was called “Say Their Names”

OnScene News Photos by: Brian McCarthy, OnScene News

Police And Firefighters Have Siren Parade To Support Child With Stage 4 Cancer

September 25, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–Robbinsville Township Police and Robbinsville Township firefighters were joined by several area departments from three counties in providing Tyler a siren parade. Tyler has a rare stage 4 cancer called Hepatoblastoma. Tyler is fighting the cancer and is undergoing chemotherapy and makes weekly visits to CHOP – Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Tyler also had the chance to meet Robbinsville Township’s K9 Officer Quori and several super heroes prior to the parade event.

Participating departments:

Robbinsville Township Police, NJ State Police, Hamilton Police, Trenton Police and others.

Robbinsville Township Fire Department, Hamilton Township Fire Department, East Windsor Fire Company, Hightstown Fire Company, Princeton Fire Department, Lawrence Township Fire Department, West Windsor Fire Company, Princeton Junction Fire Company, West Windsor Emergency Services, East Windsor Rescue Squad, Monmouth Junction Fire Department, Franklin Fire Company (Mansfield), Kingston Fire Department.



Go Fund Me page here: https://gf.me/u/yz9uws

As some of you may already know, Heather and Jason’s world has been shifted and forever changed by the recent cancer diagnosis for their son Tyler. Doctors  recently found a tumor on Tyler’s liver called Hepatoblastoma.

In early July, Tyler was having fevers and not feeling well. After 3 weeks of him not feeling well, his parents decided to take him to the hospital for additional testing. In the hospital, the doctors ordered an ultrasound for his abdomen. It was there that they learned Tyler had a mass on his liver.

That night Tyler was transferred to CHOP. Tyler quickly had blood work, MRI and CT scans, a PET scan, and a biopsy of his liver. On August 17, 2020 it was confirmed that Tyler’s tumor was Hepatoblastoma. He started chemotherapy soon after his diagnosis.

Fortunately, the scans have shown that the cancer is isolated to Tyler’s liver. Tyler has one very large mass, and several other masses all over his liver, which classifies his cancer as stage IV. Chemotherapy will be the beginning of Tyler’s journey. He will require a future surgery, followed by more chemotherapy. 

Tyler has been a rockstar at every single doctors appointment and chemotherapy treatment. He loves to help the doctors and nurses. When he is home from treatment, he enjoys playing outside with his twin brother Chase, eating Chinese food, and chips. 

Heather and Jason have a long road ahead to ensure that Tyler receives the best treatment. He has a busy schedule between blood work appointments, physical therapy, chemotherapy, and various hospital stays. Heather has already taken a leave of absence from work in order to care for Tyler and support his treatment. 

Tyler is a strong little boy, and Heather and Jay are the best parents he could possibly have, who will fight alongside him. That being said, they can’t do this alone! So many people have asked how they can help, right now –  this is it. The donations will help with covering insurance costs, medical bills, physical therapy copays, prescription costs, meals at the hospital, gas, tolls, and coffee for mom and dad.  Any donation will help take some of the burden that comes along with extensive medical treatment, so they can focus on Tyler and Chase.

Although this type of cancer is rare, it is treatable and curable. Tyler has a wonderful team of doctors at CHOP. Tyler has a long road ahead of him, but his positive attitude keeps everyone going each day.  Tyler is our super hero!!!

Please keep Tyler in your prayers. All the continued support you can offer will be forever appreciated by the Odman Family.

Love,
Heather, Jason, Tyler, and Chase


State and Local Officials Investigating Cases of Legionnaires’ Disease In Hamilton Township

September 25, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–The Hamilton Township Division of Health, working closely with the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH), has identified a potential cluster of Legionnaires’ disease cases within Hamilton Township.

Legionnaires’ disease is relatively uncommon with most cases occurring in New Jersey between the months of July and October, typically peaking in August. The cluster the Division of Health is investigating includes four Township residents with confirmed cases of Legionnaires’ disease, two of which have since died. The residents became ill between August 18 and August 24, 2020. Due to HIPAA and the right to privacy, specific information on each case cannot be disclosed.

“While the risk to our residents remains low, Legionnaires’ disease can be a serious illness especially for those who are older or have underlying health concerns,” stated Hamilton Township Health Officer Christopher Hellwig. “If you’re not feeling well and have respiratory illness like symptoms such as fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, and headache I encourage you to speak with your medical provider. Legionnaires’ disease can be successfully treated with antibiotics, and is not spread from person-to-person”

Legionnaires’ disease is a form of pneumonia caused by Legionella bacteria. People can get Legionnaires’ disease by breathing in aerosolized water containing Legionella bacteria. Aerosolized water, also known as small droplets, can come from cooling towers (air-conditioning units for large buildings), hot tubs, cooling misters, decorative fountains, and plumbing systems.  Legionella bacteria can be found in water systems of any type, but people cannot get ill with Legionnaires’ disease by drinking water.  Home air conditioning units do not use water to cool, so these home units do not aerosolize water and are not a risk for Legionella growth.

While it is often difficult to determine the origin of the bacteria that infected the Hamilton residents, the investigation is ongoing and the Division of Health is attempting to identify potential sources of exposure. NJDOH and the Hamilton Division of Health recently collected environmental samples from selected sites. Additionally, Hamilton Township has hired an independent laboratory to conduct water sampling at various locations around the Township. NJDOH, Hamilton Division of Health, and NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) are working to identify additional sites to sample. The sample locations the Township has identified thus far are in the Mercerville section of the Township.

“NJDOH and the Hamilton Township Division of Health are working closely together to identify potential sources of Legionella exposure,” said Edward M. Lifshitz, MD, FACP, Medical Director, Communicable Disease Service, New Jersey Department of Health. “Since this is a continuing investigation, healthcare providers are urged to test patients with community-acquired and healthcare-acquired pneumonia for Legionnaires’ disease, especially among residents of Hamilton Township. This is important to ensure patients receive appropriate and timely treatment.”

Most people exposed to Legionella bacteria do not develop Legionnaires’ disease. People over the age of 50, especially those who smoke cigarettes, or those with certain medical conditions, including weakened immune systems, chronic lung disease or other chronic health conditions, are at increased risk for Legionnaires’ disease.

“Upon learning of the positive cases, and given Hamilton’s history with Legionnaire’s disease, our Health Department took swift action to investigate these cases and search not only for a common link, but for any continued possible exposure to our residents,” stated Mayor Jeff Martin. “I want to thank NJDOH and NJDEP for working with our staff to coordinate efforts to ensure our residents remain healthy.”  “The symptoms of Legionnaires’ Disease and COVID-19 can be very similar which makes it even more important that anyone experiencing these symptoms immediately contact their medical provider.” 

For more information about Legionnaires’ disease, of if you think you may have had or currently have Legionnaires’ disease make sure to speak with your medical provider. Residents can also find additional information online from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov/legionella.

Protest Against A4576 And S2907 Requiring Mandatory Flu Vaccinations Held At Statehouse

Assembly 4576 and

September 24, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Over 1,000 attended a rally today at the NJ State House to protest against New Jersey Assembly Bill A4576 and matching NJ Senate S2907 Requires students and certain other children to be annually vaccinated for influenza as condition of enrollment at public and private K-12 schools, preschools, child care centers, and institutions of higher education.


Assembly 4576 Statement below, read entire A4576 bill here

Read identical NJ Senate Bill S2907 here

  This bill requires students who attend a public or private K-12 school, preschool, child care center, or institution of higher education to be annually vaccinated for influenza as a condition of enrollment and continued attendance at the school or center. 

     Commencing with the 2020-2021 school year:

     1)    a principal, director, or other person in charge of a public or private school in this State will be prohibited from knowingly admitting or retaining in grades K through 12 a child whose parent or guardian has not submitted acceptable evidence, by December 31 of the relevant school year, showing that the child has received an annual vaccination for influenza;

     2)    an executive director, administrator, or other person in charge of a preschool or child care center will be prohibited from knowingly admitting or retaining in the preschool or child care center a child whose parent or guardian has not submitted acceptable evidence, by December 31 of the relevant school year, showing that the child has received an annual vaccination for influenza; and

     3)    an administrator or other person in charge of an institution of higher education in this State will be prohibited from knowingly admitting or retaining a student who has not submitted acceptable evidence, by December 31 of the relevant school year, showing that the student has received an annual vaccination for influenza.

     Consistent with existing laws pertaining to the mandatory vaccination of children and students, the bill would provide that a child or student will be exempt from the bill’s vaccination requirements if:

     1)    a written statement is submitted to the K-12 school, preschool, child care center, or institution of higher education by a licensed physician indicating that the vaccine is medically contraindicated for a specific period of time and the reasons for the medical contraindication, which are to be valid medical reasons as determined by regulation of the commissioner.  Such statement will exempt the child or student from the vaccination for the period of time stated therein; or

     2)    a written statement is submitted to the K-12 school, preschool, or child care center by the child’s or student’s parent or guardian, if the child or student is a minor, or by the student, if the student is 18 years of age or older, explaining how the administration of the vaccine conflicts with the bona fide religious tenets or practices of the child or student, or of the parent or guardian, as the case may be, except that a general philosophical or moral objection to the vaccination will not be sufficient for an exemption to be granted on religious grounds. 

     Children attending public or private K-12 schools, child care centers, and preschools in New Jersey are already required by existing law to be vaccinated for various contagious and dangerous diseases, including diphtheria, hepatitis B, measles, meningitis, mumps, pertussis, pneumococcal disease, polio, rubella, tetanus, and varicella, as a condition of attendance at the institution.  Students of higher education are further required to verify their receipt of these vaccinations as a condition of their attendance at an institute of higher education.  Although children in New Jersey who are between six and 59 months of age and who are attending a child-care center or preschool facility are additionally required by the State Sanitary Code to receive an annual vaccination for influenza, this requirement is not codified in the statutory law.

     In March 2020, Governor Murphy issued Executive Order No. 103, which declared a public health emergency and state of emergency in New Jersey in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).  COVID-19 is a newly discovered and highly contagious pandemic-level disease that has spread quickly throughout the world, nation, and State, and against which humans have no natural immunity.  It is associated with a wide range of symptoms, including, but not limited to, fever, cough, difficulty breathing, chills, sudden loss of smell or taste, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, many of which overlap with the symptoms of seasonal influenza.  It is also possible for a person to become simultaneously infected with both COVID-19 and influenza, which may not only cause the person to experience more severe symptoms, but may also cause problems both for health care providers, in relation to their ability to provide the patient with an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment, and for administrators of schools, preschools, and child care centers, in relation to their ability to identify and appropriately respond to outbreaks occurring at those institutions.

     The vaccination of children and students for influenza will significantly reduce the number of children and students in the State who experience severe flu symptoms or a severe combination of flu and COVID-19 symptoms, will help reduce competition among flu and COVID-19 patients for similar medical resources, and will result in fewer emergency department visits and hospitalizations related to influenza, thereby enabling the State to preserve its hospital capacity and emergency and intensive care resources for patients who are infected with COVID-19 or other severe diseases and ailments.

     Preschools, child care centers, and K-12 schools, where children come into close contact with and freely mingle with each other and adult faculty and staff members, and institutions of higher education, where students often live in communal settings and come into close contact with thousands of other students, faculty, and other staff in dormitories, lecture halls, sports arenas, and other large, on-campus venues, are the types of institutions that may facilitate the quick and uncontrollable spread of COVID-19; however, because these institutions operate during flu season, it may be difficult for these institutions and for health care officials to quickly determine, for the purposes of implementing preventative and responsive measures, whether an outbreak of illness at the institution is occurring as a result of the spread of COVID-19 or influenza.  By requiring the vaccination of children and students for influenza, the State can make it easier for these institutions to identify which children or students, if any, are showing signs of COVID-19 infection.

     Because of the severe, unprecedented, and unpredictable nature of COVID-19, the fact that there is currently no vaccine or preventative treatment for COVID-19, the commonalities that exist between COVID-19 and influenza, the fact that a person may simultaneously be infected with both diseases, the fact that patients with influenza will compete with COVID-19 patients and other severely ill patients for hospital space and resources, and the unique characteristics of public and private K-12 schools, preschools, child care centers, and institutions of higher education, it is both reasonable and necessary for the Legislature to require children and students at these institutions to be annually vaccinated for influenza, as a condition of their continued enrollment and attendance at the institution, in each year going forward. 







Black Lives Matter Mural Painted On West State Street Trenton

September 24, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–A Black Lives Matter mural has been painted in front of the African American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey, 379 West State Street yesterday an event was held at 4 pm with members of the AACCNJ, Governor Phil Murphy, Reverend Al Sharpton, and more. See press release below for complete information.


The African American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey (AACCNJ) in conjunction with the State of New Jersey and the National Action Network will construct a “Black Lives Matter” mural, on Wednesday, September 23rd, at the headquarters of the AACCNJ, located at 379 West State Street, Trenton, NJ.

The live painting will commence at 10:00 a.m. and continue throughout the day, culminating in an official ceremony, scheduled for 4:00 p.m. on the front dais of the AACCNJ headquarters. The ceremony will include remarks from John E. Harmon, Sr., IOM, Founder, President & CEO, AACCNJ, The Honorable, Phil Murphy, Governor, State of NJ, The Honorable Reed Gusciora , Mayor City of Trenton, Reverend Al Sharpton, Founder, National Action Network, Rev. Dr. Steffie Bartley, Sr., Northeast Regional Director of National Action Network, and Rabbi Abe Friedman, Senior Rabbi of Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel (BZBI) in Philadelphia, PA, among others.

“We believe that simulating the Black Lives Matter murals that are happening nationwide demonstrates the support of the AACCNJ with the merits and messaging of the nationwide movement, and will provide a platform for local and state government to show their endorsement of this message – with their presence at this event.”, said John E. Harmon, Sr., IOM.



Attorney General Grewal Announces Results of New Survey Showing 239 Of New Jersey’s Law Enforcement Agencies Now Use Body-Worn Cameras

Attorney General advocates for additional police departments to deploy body-worn cameras as a tool to promote accountability, assist police, and build police-community trust

September 24, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal today announced the results of a statewide survey of New Jersey’s law enforcement agencies that revealed that 239 of the 537 agencies surveyed now equip some or all of their officers with body-worn cameras.

The survey conducted by the Attorney General’s Office includes state, county, and local law enforcement agencies, as well as college campus police, a school district police department, and bridge police.  It does not include federal agencies.  The 239 agencies with body-worn cameras have a total of 12,195 cameras.  The survey represents a snapshot of body-worn cameras owned as of Sept. 23, 2020.  It does not include cameras that are in the process of being acquired by law enforcement agencies.

The New Jersey State Police recently completed the process of outfitting all State Troopers on road patrol with body-worn cameras.  Of the four State Police patrol units, Troop A, Troop B, and Troop C were fully outfitted with body-worn cameras by the start of July 2020.  Troop D was fully outfitted with body-worn cameras by the end of August.

The survey indicates that the number of law enforcement agencies with body-worn cameras is approaching half of the agencies in the state— specifically, approximately 45 percent of the total number of agencies. 

To see the full survey results click here.

Attorney General Grewal supports the use of body-worn cameras, but cannot mandate their statewide use unless the Legislature appropriates sufficient, reliable funding to help local police departments purchase and maintain these systems.  Police departments are welcome—and encouraged—to purchase their own body-worn camera systems if they are in a position to do so, in order to promote accountability and strengthen police-community relations.

A 2017 survey of police officers using body-worn cameras in New Jersey indicated that most were highly satisfied with the devices and viewed them as effective tools for promoting public trust, protecting officers, and gathering evidence.

“I applaud the many police departments that have embraced body-worn cameras as a critical tool for enhancing police-community relations, and I urge more to follow suit,” said Attorney General Grewal.  “The need for accountability and transparency has never been greater, as we strive to build stronger trust between police officers and the communities they serve.  Body cameras not only enhance accountability in policing, they protect the vast majority of officers who do the right thing day-in and day-out, reducing unfounded complaints.  As an objective witness to law enforcement actions, they bolster public confidence and can even help de-escalate volatile situations.”

In 2015, New Jersey implemented the following statewide policy governing the use of body-worn cameras by police departments that elect to deploy them: http://www.nj.gov/oag/dcj/agguide/directives/2015-1_BWC.pdf

Since then, Attorney General Grewal has advocated for greater transparency with respect to video footage of police use-of-force incidents.  Shortly after taking office in 2018, he issued AG Directive 2018-1, which established a policy that body- and dash-camera videos of police deadly force incidents are subject to public release, following a formal request, once the initial investigation of the incident is substantially complete, typically within 20 days of the incident.

Attorney General Grewal enhanced that policy in December 2019, as part of his Excellence in Policing Initiative by issuing the Independent Prosecutor Directive (AG Directive 2019-4,), which lays out a comprehensive process for the independent investigation of police use-of-force and death-in-custody incidents.  New disclosure rules in that directive include release of any third-party footage captured by surveillance cameras or a civilian’s smartphone and later obtained by law enforcement during the investigation.

Working with law enforcement statewide and community stakeholders, Attorney General Grewal has implemented some of the most ambitious and progressive policing reforms in the country:

  • Mandating implicit bias training for all prosecutors, state and county detectives, and state troopers. 
  • Creating a statewide Conviction Review Unit. 
  • Launching a first-in-the-nation statewide officer resiliency program. 
  • Banning chokeholds except in the most limited circumstances. 
  • Holding regular community listening sessions in all 21 counties in New Jersey. 
  • Overhauling the state’s police training programs. 
  • Building a statewide use-of-force database.

Attorney General Grewal is also undertaking a substantial rewrite of the state’s use of force policy – the first rewrite of the policy in 20 years – incorporating feedback from public listening sessions held earlier this summer. The revised policy is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

More information on the Excellence in Policing Initiative is found at this link:

https://www.nj.gov/oag/excellence/

BREAKING: House Fire In Hamilton Quickly Knocked Down

September 23, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–The Hamilton Township Fire Department was dispatched to the 600 Block of Paxon Avenue for a house fire at 8:41 pm. Upon arrival of the first due fire apparatus, fire crews were met with heavy fire showing in the front of the home, coming from the attached garage. The fire was also extending inside the home from the garage area. A full first alarm was called sending additional equipment to the scene.

Firefighters quickly put 2 lines in service and laid a 5″ supply line towards Flock Road to the nearest hydrant. The fire was quickly knocked down and placed under control within 15 minutes. Firefighters remained on scene for overhaul and the fire investigation. The Township Fire Marshal was still on scene investigation the fire at the time of this report. There is no word of the cause of the fire. Once additional details become available the story will be updated and corrections if any made.



In the Facebook Live Video says Flock but the fire was on Paxon Ave. It was not too far off Flock was the confusion.

Romanian National Was Sentenced Today To 33 Months In Prison For ATM Skimming In Central And North Jersey

September 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–

A Romanian national was sentenced today to 33 months in prison for his role in a conspiracy to steal bank account information from thousands of customers by installing secret card-reading devices and pinhole cameras on ATMs throughout New Jersey and elsewhere, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito announced.

Lucian Burulea, 34, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud. U.S. District Judge Peter G. Sheridan imposed the sentence this afternoon in Trenton federal court.

According to documents filed in this case and statements made in court:

Burulea admitted he was part of an ATM skimming scheme that stole bank account information by installing hidden card-reading devices on ATMs throughout northern and central New Jersey. Burulea previously acknowledged that he and his conspirators created bank cards using the fraudulently obtained account information, which they used to unlawfully withdraw large amounts of cash from various ATMs. The scheme, which involved actual and attempted losses of more than $1.5 million dollars, affected over 1,000 bank customers.

In addition to the prison term, Judge Sheridan sentenced Burulea to three years of supervised release and ordered him to pay $265,957 in restitution.

U.S. Attorney Carpenito credited special agents of the FBI, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr.; detectives with the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office, under the direction of Prosecutor Yolanda Ciccone; and detectives with the Woodbridge Police Department, under the direction of Police Director Robert Hubner, with the investigation.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Shawn Barnes of the U.S. Attorney’s Office OCDETF/Narcotics Unit in Newark.

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Defense counsel: John Holliday Esq., Trenton

NY Man Travels To Bordentown, NJ Intending To Meet 13 Year Old For Sex

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–A New York man was arrested today after travelling from New York to New Jersey to meet an individual, whom he believed was a 13-year old girl, for sex, U.S Attorney Craig Carpenito announced.

Eduardo Silva, 42, of Bronx, New York, is charged in a three-count complaint with enticing a minor to engage in sexual activity, travelling from New York to New Jersey for the purpose of engaging in unlawful sexual conduct, and sending obscene materials over the Internet. He appeared today by videoconference before U.S. Magistrate Judge Zahid N. Quraishi and was detained.

According to documents filed in this case and statements made in court:

On Sept. 5, 2020, Silva, while using an online social media application, sent a message to an individual he believed was an underage girl, but who was actually an undercover federal agent. Silva asked whether the minor was “into older guys” and over the course of the next several days sent a series of online communications and text messages, discussing his intent to travel and engage in sexual activity. He also sent sexually explicit images of his genitals to the individual, whom he believed was a minor. On Sept. 23, 2020, Silva was arrested when he travelled to a motel in Bordentown, New Jersey, intending to meet a 13-year-old girl for sex.

The charge of using a facility of interstate commerce to entice a minor to engage in sexual activity carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison and a maximum sentence of life in prison; the charge of travel with the intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct with a minor carries a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison; and the charge of using the internet to transfer obscene matters to an individual who had not attained the age of 16 carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison. The charges also each carry a maximum fine of $250,000 per count.

U.S. Attorney Carpenito credited special agents of the Department of Homeland Security, Homeland Security Investigations, Cherry Hill, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Jason J. Molina in Newark, with the investigation that led to Silva’s arrest. U.S. Attorney Carpenito also thanked the Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office and the Bordentown Township Police Department for their assistance in the investigation.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Ray Mateo of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Criminal Division in Trenton.

If you have information regarding the pending prosecution, or you believe you or someone you know may have been victimized by the defendant, the Department of Homeland Security requests that you contact them at 1-866-347-2423. Identified victims may be eligible for certain services and rights under federal and state law.

The charges and allegations contained in the complaint are merely accusations, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Defense counsel: Brian Reilly Esq., Assistant Federal Public Defender, Trenton

Hamilton Man Accused of Aggravated Sexual Assault Ordered Detained

September 23, 2020


Related MidJersey.News story here: Hamilton Man Arrested For Aggravated Sexual Assault


HAMILTON, NJ (MERCER)–A 26-year-old Hamilton man arrested last week and charged with sexually assaulting women at two separate gatherings at his Liberty Street residence last year was ordered detained Wednesday pending final resolution to his case.

At a hearing held Wednesday afternoon in Mercer County Superior Court, Judge Robert W. Bingham II granted Assistant Prosecutor Tim Ward’s motion to detain Eridson M. Rodriguez pending final resolution to his case.

Last week, Rodriguez was arrested and charged with two counts of first-degree aggravated sexual assault and two counts of third-degree aggravated criminal sexual contact.  He is accused of having intercourse with two women, ages 19 and 20, who were intoxicated and incapacitated during gatherings at his house in March 2019 and again in May 2019.

Since his arrest, four additional victims have stepped forward and accused Rodriguez of similar crimes.  He now faces additional charges of aggravated sexual assault and aggravated criminal sexual contact.

The investigation is ongoing.  Anyone with information on the case is asked to contact Detective Shari Johnson of the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office Special Victims Unit at (609) 989-6758 or Hamilton Police Detective Daniel Inman at (609) 581-4000.

Despite having been charged, all persons are presumed innocent until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.


Trenton Man Seriously Injured In Early Morning Hamilton Crash

September 23, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–On September 23, 2020 at approximately 2:00 am a motor vehicle crash occurred at the intersection of Klockner Rd and Kuser Rd.  A 2002 Honda CR-V driven by Auner Rauda, 43 year old male from Trenton, was traveling eastbound on Klockner Rd when for an unknown reason, he crossed over the westbound lane, left the roadway, and struck a tree at the intersection with Kuser Rd. The vehicle became engulfed in flames and Mr. Rauda was extracted from the vehicle by Officer Ryan Fratz, who was the first responding officer to arrive on scene and Kuser Rd resident John Hodnicki.  Mr. Rauda suffered serious injuries and was transported to Capital Health Regional Medical Center by ambulance.  

The crash investigation is ongoing and any witnesses are asked to contact Officer Devin Hendricksen or Officer Brian DiBiasi of the Hamilton Police Traffic Unit at (609)581-4000 or the Hamilton Police Crime Tip Hotline at (609)581-4008.

NJ State Prison, State Corrections Officer Indicted

September 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–A Mercer County grand jury returned an indictment Tuesday charging a state corrections officer and his accomplice with accepting bribes to smuggle contraband into New Jersey State Prison, Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo J. Onofri reported.

The three-count indictment charges Correction Officers Jamaine Russell, 27, of Deptford, and Debra Rayner, 34, of Mullica Hill, with one count each of second-degree official misconduct, second-degree bribery and third-degree financial facilitation of criminal activity.

The indictment alleges that Russell, a NJDOC employee since 2016, used his position to receive cash payments in exchange for bringing narcotics and other contraband into New Jersey State Prison in Trenton from October 2018 through November 2019.  The indictment alleges that Russell, a NJDOC employee since 2016, used his position to receive cash payments in exchange for bringing narcotics and other contraband into New Jersey State Prison in Trenton from October 2018 through November 2019.  Rayner was indicted as an accomplice to Russell’s illegal acts, and while she herself is not an employee of NJDOC, she is legally accountable for Russell’s conduct because she promoted and facilitated the commission of the crimes charged.

Russell and Rayner were charged in November 2019 following an investigation by the New Jersey Department of Corrections Special Investigations Division.  Assistant Prosecutor Rachel Cook, chief of the Economic Crime Unit, presented the case to the grand jury.

Despite having been indicted, every defendant is presumed innocent until found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

Continuing Coverage: Trenton 3rd Alarm Now “Fire and Suspicious Death” Investigation


Previous MidJersey.News stories here:

Update: 3rd Alarm In 2 Family Home With “Collyer’s Mansion” Conditions Turns Fatal

3rd Alarm On Southard Street


September 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Fire and Suspicious Death Under Investigation On Tuesday evening, the Mercer County Homicide Task Force was called out to a working fire in the 700 block of Southard Street that began around 8:30 p.m.

When the fire was extinguished, the body of a deceased male was located inside a residence in fire debris.

The Mercer County Homicide Task Force, the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Arson Unit and the Trenton Police Department continue to investigate. Anyone with information is asked to call (609) 989-6406. Information can also be emailed to mchtftips@mercercounty.org




Update: 3rd Alarm In 2 Family Home With “Collyer’s Mansion” Conditions Turns Fatal


Continuing Coverage: Trenton 3rd Alarm Now “Suspicious Death” Investigation

Updated information from last nights MidJersey.News breaking news story: 3rd Alarm On Southard Street


September 23, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton officials confirm that one person has perished in a house fire last night on Southard Street. The fire started around 8:30 pm in the 700 Block of Southard Street. First arriving firefighters found heavy fire conditions in a 2 1/2 story, 2 family home and had to fight “Collyer’s Mansion” type conditions, from hording. The fire eventually escalated to 3 alarms. Trenton officials also report one additional person was displaced. No further information is available at this time.

A “Collyer’s Mansion” is a term used by firefighters to describe a home packed with materials, trash and debris that makes for a tough firefight.




Quick Knockdown Of Machinery Fire Saves Large Commercial Printing Facility In Robbinsville

September 23, 2020

ROBBINSVILLE, NJ (MERCER)–At 6:55 am Robbinsville Township firefighters were dispatched to the 1st block of Applegate Drive for a building fire in a commercial building.

Mutual aid was also sent from Hamilton Township Fire Department and Hope Fire Company of Allentown-Upper Freehold. The fire was also at Robbinsville’s shift change making available an additional engine for the firefight.

When fire apparatus first arrived crews found a large industrial printing press on fire in a 190,000 square foot printing facility. Firefighters stretched a hand line and quickly extinguished the fire inside the building, perhaps saving millions of dollars and loss of jobs.

Firefighters remained on scene to help evacuate smoke from the building and overhaul the fire. The Robbinsville Township fire marshal is investigating the fire.

BREAKING: 3 Alarm Fire On Southard Street

September 22, 2020


Continuing Coverage: Trenton 3rd Alarm Now “Suspicious Death” Investigation

UPDATED: SEE UPDATED STORY HERE: Update: 3rd Alarm In 2 Family Home With “Collyer’s Mansion” Conditions Turns Fatal


BREAKING NEWS REPORT: Breaking news report from on scene and radio reports, if and when official information becomes available story will be updated and corrections made.

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Around 8:30 pm the Trenton Fire Department was sent to the 700 Block of Southard Street for a house fire. Upon arrival companies struck an “All Hands” sending the full first alarm and additional EMS units were also called to the scene. Fire was in a 2 1/2 story 2 family home with heavy fire conditions throughout. About 20 minutes into the fire a 2nd Alarm was called for and eventually the fire became a 3rd Alarm.

No further information was available about the fire.



Mercer County Park Commission Awarded $150,000 Grant For Restoration In Roebling Park

September 22, 2020

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP, NJ (MERCER)–The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have announced that the Mercer County Park Commission will be awarded a grant from the 2020 Delaware Watershed Conservation Fund for $150,000. This grant will help fund the installation of a living shoreline and public access to the waterways in Roebling Park and the Abbott Marshlands. This three-step restoration project will include constructing a 500-linear-foot living shoreline along Watson’s Creek, conducting a feasibility study for the re-introduction of freshwater mussels in the marsh and installing a user-friendly and ecologically sensitive public boat launch. This award is a result of collaboration between the Park Commission, Princeton Hydro and the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary. 

Freshwater tidal marsh is one of the most ecologically valuable habitat types in New Jersey, yet it has experienced the highest percentage of loss and degradation of wetland habitat in the state. The marsh within Roebling Park in Hamilton is in the heart of the larger 3,000-acre Abbott Marshlands, the northernmost tidal freshwater wetland on the Delaware River. Approximately 309 acres of Roebling Park are freshwater tidal wetlands, and provide habitat for rare organisms such as wild rice, river otter and American eel, and a prime breeding habitat for bald eagles. 

“This grant will help further the county’s efforts to improve wetland functions and passive recreational opportunities in Roebling Park, an ecological jewel that’s located just minutes outside the City of Trenton,” said Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes. “Native plants, wildlife and the public all will benefit from the ongoing restoration in the park.”

The Park Commission is currently working with Princeton Hydro to conduct a multi-year, multi-phased restoration of these important freshwater tidal wetlands in Roebling Park. This ecosystem restoration will enhance the park’s biodiversity, restore natural tidal function, improve recreational opportunities through the eradication of Phragmites and promote a native floral community in the wetland. The installation of a living shoreline and ecologically sensitive boat launch will continue building on the overarching mission for the larger wetland restoration, which is to provide ecological uplift to the wetlands within Roebling Park, while improving ecosystem services.

“For the last several years the Park Commission has significantly increased its efforts to restore the unique ecosystems within Roebling Park,” said Park Commission Executive Director Aaron T. Watson. “This grant will now allow us to expand upon our work to date and also result in new ways for Mercer County residents to get outside and enjoy this wonderful natural resource.” The Delaware Watershed Conservation Fund aims to conserve and restore natural areas, corridors and waterways on public and private lands to support native migratory and resident wildlife and fish, and native plants; and to contribute to the social health and economic vitality of the communities in the Delaware River watershed. These grants address priorities in NFWF’s Delaware River Watershed Business Plan. The 2020 year round of funding will support 37 new or continuing conservation and restoration grants totaling $8.12 million.  The 2020 awards generated $22.08 million in match from the grantees, creating a total conservation impact of more than $30.2 million. Click here for a full list of 2020 DWCF awards.

Historic Jackson Street Bridge Restoration Groundbreaking In Trenton

September 22, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton had a groundbreaking event for the Jackson Street Bridge Restoration this morning. The Jackson Street Bridge was listed as a contributing element of the Mill Hill Historic District’s entry into the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.  The $880,000 project is expected to last approximately two to three months.

The New Jersey Steel and Iron Company, which completed the iron fabrication for the Jackson Street Bridge in 1888, based their plant in Trenton, and supplied iron parts for the construction of similar bridges.

Few bridges of this type are still around. The Jackson Street Bridge’s role as a pedestrian bridge has allowed it avoid significant deterioration and stand as a reminder of the Capital City’s history of economic development and innovation. 

The New Jersey Historic Trust provided $324,793 for renovations to be made to the Jackson Street Bridge and the City of Trenton contributed $557,207 to close the gap on funding costs for the program. Included in the costs of the project are repairs to the bridge’s walls, resurfacing the deck of the bridge, and painting the metal beams. 


City of Trenton Breaks Ground on Historic Jackson Street Bridge Rehab Project

Trenton, N.J. –Mayor W. Reed Gusciora today held a groundbreaking event to launch the rehabilitation of the Jackson Street Bridge, which currently connects Mill Hill Park with the Mill Hill neighborhood.

“We are proud to partner with the state on this important rehabilitation project,” said Mayor Gusciora. “Jackson Street Bridge was part of the Mill Hill Historic District’s entry into the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, and our shared investment will keep this iconic Trenton landmark functional for decades to come.”

The N.J. Historic Trust provided $324,793 for renovations made to the Jackson Street Bridge, with the City of Trenton contributing $557,207 to close the funding gap for the program. In total, the project, which is expected to last between two to three months, costs $882,000.

“Trenton residents, but especially those involved with the Old Mill Hill Society and those who live in Mill Hill, see this bridge every day,” said North Ward City Councilwoman Marge Caldwell-Wilson. “Promoting the arts and culture, preserving historical sites, and running programming for our residents to enjoy is all part of our commitment to community development.”

The N.J. Historic Trust, housed within the N.J. Department of Community Affairs, provided the Administration with $534,000 in 2018 for the completion of renovations to Douglass House, the headquarters of General George Washington during the Revolutionary War and to the Jackson Street Bridge. In particular, the Trust provided funding through the Garden State Historic Preservation Trust Fund, which has awarded $137 million in capital grants since 1990 to assist in preserving projects across New Jersey.

“On behalf of the Trust, we are proud to have supported the restoration of the Jackson Street Bridge,” said Dorothy Guzzo, Executive Director of the N.J. Historic Trust. “Maintaining the bridge and protecting the character of the Capital City historic sites can also signal economic development.”

Included in the project costs are repairs to the bridge’s walls, resurfacing the deck of the bridge, and repainting the metal beams. The triangular sloping beams, also referred to as trusses, are a product of the Jackson Street Bridge’s unique Pratt truss design. Around the country, the few Pratt truss bridges that remain are often used by vehicles and freight trains and are slowly being decommissioned due to the cost of maintaining them for non-pedestrian usage.

“Day to day, our focus is on improving residents’ quality of life, expanding employment opportunities, and serving our youth and seniors, all while preserving the culture and the history of the Capital City,” said Sam T. Frisby, Mercer County Commissioner and Chief Executive Officer of the YMCA of Trenton. “As former Director of Recreation for the City of Trenton, it is intergovernmental collaboration like this that reduces the cost to Trenton residents and allows important restorations to occur.”

As project maintenance continues until November, a large covering will serve to protect the Assunpink Creek and the surrounding area while new concrete is poured, and the deck is surfaced with bituminous concrete.

“The New Jersey Steel and Iron Company fabricated the iron parts for this bridge in 1888. After 132 years of usage, this familiar site to Trentonians will finally be revitalized,” said Mayor Gusciora. “Community leaders and residents have called for this project’s completion since 2013, and we’re happy that the city can finally make it happen.”


Sayreville Man Admits Role In Area Heroin Conspiracy Distribution In Monmouth and Middlesex Counties

September 22, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–A Middlesex County, New Jersey, man today admitted that he conspired to distribute more than 100 grams of heroin as part of a conspiracy responsible for distributing significant quantities of heroin and cocaine in the Bayshore area of Monmouth and Middlesex counties, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito announced.

Daniel McHugh, 50, of Sayreville, New Jersey, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Brian R. Martinotti via videoconference to an information charging him with one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin. McHugh also admitted to conspiring to distribute and possess with intent to distribute a quantity of cocaine and possessing with intent to distribute a quantity of crack cocaine.

Today’s guilty plea follows a coordinated takedown in November 2018 of 15 defendants charged by complaint with conspiracy to distribute heroin and cocaine. To date, 13 defendants have pleaded guilty, including supplier Gregory Gillens and lead defendant Guy Jackson. Gillens was sentenced on Sept. 8, 2020, to 10 years in prison. Jackson is awaiting sentencing.

According to documents filed in this case and statements made in court:

From May 2017 to November 2018, McHugh and others engaged in a narcotics conspiracy that operated in the Raritan Bayshore region of Middlesex and northern Monmouth counties. Through the interception of telephone calls and text messages pursuant to court-authorized wiretap orders, controlled purchases of heroin and cocaine, the use of confidential sources of information, and other investigative techniques, law enforcement learned that McHugh regularly obtained heroin and cocaine for further distribution from Jackson. Some of the heroin distributed by the conspiracy contained fentanyl, a dangerous synthetic opioid.

On the date of his arrest, McHugh gave consent to search his residence. During that search, law enforcement recovered quantities of heroin, cocaine, and crack cocaine intended for further distribution.

The heroin conspiracy count to which McHugh pleaded guilty carries a statutory mandatory minimum term of five years in prison, a maximum of 40 years in prison, and a fine of up to $5 million. Sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 20, 2021.

U.S. Attorney Carpenito credited Special Agents of the FBI, Newark Division, Red Bank Resident Agency, Jersey Shore Gang and Criminal Organization Task Force (including representatives from the Bradley Beach Police Department, Brick Police Department, Howell Police Department, Marlboro Police Department, Monmouth County Sheriff’s Office, Toms River Police Department, and Union Beach Police Department) under the direction of Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr.; Special Agents of the FBI, Philadelphia Division, Scranton Resident Agency, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Michael J. Driscoll; the New Jersey State Police, under the direction of Colonel Patrick J. Callahan, Superintendent; the Matawan Police Department, under the direction of Chief Thomas J. Falco, Jr.; the Holmdel Police Department, under the direction of Chief John Mioduszewski; the Highlands Police Department, under the direction of Chief Robert Burton; the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office, under the direction of Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni; the Old Bridge Police Department, under the direction of Chief William A. Volkert; the Keansburg Police Department, under the direction of Chief James K. Pigott; the Hazlet Police Department, under the direction of Chief Philip Meehan; and the Aberdeen Police Department, under the direction of Chief Richard A. Derechailo, with the investigation leading to today’s guilty plea.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Elisa T. Wiygul of the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s Criminal Division in Trenton.

The charges and allegations against the two remaining defendants are merely accusations and they are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Defense counsel: James R. Murphy Esq., Princeton, New Jersey

TWW Launches Two-Year Project to Paint Fire Hydrants, Color Coding Them to Indicate Flow Rate for Fire Suppression

September 22, 2020

TRENTON, NJ (MERCER)–Trenton Water Works will be painting 3,501 fire hydrants in its five-municipality service area over the next 24 months, weather permitting.

“We are improving the quality of TWW’s fire hydrants for effective fire suppression,” said Michael Walker, Chief of Communications and Community Relations. “We’ve been inspecting fire hydrants for operability and flow rate over the last few months, and we now plan to vary their color to indicate how quickly water flows from them to fire personnel and emergency responders.”

TWW personnel will strip hydrants of old layers of paint, and then apply primer and two fresh coats. Color codes to indicate flow volume in gallons per minute are as follows: Light Blue: 1,500 gallons per minute; Green: 1,000-1,499 gallons per minute; Orange: 500-999 gallons per minute; Red: less than 500 gallons per minute. 

TWW personnel must have direct access to the hydrants. We are therefore asking residents to please remove any plantings or decorations that might be obscuring local hydrants. Hydrants should never be blocked, hidden, or decorated, as this interferes with emergency access.

“We ask that residents not paint or decorate fire hydrants, which prevents fire personnel from knowing a hydrant’s flow rate during an emergency,” added Walker.

If you have questions about TWW’s hydrant paint project, including reporting hydrants that have been knocked over or are not functioning properly, please call TWW’s Construction and Maintenance at (609) 989-3222.